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Nasa slams Elon Musk’s SpaceX for launching a Tesla car into the heavens

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posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 06:17 PM
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It is pure marketing, and so what? The payload had to be almost a few tons, and would have been slabs of concrete.
The car is a lot sexier than a slab of concrete, so If he wants to donate his car, what is wrong with a little class?




posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

I'm not a scientist, but isn't it corrosive there? Just a harmful climate in general.

I think it's neat to see something you and I have access to her and see it there.. you can almost relate



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: BotheLumberJack

How do you feel about mining asteroids? Considering it costs roughly $10,000/lb to lug something in LEO.



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 09:04 PM
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originally posted by: GraffikPleasure
a reply to: SaturnFX

I'm not a scientist, but isn't it corrosive there? Just a harmful climate in general.

I think it's neat to see something you and I have access to her and see it there.. you can almost relate


Well, the car itself isn't going to mars..it was originally meant to orbit mars for basically eternity, but it overshot so now its going nowhere in particular. Gonna go take a drive near the asteroid belt, then swing back and from there...not sure, but not mars. It is meant to come sort of close in 2020, but it will never get close enough to orbit according to trajectories.

And in space...no oxygen, so no oxidation.
Fun fact...you won't rot in space. You will either freeze or mummify, but never rot (unless you had a space suit on, in which case you would rot as long as the oxygen last)



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

Omg. . Duh, totally didn't even think about needing oxygen Lol, thanks



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: BotheLumberJack

And NASA is pure as the driven snow when it comes to all the space trash up there?

One roadster to how many tons of NASA debris?



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 12:45 AM
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originally posted by: GraffikPleasure
a reply to: BotheLumberJack

How do you feel about mining asteroids? Considering it costs roughly $10,000/lb to lug something in LEO.


According to what I know, there are statistics that show that the estimated profits from the asteroids are considered the most cost effective to mine. The valuable materials presented on asteroid Ryugu for example have a total value of 82.76 billion U.S. dollars. So I would say if done right sure, it could be a very good investment in the long run of it.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 12:48 AM
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a reply to: ABNARTY

I think NASA's chip has been knocked off it's shoulder by Musk, and now it's scrambling to take control of who's allowed and what. It would be wise if people paid close attention or they'll own this market and using their rules only.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 01:08 AM
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originally posted by: Athetos
What's one roadster really when there are hundreds of derelict satellites.

Not even counting space rocks.

a reply to: BotheLumberJack



Yeah their whining has reached the outerlimits of space with this one.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 01:46 AM
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Again I would urge people to actually read the original article and read the actual words spoken by the NASA spokesperson.

The scientific community is governed by standards in terms of what you do when you launch vehicles into space - particularly when it involves heading towards other planets.

The private space industry is not.

That lack of control puts the work of those agencies that have to abide by a set of rules at risk if there is no communication and collaboration. Lisa Pratt is calling for that communication and collaboration.

She specifically says that they are not trying to stop other launchers, but to help them do it properly:



We have to do it in a way that assists missions, and we don’t look like some kind of sheriff’s department that is constantly coming down on the missions.”


So she is specifically not saying they want to control access to space.

The article states:



She called for more collaboration with commercial ventures on the issue


Where is that saying NASA is 'slamming' anyone or not letting anyone else into the business?

The discussion of 'space debris' above isn't even mentioned in the article, but the point is that the world's space agencies know where their debris is - if anyone is launching hundreds of cubesats at a time in whatever orbit they choose how do they keep track of potential dangers?

Her comments weren't even any kind of formal presentation, they were either made as part of a 15 minute 'meet and greet' session of the committee at which she was present:

smd-prod.s3.amazonaws.com...

or in response to questions put in other presentations. The minutes of the meeting aren't available that I can find but it was public.

People should really check their facts about whether a story is genuinely reporting what was said and with what intent before firing off opinions based on what someone who wasn't at an event reporting what someone else who also wasn't at an event thinks someone else said.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 01:55 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

I think the majority here would disagree with you. The proof is in the pudding.


Lisa Pratt is calling for that communication and collaboration.


No. Communication and Collaboration isn't done by controlling the market solely on NASA's terms.
edit on 3-3-2018 by BotheLumberJack because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 04:19 AM
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originally posted by: BotheLumberJack
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

I think the majority here would disagree with you. The proof is in the pudding.


They are entitled to do that. Doesn't mean they are correct.





Lisa Pratt is calling for that communication and collaboration.


No. Communication and Collaboration isn't done by controlling the market solely on NASA's terms.


No. Read what she actually said, not what you would prefer to think that she said.

NASA is not the only national government space agency. It is arguably not even the most important one at the moment.

Who launched the last supply ship to the ISS? Whose space craft brought the last crew home? Who launched the largest rocket since the Saturn V recently? Who was the most recent space agency to land anything on the moon? Which space agency landed on a comet?

People's obsession with NASA is totally out of proportion with their actual influence.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 04:23 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo


People's obsession with NASA is totally out of proportion with their actual influence.


You can blame NASA for that.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 04:34 AM
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originally posted by: BotheLumberJack
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo


People's obsession with NASA is totally out of proportion with their actual influence.


You can blame NASA for that.


I don't. I blame people's biased, uninformed prejudices.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 05:02 AM
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Fantastically huge bunch of sour grapes to nasa (No Actual Science Aloud).
If nasa had been a private company with that sort of money, it would have been on Mars ten years after the moon.
Good luck to Mr. Musk and his team.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 05:06 AM
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Hope the gas tank is full.




posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 06:45 AM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo

originally posted by: BotheLumberJack
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo


People's obsession with NASA is totally out of proportion with their actual influence.


You can blame NASA for that.


I don't. I blame people's biased, uninformed prejudices.


Blaming people for uninformed prejudices based on what exactly?



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: burgerbuddy
Hope the gas tank is full.



If it's not full we'll hear about it.



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 06:47 AM
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a reply to: pikestaff

I agree



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 07:30 AM
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originally posted by: BotheLumberJack

originally posted by: GraffikPleasure
a reply to: BotheLumberJack

How do you feel about mining asteroids? Considering it costs roughly $10,000/lb to lug something in LEO.


According to what I know, there are statistics that show that the estimated profits from the asteroids are considered the most cost effective to mine. The valuable materials presented on asteroid Ryugu for example have a total value of 82.76 billion U.S. dollars. So I would say if done right sure, it could be a very good investment in the long run of it.


Absolutely, the problem though would be flooding the market, because once one group does it, others will start and then the there's no profit. But that may help with another space race in the mean time.

Still, finding a cheaper, efficient way to space travel is the first issue to me.



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