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Doctor illegally gave patient data to Big Pharma to push unnecessary drugs

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posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 10:21 AM
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Dr. Eduardo Montana, 55, pleaded guilty in a Boston court hearing to disclosing 280 patients’ “individually identifiable health information”

Aegerion conspired to surreptitiously gather patient data in order to determine their suitability for the product. Juxtapid, which received FDA approval in 2012, is only suitable for use for patients with a rare lipid disorder. However, both defendants willingly targeted patients that did not suffer from the condition. After providing patient data, Montana requested a $236,000 grant from Aegerion, which the company declined.
Source

Pharmaceutical company Aegerion was producing a drug known as Juxtapid, which is only used in the treatment of a rare disorder. Aegerion, however, decided they wanted to make some more money... So they conspired with doctors to illegally collect patient data in order to target and trick patients into taking Juxtapid, even when it was doing absolutely nothing for them whatsoever.
I think any pharmaceutical company found guilty of this should be immediately forced to cease all operations indefinitely, as well as face hefty criminal charges. People are taking medications they shouldn't be taking and having their health and lives put at risk simply to make a few people rich. Pharmaceutical companies have literally become drug cartels.




posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: trollz

The doctor should have a settlement to pay to each patient, I would assume. If he gets to keep his license, he will also pay penalties and undergo a few years of supervision from the state authority.

The research company should be penalized heavily, and any executives knowingly recieving unapproved information should face legal consequences (patients rights violations), as well as being financially liable to each patient exposed.

That side....caveat emptor. DOn't take meds as prescribed without knowing what you are taking, and why. Inform yourself. You don't have to be a doctor to follow some basic chemistry, or to research function.



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


That side....caveat emptor. DOn't take meds as prescribed without knowing what you are taking, and why. Inform yourself. You don't have to be a doctor to follow some basic chemistry, or to research function.


Even that's becoming increasingly more difficult to do... many doctors now will drop you if you do not take the medications they prescribe as prescribed, with mandatory urine and/or blood tests to confirm. It just happened with one of my husband's co-workers who has Diabetes. I've been told insurance companies are adopting the practice as well, but I don't know that personally. Wouldn't surprise me though -- if not now then later.



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 11:29 AM
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Ah yes, big pharma and doctors without a moral compass. What could possibly go wrong?


Doctors get rich from controversial drug maker as patients become addicts



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 11:39 AM
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How about the company and the doctor each completely liquidate their assets and divide the resulting cash among the affected patients?

Might dissuade other companies and doctors from similar practices.



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

I've no issue finding a new doctor.


My current physician is new for me, and im still training him. I have the benefit of using Baylor's Scott and White system, so there's a never ending supply of good physicians using a good system. Prior, i used a doctor that I was also personal friends with (we moved).



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 12:22 PM
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originally posted by: MindBodySpiritComplex
Ah yes, big pharma and doctors without a moral compass. What could possibly go wrong?


Doctors get rich from controversial drug maker as patients become addicts


This issue only exists in one first world nation...



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 12:24 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Boadicea

I've no issue finding a new doctor.


My current physician is new for me, and im still training him. I have the benefit of using Baylor's Scott and White system, so there's a never ending supply of good physicians using a good system. Prior, i used a doctor that I was also personal friends with (we moved).


I envy you! Doctors -- especially GPs -- have been in short supply here, especially in rural parts... although I think it's getting better. Many doctors weren't even taking new patients for a long time, so if you lost yours for whatever reason, your options were urgent care or the ER. My sister-in-law RN told us at one point to take advantage of the lull during summer months for any doctor visits we needed -- while the snowbirds and the university students were gone!



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: trollz

My recent experience with online pharma involves a Govt. agency providing medical data to ??? . But ,the telephone solicitation as a follow up to that data has links to either India or Pakistan call centers . They are very concerned about my back pain that I briefly mentioned to a case worker in said Govt. agency .

After receiving numerous annoying calls I finally did a 360 and said I no longer had any pain . Hopefully the calls will stop .



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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Every time I see someone deny that US doctors benefit from deals with Big Pharma I just want to pull my hair out. Why do you think those companies send drug reps to the hospitals and doctor's offices? They *want* those doctors to push those drugs as much as possible no matter how expensive they are.

Just reading about the corruption surrounding the pushing of pain meds to people until they're addicted and can't stop taking them is a huge red flag that the whole system is rotten from the core out. That right there is a swamp that needs draining *now.*



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 06:27 PM
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i bet this happens on a massive scale. Just look at the Opioid crisis which happened with the collusion of our elected representatives who knew exactly what they were doing. We aren't hearing much about that since it came out are we? The people truly responsible for engineering society are basically untouchable. The movie "Michael Clayton" really does a good job of illustrating how it would be possible for a private company, in the movies case a giant pharmaceutical company, to pay off important people and place key players where they are needed to secure their goals.



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