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You see a tree I see 100 tons of dirt

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posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

Huh?




posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: conspiracytheoristIAM

It makes sense lol. Fore' I read it i was thinkin' it's a microscopic topic that is only exemplified by microscopes, artificial & implicable robotical functions. & I was thinkin' them were felony links cause' they weren't the truth about what I was sayin' lol I didn't vomit in my sink though



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 09:40 AM
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Dirt is made from organic matter dying and then decaying.
Trees aren't the only source. You have grass, plants, animals, and animal waste.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 09:54 AM
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So instead of adding all that weight with tree seed, we add it with buildings and streets, etc. I really fail to see the issue here.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: sligtlyskeptical

They are in specific pressure points, it causes continents to split shortly, like 10 to 20 years the way we keep adding.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: SatansPride

Maybe if all of NYC was stacked onto one city block, then i could see geological effects.. but its not "all in one place" as you say. Its spread out. Sure, its packed in pretty tight, but, I don't know, maybe this is worth looking into.

I heard Seattle was built on a mud flat, very unstrurdy ground. A big enough quake amd theoretically the whole downtown section and more could just lose its footing and slide off into the Puget Sound because its just sitting on all that mud so it just needs to be shaken loose and it wont be able to hold itself together any longer. It's like the lesson in the bible. You build your house on stone, on rock, so it has a sturdy foundation to build upon. You don't build it on sand (or mud).

I hope it never happens. But then we also discovered that the entire western washington almost is sitting on a huge lava plume. So the ground could just split open and gulp down the entire Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Either fire or water will get us.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: sligtlyskeptical

A building has much more weight than the same area occupied with trees. Also, it doesn't provide the soil softening a tee creates around it, instead it compacts the soil below it, making it less porous and denser.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: Ursushorribilis
Dirt is made from organic matter dying and then decaying.

English is not my natural language, so I thought that when you were talking about dirt you were talking about soil and not only about the top layer, composed of organic matter, the humus.

If that's what you're talking about then you are right, only organic things like plants and animals create the humus, but the humus is much lighter than the soil beneath it, so the added weight doesn't make much difference.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: SatansPride

Continental plates are not that easy to break, even a huge city like Beijing or New York are nothing compared with a 100 km thick plate.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 01:06 PM
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Deforestation does lead to soil loss through erosion, sadly a great deal of it. Going with it is the very fertility of the soil itself, leaving us less able to grow crops for food. Whether or not all that soil lost can displace enough ocean water to cause sea level rise or not I don't know. We have certainly taken a great deal of water from underground and put it back in to the weather cycle on the surface.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: 3n19m470

Much of Washington DC is built on reclaimed swamp land.
One big quake causing liquefaction and poof! Most of it will be gone.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 01:09 PM
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I like trees. I have lots on my property and burn the ones that die. I buy some firewood from people who get the wood from taking down trees that need to go for some reason. If I did not get it, they would still die.

I am not fond of the pellet stoves, they cause a lot of trees to be cut and the process of making the pellets is harder on the environment. They call that renewable resources, I call it profit making. I do not burn much wood, I like it because I do not have to buy so much oil. Which is another problem which unbalances the ecosystem.

Don't waste heat or energy, that keeps things from getting out of hand. Trees cannot reabsorb the CO2 from a jet flying really high in the sky. Do we really need to be flying all over the place in jets that have subsidized fuel.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 01:19 PM
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This thread is a bit like an ethnographic study of an isolated tribe.

OP , obvs it doesnt work like that but i want to encourage you to continue with your thought provoking thread making



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: SatansPride
True facts, improbable to stop, the apocolyspe is nye.


There are no facts here. No links, no evidence, just ramblings.

Your title and text are contradictory. 100 or 1000 tons of dirt from a tree. FACTS please!

Cities are nothing like rocks on wooden tables. Very bad analogy.

Your concepts of geology are fundementally flawed.

Nice try, stick at it.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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Actually if you could lay the tree thing aside, you kinda, sorta hit on something meaningful, not earth ending though.

Sinking land, rising risk...

Abstract of the paper that's based on.

The shear weight and volume of materials being deposited in the worlds great river delta's, combined with urbanization are always at odds with the survival of those communities who foolishly build and live on them. Keeping their heads above water is a constant battle at a huge financial cost to maintain urban areas where they should not be in the first place. Eventually the battle will be lost.

You're headed down a rabbit hole with something at the end, but the tree thing is not really a thing.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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originally posted by: SatansPride
a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

Huh?


I thought I made some clear statements. Is there anything you don't understand?

Perhaps the idea that the Great Lakes area was scoured clean of soil during the last ice age that ended around 10 to 11 thousand years ago?

Even though there was deposits of sand, gravel and rock pushed down from north of here that resulted in out wash plains when it melted, it was devoid of trees and plants until the glaciers melted away and the area became green again. So there has been thousands of years of dead trees adding to the soil, but now it's only about 4 inches of topsoil in the forests here. Just today I was yard cleaning and removing rotting tree limbs and logs. The logs break down in to very little material in just a few years, there isn't that much to them when they break down from fungus and rot.

Is it the idea that the weight of the glaciers pushed the land down and once it retreated the land has been rebounding upward ever since?

I hope I made myself a little clearer for you.
edit on 4-3-2018 by MichiganSwampBuck because: typo



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 12:02 AM
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I agree with the OP,every time I touch a tree my hands get durty,therefore trees make durt.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 04:53 AM
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OK, I concede that the OP may have a point...

This from the Journal of Irreproducible Results from 1974. I'm shocked. Shocked I say. Something needs to be done.

National Geographic, the Doomsday Machine



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 06:42 AM
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www.planetnatural.com...

It’s difficult to estimate the amount of leaves that go into U.S. landfills and, of course, the estimates vary by season and location (weight versus volume is also a factor; leaves are the largest component of yard waste by volume, grass the largest component by weight). The EPA says 13 per cent of municipal waste volume nation-wide is from lawns, parks and other growing spaces. By weight, it is over half. Eight million tons of leaves went into landfills in 2005. It’s estimated that amount is somewhat less today thanks to the use of composting.

Of all green waste, the amount of leaves included can range from 5 to 50 percent depending on the season. The McGraw-Hill Recycling Handbook, Second Edition states that overall leaves make up 25 percent of all yard wastes in the U.S. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection estimates that grass, leaves, and other wastes from lawns and backyard gardens account for an estimated 18 percent of the annual municipal waste stream. In the fall, leaves can account for as much as 60-80 percent of that waste. In New Jersey, five to 30 percent of municipal solid waste is believed to be leaves. In the fall, this figures jumps to almost half. Because of its dry climate and short-growing season, the state of Wyoming estimates that its percentage of green waste is far lower than the national average.



posted on Mar, 5 2018 @ 06:53 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

Oh that's cool, I don't know much bout' the glaciers. I have seen one of the hills round' my place has grown 3 feet in the last 30 years, some other hills less but they have gotten much bigger. Maybe god just grows this land & nowhere else lol, jk these are places with a lot of unraked leaves. I seen someone pile up a lot of leaves & the pile only shrank a half foot & stuff started growin' on & through it, its still a pile of dirt with stuff on it today.



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