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How Toxic Is Your Town?

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posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 02:36 PM
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I stumbled upon a site that shows just how much the EPA deems your State/Area/Town a toxic paradise. So, as any curious person, I took a closer look.


From the looks of it, the US as a whole isn't that pretty of a picture. Though, there are some places better than others. Let's look at my hometown.

Enhance...
Enhance...
Enhance...

Meh... The state itself looks pretty bad but not as bad as Texas. Zooming in, I can see the colors change a bit so some places are worse than others. Ahh... But wait! There are different types of pollutions. Still not 'home' yet so taking a closer look still.

Enhance...
Enhance...
Enhance...

So it's not as bad as the state overall. It's a bit milder. So perhaps everything is really ok. Errr Maybe not. Land is great. Water perfect. Ahhh... Air pollution is really out there, most likely from all of the refineries in a near by city. Ok, so it's time to move.

New Mexico looks good.

Enhance...
Enhance...
Enhance...

Nope.

How about...

Nope.

Or...

Nope.

Awe hell. No safe place in sight


Check the Map - See how bad it is in your area.

To view a summary of Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data, select search parameters within the top two rows or query the map directly. In addition to viewing the maps based on releases, you can also view the maps based on "RSEI risk-screening scores." RSEI risk-screening scores are estimates of potential human health risk generated by EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model. These unitless scores represent relative human health risk from chronic exposures to TRI chemicals and allow one to compare RSEI scores across locations.



Good Luck!




posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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Never noticed just how big Alaska is! Purchased for 7.2 million dollars quite the steal as they say.
Seems just as red as Texas too!

a reply to: StallionDuck



posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

You can kinda take your pick on what poison you want near you... Not many places are "clean" if it isn't PCBs or some plastic it'll be fertiliser or some other waste products of our glorious industrial past.

Back in the day... Before empire. We recycled a lot more. We still ruined rivers and fields, but then we were pretty clueless. Our impact was very much local.

These days? Acid rain is a bitch... And it ain't funny that it's one of our lesser problems in regards to environmental resilience.



posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: StallionDuck
I stumbled upon a site that shows just how much the EPA deems your State/Area/Town a toxic paradise. So, as any curious person, I took a closer look.


From the looks of it, the US as a whole isn't that pretty of a picture. Though, there are some places better than others. Let's look at my hometown.

Enhance...
Enhance...
Enhance...

Meh... The state itself looks pretty bad but not as bad as Texas. Zooming in, I can see the colors change a bit so some places are worse than others. Ahh... But wait! There are different types of pollutions. Still not 'home' yet so taking a closer look still.

Enhance...
Enhance...
Enhance...

So it's not as bad as the state overall. It's a bit milder. So perhaps everything is really ok. Errr Maybe not. Land is great. Water perfect. Ahhh... Air pollution is really out there, most likely from all of the refineries in a near by city. Ok, so it's time to move.

New Mexico looks good.

Enhance...
Enhance...
Enhance...

Nope.

How about...

Nope.

Or...

Nope.

Awe hell. No safe place in sight


Check the Map - See how bad it is in your area.

To view a summary of Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data, select search parameters within the top two rows or query the map directly. In addition to viewing the maps based on releases, you can also view the maps based on "RSEI risk-screening scores." RSEI risk-screening scores are estimates of potential human health risk generated by EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model. These unitless scores represent relative human health risk from chronic exposures to TRI chemicals and allow one to compare RSEI scores across locations.



Good Luck!



Cool!

I should move back to Steamboat springs Co. It has a lot of 0's.

Northern Vermont isn't too bad, either.

It's gotta be better than living near the Pearl River Delta.







posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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Mines rates as clean, but there's PCBS in the water surrounding. Sources sayw hile other toxic concerns are declining PCBs are not.

a reply to: RAY1990

I think that's the problem here, PCBs likely aren't being measured by any scales. Nor is most of Flint-like water pollution beyond studies.



posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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All 0's.



posted on Feb, 28 2018 @ 07:41 PM
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I wonder how weird it would be if I wore the whole personal protection get-up...maybe I could start designing hazmat fashion.



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 12:30 AM
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Well, just as I thought, a very dark red. We have a couple of power plants, a couple of mines, and old mining industry and business industries that had little regulation years ago. I like having our own power plants though, it is more secure than having power hauled three hundred miles through power lines that can be wiped out by a tornado.

It is much easier to breath here than in the cities where the color is lighter. I think these people do not have a clue about reality. The air is pretty fresh here most times.



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 12:40 AM
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Area I am looking at buying a house less than 1 lbs per sq mile, the area I am looking to unload a house is a major city so as expected toxic.

EDIT: In all honesty I expected Oklahoma to be a lot worse than it appears on that map, considering how prevalent oil and natural gas is.
edit on 1-3-2018 by Irishhaf because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

You gave a better comment for my OP title. I like yours more.

"Pick your poison".



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 01:02 PM
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Oil and gas is pretty safe unless you dump it on the ground. Refining, on the other hand, releases lots of nasty stuff in the air. Most rigs I've been on are very much on top of their game when it comes to "not one drop spilled". They go through some serious paperwork with OSHA and the EPA if there is any kind of spill. No one wants to do paperwork


I'll stress... MOST rigs. There are a few mom and pop rigs that aren't so clean.



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 01:08 PM
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All 0's here it's just with the wind all the crap from Chicongo coming this way that tries to kill us.


edit on 1-3-2018 by mikell because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2018 @ 01:55 PM
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Hmm seems E colorado and the mountains safest



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 04:40 AM
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The area I live in seems pretty good as far as toxicity in the environment. Apparently.

The environment isn't as bad as many other places but many of the people leave a lot to be desired as far as toxicity is concerned. (I'm not from here. This is just a stop along the journey of my life.)



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 06:26 AM
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Here is the problem with TRI- the government "hopes" the industries reporting these numbers are reporting them honestly.

Further, there are legacy problems (i.e. old landfills and dumpsites) that for various reasons, are ignored in the TRI reports.

Still, it's better than nothing.



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: CharlieAtTheGap

I checked Oxford, Ohio. I agree with you because it only listed Schneider Electrical (formerly Square D). They make electrical fuse boxes. Their worst pollution is of course the painting of those boxes.

But absolutely zero mention of Miami University which has had many releases of chemicals from their chemistry labs. One building in particular has only four leaf covers (you can find 5, 6 or 7 as well) but very rarely find a typical three leaf clover. The town itself has been irradiated as they used to have a (very secret) shop that milled depleted uranium and a Nike missle silo outside of town. Not to count the farms around and the chemical runoff from the fields.



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 08:24 AM
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Ahabstar- do a search for: "OLDSWLF database spreadsheet" Ohio EPA

That will get you a lot closer to the truth of what lies under the surface in Butler Co.

This is also a decent link:

epa.ohio.gov...



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

small sir but i like looking at maps lol..







 
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