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Type 1 Diabetes in 15 Month Old.

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posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 11:04 AM
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Last week, my 15 month old son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. It was scary but he's since recovered from ketoacidosis and is feeling great at home.

My partner and I have come to terms with the shock, and the diabetes is completely manageable.

The piece of the puzzle we're missing is diet. We recieved training on counting carbs, and.... that's it. We were pretty perplexed. Even though the hospital dietician was gracious and helpful, there must be more we can do to keep our sons blood sugar under control than to just count his carbs and adminster the correct dose of insulin.

She gave us a copy of the Canada Food Guide (very similar to the Food Pyramid in the US) and said they use it in the hospitals kitchen to decide meals for diabetic patients. Well, some of the meals they served my son brought me to tears.

Like: 2 chopped cardboard chicken nuggets with a side of instant mash.

Chopped dry turkey with rubbery frozen carrots and instant mash.

Powdered scrambled eggs with Arrowroot cookies and skim milk.

Maybe I'm venting, as this is nothing like what I would cook at home, but it really flipped the script on what we thought "diabetic" people could eat (our own lack of education). They labelled our son "very fussy" and started bringing just toast, mac and cheese, and .....ice cream.

At home my kid will eat anything, so now I'm asking the members who might have experience...what do you or your loved ones feed their type 1 diabetic family members to keep them healthy and happy?

My partner and I generally consider Canadas good guide a joke and prefer full fat diary, homemade baked goods, we don't give our child juice, and don't eat a lot of sugar in general.

I know I can at least do better than the hospital kitchen; but the endocrine team needs him to be served 40grams of carbs at each meal to figure out his insulin dose right now. That's a lot for a toddler! I'm struggling to vary his meals.




posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct
I am sorry the hear about your son. I have been struggling with type 2 diabetes for years. My doctor has been telling me to regulate my blood by eating more meat, fruits and vegetables...Well, come to find out, meat and fat is what causes the cells inability to absorb the sugar. The cells are coated with fat and the sugar cannot be absorbed, so it stays in the bloodstream.
I changed my diet and within 2 days of little or no meat / fat, my numbers went from a consistent 160-190 every morning, down to 110-130 in two days!!
If you haven't already, please consider watching a video called "What the Health," on Netflix. Good luck.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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Carbs minus Protein equals net carb intake.

Be sure to watch the labels if you buy anything with the word "diet" or "lite". Some of those have more carbs than the regular. Just remember carbs are your nemesis, look at those numbers instead of just sugar.

Hang in there. It is frustrating at first, but you'll have it all figured out fairly quickly. Spikes are the biggest thing to watch for. I'd recommend a food journal so you know what types of foods have what types of reactions.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:21 PM
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Bummer, type one is much more of a problem than type 2. I know a couple who had a kid that had type one, they found out of it when the baby was young. That kid is not a kid anymore, he must be around thirty or so. I do not know how he is doing, I haven't talked to his parents in over twenty some years. He needed insulin shots. Your kid should still have a decent life, he will just have to learn how to eat and make sure he gets his insulin. It is an inconvenience now, we have much better ways of treating that condition now and lots more knowledge of how to eat for that condition.

I hope things go well with your kid. The earlier they find out these things the better it is. Don't be feeding your kid a bunch of highly prepared foods, it will get insulin resistance and that with the type one can be a major problem. Forty grams of carbs in a meal sounds like a bit much for a fifteen month old. What kind of nuts do they have running their program there, junkfood junkies?
edit on 5-3-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:30 PM
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Reality check. Your kid's diet requirements are about to impact everything you eat in your household. You can go back to normal in about 18 years.
That's the un-sugar-coated truth.
But, you'll all be OK.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Your doctor - how sympathetic and helpful (as most seem to be these days). (NOT)

Check this guy out. He has a number of videos out about diabetes (Type II) and how to reduce/cure it. I realize your son is an infant and it's Type 1, but this will give you good insight into what is going on and how you can educate yourself and rewire your thinking on how to move forward.

Also, check out low-glycemic foods.

I wish your son all the best. He's going to do just fine.

www.youtube.com...
edit on 5/3/18 by ccseagull because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/3/18 by ccseagull because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: Deplorable

According to the dietician, we don't have to change our diet at all. That's the thing, we know there must be some beneficial changes we can make, but the team at our local hospital doesn't really specialize in nutrition.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: ccseagull

Thanks.
Unfortunately, Type 1 and 2 are so different, so diet advice for one doesn't exactly seem to translate to the other.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Deplorable

According to the dietician, we don't have to change our diet at all. That's the thing, we know there must be some beneficial changes we can make, but the team at our local hospital doesn't really specialize in nutrition.


I think what the poster was saying is you are going to have to lead by example. At least in front of him lol.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Of course, I apologize if it came across wrong. Type I is the body's immune system attacking, and type II is insulin resistance. I just thought the food aspect, compared to the useless Canadian Food Guide, may help



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Carrots and potatoes are not low carb. Ice cream? Who are those people?

Lots of greens, lots of protein. Whole grains with natural fiber to slow the release of glucose in the blood. Type one is different in that it is caused by a faulty pancreas not by a bad diet which you guys know since your child is very young and not in charge of his own diet.
Suzanne Sommers wrote a nice little book on desserts that are low carb so the little one won't feel deprived when dessert time rolls around.


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Good luck. I'm sure you guys will figure this out. :up
edit on 352018 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 01:07 PM
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I’m a T2, but know a few T1’s.

Keep his diet wholesome and healthy; remember that his body is developing and needs the best nutrients you can provide.

Avoid “packaged” and “processed” foods as much as possible, but don’t get paranoid about it.

One T1 I know, now in her 20’s switched to a vegetarian diet some years ago to make carb management easier, but remember that protein from meats help build growing bodies.

And do not avoid fruit juices, completely!

If your are managing your son’s carb intake with regard to his regular meal (counting carbs), fruit juices, especially apple and orange, can be an easy way to “make up” the missing carbs he might need during his “calibration phase”.
edit on 5-3-2018 by Bhadhidar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 02:32 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Deplorable

According to the dietician, we don't have to change our diet at all. That's the thing, we know there must be some beneficial changes we can make, but the team at our local hospital doesn't really specialize in nutrition.

Well, you don't have to, but, you're going to wind up raising a child that fully understands the meaning of a deprived life. How do you think you would feel if you could smell and see a fresh baked apple pie, but weren't allowed to chow down on it? Do you really think a little kid can actually control themselves when it comes to eating what is desired? No, you don't have to, but you'll be setting up your kid to chase 'diabetic control' his whole life.

And, while you've got me back at the boards: About your hospital and nutrition specialists: Much of what you're going to learn you'll be able to readily gather from everyone in group sessions. You're going to be in the waiting room to see the endocrinologist a lot. Ask there, and here, and everywhere!! Hell, my daughter's been out of the house now for eight years and I've forgotten so much of what you need to have a first-hand awareness of (I'm so sorry). And, don't believe everything you read on the Internet. So much of it is BassAckwards (Type I/Type II confusion).

Anyway, I'm not worried. You're doing things right and everything's gonna be OK. YOU need to hear that from people that have gone before you. Be in charge of the lifestyle required by your child and ensure the stage is set for success.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

I'm type 1 and only have been for the past 3 years now, it's been a hell of an adjustment.

In reality you can eat what you want so long as you take the appropriate amount of insulin to compensate. Aside from the diabetes I'm in pretty good health and I get plenty of exercise, so I do treat myself. You're probably going to be fine with home cooking - the biggest problem for me is when I go to a restaurant or get a takeaway and have to guess as to how much insulin I should take. Almonds and nuts in general seem to be a good snack food.

The biggest thing I'll say to you is monitor very closely as when I was first diagnosed I got put on a type of long lasting insulin that didn't work very well for me and I was hospitalised a couple of times before it got changed.

You've got a 15 month old so some things won't be a factor yet, but when they do get to that age they need to be very careful with alcohol and you'll need to have some frank discussions about drugs too - they're going to be extra bad for a diabetic. I'm on UK time, but if you want to ask anything, I'll check back tomorrow.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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My mother-in-law's Type 1, she follows basic low-carb in general, but quantifies her style of eating as a Low Glycemic/Glygemic Index diet. She says it's actually not as much work as other approaches are, and she's still around, kickin' away in her 60's, so it can't be that bad.

Maybe it would be worth looking into for your little bub? It's still a numbers game, just a generally more straightforward one, from what I understand of it.
edit on 3/5/2018 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: jokei
In reality you can eat what you want so long as you take the appropriate amount of insulin to compensate.

My MIL & hubby alike would clock you for that, it's not true!! We briefly had a room mate with Type 1 a few years back, and that's what he babbled on about, and did, until he was rushed to the ER in a diabetic COMA. You cannot simply eat whatever TF you want and just compensate with insulin, it doesn't work like that.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

My grandpa actually made it to age 97 as a Type 1 diabetic (since childhood). The last ten years of his life, he didn't even need insulin shots -- his diabetes was completely controlled through diet.

I know this isn't always the story...but it was his story.

OP, I don't have any real nutrition advice to give you. My grandma made all the family meals and she's gone now, so I can't ask her more about it. But, I do know she was very disciplined about controlling my grandfather's diet and my dad's (he was a type 1 diabetic since childhood, too). Mostly, I just wanted to give you an honest story that would also perhaps lift your spirits, right now. I am sure your 15 month old is just so precious...this diagnosis has probably knocked the wind out of you.

And, I think you are so correct to seek out fuller diet/nutrition advice.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct
In the States , a doctor is required to set up a Diabetic Class for any diabetic.Usually it is held at the local hospital on a regular basis . It is an eight hour class and taught by specialists in different fields. Diet is set up by age , activity levels , weight , A1C count , etc. (My total is 2200 calories per day) . Then you go through a sort of what to eat class and how to determine total calorie count . Then an exercise class in which (by the specifics stated earlier) the amount of exercise per day is developed.
Also , they cover insulin injections specifics.
All this is covered by insurance and it is recommended to go through a "refresher" every now and then as the body changes.

Check for programs like this in your area. Ask the doctor.

Diabetes is nothing to dismiss just by "ok , you can eat this"



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 07:20 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

When I went in after my blood sugar went to orbit and I got a nasty abscess, the hospital fed me stuff that makes your list look almost healthy for a diabetic. Noodles, mashed potatoes, ice cream- and this was after I let them pick my diet for me. a couple times, I didn't even get *fed*.

Add to that dogs and cats getting diabetes, and you begin to wonder what the hell is in our food and water as of late.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 07:21 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: Atsbhct
In the States , a doctor is required to set up a Diabetic Class for any diabetic.Usually it is held at the local hospital on a regular basis . It is an eight hour class and taught by specialists in different fields. Diet is set up by age , activity levels , weight , A1C count , etc. (My total is 2200 calories per day) . Then you go through a sort of what to eat class and how to determine total calorie count . Then an exercise class in which (by the specifics stated earlier) the amount of exercise per day is developed.
Also , they cover insulin injections specifics.
All this is covered by insurance and it is recommended to go through a "refresher" every now and then as the body changes.

Check for programs like this in your area. Ask the doctor.

Diabetes is nothing to dismiss just by "ok , you can eat this"


No doctor I have seen said anything like that- no class, no nothing here. I'm smelling a big rat.




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