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Now this is a engine

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posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 02:55 PM
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Just came across this on YouTube . I like it and think this type of engine would be great in a Motorcycle . I wonder how much output could be gained by dickering ...

Infiniti's has developed the first variable compression ratio engine which will ever be used in a production vehicle. The compression ratio can vary from a highly boosted 8:1 ratio, to an Atkinson-cycle running 14:1 ratio. What this means is the engine can produce significant horsepower by using the low compression ratio with a turbocharger, or it can achieve excellent fuel economy by using a high compression ratio and an efficient engine cycle. Now there aren’t simply to modes the engine runs in, it can vary and run at any compression ratio between 8:1 and 14:1, allowing for optimal performance and efficiency for whatever the driving condition may be.




posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

Wow.

That beats Mazda's Skyactive X by its own game.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

It was launched in 2016. That story is rather old.

www.autocar.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:18 PM
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Useless....

All cars will be electric by 2040



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

Lol

I wish that'd be true.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

nice.

Somehow reminds me of the MCE-5 engine, developed and tested in France in 2009.
I also find it interesting that they are still spending time and money on a conventional engine, when everybody is clearly moving to Electrical / Hybrid / fuel cell.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Spacespider

Lol

I wish that'd be true.


Believe it..

news.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: the2ofusr1

It was launched in 2016. That story is rather old.

www.autocar.co.uk...



Still interesting. I'm always amazed at the different configurations of combustion engines. With rotary engines for aircraft, there is the Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major. These aren't just a single ring of pistons, but a whole cascade of them:

www.spannerhead.com...
generalaviationnews.com...

That's nothing compared to the size of the diesel engines for ships
www.autoblog.com...

In terms of radical configuration, there are Duke engines, Fairchild-Caminez Engines and many more. Apparently, the camshaft is going tjalopnik.com...



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

They keep saying the electric car will completely replace gas cars, but it never happens.

Not as long as huge gasoline corporations still exist.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:56 PM
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I don't like it. It adds too much weight and new things to break. compression change isn't really that big of a power factor, you may get the advantage of torque off the line and still get high rpms, so a smoother powerband, by at the power will be taken from the whole powerband by weight, and more rotating mass/resistance to the crank. Most race motors are built out of minimizing these things. So much that they knife edge cranks to cut through the oil, or remove the oil bath in the oil pan all together, and just spray it like a dry sump. Even the oil drag takes huge chunks of power.

Motorcycles don't have any lack of power issues, or any major flaws in the powerband that would necessitate adding the weight and complexity of this design.imo

Cool concept though, thanks for sharing.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 03:58 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Spacespider

They keep saying the electric car will completely replace gas cars, but it never happens.

Not as long as huge gasoline corporations still exist.


They wont in 2040



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

Well, I sincerely hope you're right.


It's about time.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

I had caught that camless concept awhile back and thought it would help improve performance . Looking at the engine ,one of the issues is the rod stroke in the vertical position that removes the need for harmonic balancing . That should make it a quick rever , Kind of like clipping weight off the fly wheel does .



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: Spacespider

originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Spacespider

Lol

I wish that'd be true.


Believe it..

news.nationalgeographic.com...


Never going to happen. The phrase "Snowball's chance in hell" comes to mind.

Maybe by 2140.

People won't buy what they don't want. Especially if they are not heavily subsidized.

Gasoline is simply too cheap and readily available, and nothing comes close to matching it's energy density. And that's not even mentioning the fact that gas engines are still getting more efficient all the time. See the OP.

There would have to at least be SOME kind of advantage to buying electric, and there isn't one, nor is there likely to be in the foreseeable future. Not unless someone invents a way to pull electricity out of thin air.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but car companies wouldn't still be investing BILLIONS of dollars to improve the efficiency of gasoline engines if they thought there was any chance that they would be obsolete in 22 years.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 06:18 PM
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I thought I would mention that I don't have anything against electrics. I think the tech is awesome, and has come a LONG way in the last couple of decades. I just think it will be much closer to 100 years, as opposed to 20, before range and infrastructure reach a level comparable to petrol cars.

Unless some great new battery or generator tech comes along that can move the ball a lot further down the field.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: MteWamp

originally posted by: Spacespider

originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Spacespider

Lol

I wish that'd be true.


Believe it..

news.nationalgeographic.com...


Never going to happen. The phrase "Snowball's chance in hell" comes to mind.

Maybe by 2140.

People won't buy what they don't want. Especially if they are not heavily subsidized.

Gasoline is simply too cheap and readily available, and nothing comes close to matching it's energy density. And that's not even mentioning the fact that gas engines are still getting more efficient all the time. See the OP.

There would have to at least be SOME kind of advantage to buying electric, and there isn't one, nor is there likely to be in the foreseeable future. Not unless someone invents a way to pull electricity out of thin air.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but car companies wouldn't still be investing BILLIONS of dollars to improve the efficiency of gasoline engines if they thought there was any chance that they would be obsolete in 22 years.


With the increase of energy density in super capacitors as well as some newer battery technologies, both of which are lighter weight than what they replace, I suspect that there will be a much larger market for electric cars especially if energy storage can be done with a fuel cell of some type that can recharge the caps in low demand periods while driving.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 07:21 AM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof

originally posted by: MteWamp

originally posted by: Spacespider

originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Spacespider

Lol

I wish that'd be true.


Believe it..

news.nationalgeographic.com...


Never going to happen. The phrase "Snowball's chance in hell" comes to mind.

Maybe by 2140.

People won't buy what they don't want. Especially if they are not heavily subsidized.

Gasoline is simply too cheap and readily available, and nothing comes close to matching it's energy density. And that's not even mentioning the fact that gas engines are still getting more efficient all the time. See the OP.

There would have to at least be SOME kind of advantage to buying electric, and there isn't one, nor is there likely to be in the foreseeable future. Not unless someone invents a way to pull electricity out of thin air.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but car companies wouldn't still be investing BILLIONS of dollars to improve the efficiency of gasoline engines if they thought there was any chance that they would be obsolete in 22 years.


With the increase of energy density in super capacitors as well as some newer battery technologies, both of which are lighter weight than what they replace, I suspect that there will be a much larger market for electric cars especially if energy storage can be done with a fuel cell of some type that can recharge the caps in low demand periods while driving.


Solar panels or being able to absorb ambient RF energy from mobile basestations. MIT was proposing wifi-tricity.



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

So was Tesla....

You saw how that worked out.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 07:11 PM
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never going to work , to many moving parts ....useless



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