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Any electricians here?

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posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:27 PM
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The simple answer is no.

All of the wires are separated by air in the Transformers.

You need transformers every time you need to lower the voltage.

The copper in your house is connected to aluminum wire but the direct link is broken by the transformer.

P




posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem
I just climbed on the roof and peed on it and nothing happened.


Where do you live?
Somebody is shtting on my air conditioner. Best way to do it is from the roof.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: OveRcuRrEnteD

Yeah, high voltage lines scare me. My brother's bucket truck pushed a tree limb into a regular line on a road, it probably stopped his heart, but he was knocked unconscious for 30 minutes and had half his body lock up like a stroke to the face randomly over the following week after.

Nothing more eerie than the buzz sound when walking under it it makes me want to army crawl past it. Especially after reading the story about the multi million dollar race horse insurance claim.
12 horses, I think, all over a million each were found dead. Turns out it was foggy that night and the electricity jumped through the fog and electrocuted all of them across 50ft or more of an air gap.

Holy crap, where's the conspiracy, I'm jonesin?



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Isn't it seperated by that toxic goo crap? I remember a big hazmat cleanup on a highway crash with a truck hauling it.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:40 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

No. There is oil or other material used to control the heat that is generated within the transformer.

Your car uses water for the same job ... the water does not mix with the gas in the engine ... unless something is amiss.

P



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:42 PM
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All house wiring here is copper to the breaker. The breaker is plugged onto the buss-bar of the panel which is an aluminum and probably silver alloy. That buss usually is fed directly from connectors under the meter. Connectors to the top of the meter are connected by aluminum service feeders connected to the transformer on the pole. The feeder to the transformer runs through a fuse link made of aluminum silver alloy and is connected to the 13,000 volt transmission line via a brass clamping device. Old rural 13,000 use to be copper but are now strung with aluminum with a steel core for strength. Copper thieves use to steal the copper utility line secondary so they now use aluminum exclusively.

Edit: Pheonix is correct in that there is an air gap, actually the transformer is oil filled, between the primary and secondary windings in the transformer.
edit on 24-2-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-2-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:06 AM
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originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD
I've wired houses and installed the service cable from the breaker box to the distribution wire from the transformer. The utility company has to make and break that connection where I live. Mandroid is correct in that the wires from the breaker box to the transformer in residential connections here in the US is almost always aluminum. Transmission wire(the high voltage stuff) at the top of the pole and on the big towers is aluminum, usually with a steel core for strength. Almost all residential wiring inside is copper nowadays. Depending on the Electrical Code in certain areas of the country aluminum wiring might be acceptable. There were alot of houses during the 1970s in my area that were wired with aluminum. I don't know what they were thinking. It can turn into a very unsafe situation over time due to the wire heating under load and then cooling. Many cycles like that stress the connections which causes more heat and eventually it fails. Hope this helps


A mix of copper and aluminum wiring can actually cause dielectric corrosion. That corrosion can cause overheating, leading to fires. This is commonly known.

Peeing on them does NOT help.



Yea, electrolysis is a problem when devices are replaced with the wrong stuff or copper wiring is added incorrectly.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: Mandroid7



Holy crap, where's the conspiracy, I'm jonesin?

There's one really close. I think it's around 60hz.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:12 AM
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originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD

originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD
I've wired houses and installed the service cable from the breaker box to the distribution wire from the transformer. The utility company has to make and break that connection where I live. Mandroid is correct in that the wires from the breaker box to the transformer in residential connections here in the US is almost always aluminum. Transmission wire(the high voltage stuff) at the top of the pole and on the big towers is aluminum, usually with a steel core for strength. Almost all residential wiring inside is copper nowadays. Depending on the Electrical Code in certain areas of the country aluminum wiring might be acceptable. There were alot of houses during the 1970s in my area that were wired with aluminum. I don't know what they were thinking. It can turn into a very unsafe situation over time due to the wire heating under load and then cooling. Many cycles like that stress the connections which causes more heat and eventually it fails. Hope this helps


A mix of copper and aluminum wiring can actually cause dielectric corrosion. That corrosion can cause overheating, leading to fires. This is commonly known.

Peeing on them does NOT help.



Yea, electrolysis is a problem when devices are replaced with the wrong stuff or copper wiring is added incorrectly.


We have the same problem with advanced fighter aircraft; dissimilar metals bonding in humid climates.

We tried peeing on them.

It didn't work.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:17 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150
ever since I grabbed a positive grounded electric cattle fence while hiking up a creek with my friend around 11 years old I don't pee anywhere near anything that even resembles metal.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:17 AM
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If your new op is about spying via house wiring back to it's source, forget it. You would be closer to reality looking into smart meters. They transmit data via radio frequency.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:22 AM
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originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD

originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD
I've wired houses and installed the service cable from the breaker box to the distribution wire from the transformer. The utility company has to make and break that connection where I live. Mandroid is correct in that the wires from the breaker box to the transformer in residential connections here in the US is almost always aluminum. Transmission wire(the high voltage stuff) at the top of the pole and on the big towers is aluminum, usually with a steel core for strength. Almost all residential wiring inside is copper nowadays. Depending on the Electrical Code in certain areas of the country aluminum wiring might be acceptable. There were alot of houses during the 1970s in my area that were wired with aluminum. I don't know what they were thinking. It can turn into a very unsafe situation over time due to the wire heating under load and then cooling. Many cycles like that stress the connections which causes more heat and eventually it fails. Hope this helps


A mix of copper and aluminum wiring can actually cause dielectric corrosion. That corrosion can cause overheating, leading to fires. This is commonly known.

Peeing on them does NOT help.



Yea, electrolysis is a problem when devices are replaced with the wrong stuff or copper wiring is added incorrectly.


We have the same problem with advanced fighter aircraft; dissimilar metals bonding in humid climates.

We tried peeing on them.

It didn't work.


Try peeing penetrox. Penetrox A Anti-Oxidants are electrical joint compounds that ensure a proper electrical connection between aluminum and copper metal parts



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: CharlesT

It is possible to send data over house wiring. Not so sure about the higher voltages of primary or transmission but it doesn't seem likely to me. just look at the twisted pairs of data wiring, crazy stuff just to keep the signal coherent and bit errors down.

edit on 2/25/2018 by OveRcuRrEnteD because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:31 AM
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originally posted by: CharlesT

originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD

originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD
I've wired houses and installed the service cable from the breaker box to the distribution wire from the transformer. The utility company has to make and break that connection where I live. Mandroid is correct in that the wires from the breaker box to the transformer in residential connections here in the US is almost always aluminum. Transmission wire(the high voltage stuff) at the top of the pole and on the big towers is aluminum, usually with a steel core for strength. Almost all residential wiring inside is copper nowadays. Depending on the Electrical Code in certain areas of the country aluminum wiring might be acceptable. There were alot of houses during the 1970s in my area that were wired with aluminum. I don't know what they were thinking. It can turn into a very unsafe situation over time due to the wire heating under load and then cooling. Many cycles like that stress the connections which causes more heat and eventually it fails. Hope this helps


A mix of copper and aluminum wiring can actually cause dielectric corrosion. That corrosion can cause overheating, leading to fires. This is commonly known.

Peeing on them does NOT help.



Yea, electrolysis is a problem when devices are replaced with the wrong stuff or copper wiring is added incorrectly.


We have the same problem with advanced fighter aircraft; dissimilar metals bonding in humid climates.

We tried peeing on them.

It didn't work.


Try peeing penetrox. Penetrox A Anti-Oxidants are electrical joint compounds that ensure a proper electrical connection between aluminum and copper metal parts


Tried that.

My balls became diametrically charged. The magnetic attraction forced my testicles into bonding with our cast iron tub. I peed Penetrox for two weeks.

On the bright side... I always know which way is north....



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: OveRcuRrEnteD

Right! High voltage transmission lines continually step up to incomprehensibly high voltages all of the way back to the generation sources. I suspect induced magnetic fields in these lines would prevent data transmission completely.
edit on 25-2-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 01:36 AM
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a reply to: CharlesT

Signal transmission of data packets through wires is a really weird thing. I wouldn't rule it out even over high voltage wires. I just don't think it's likely. But, I'm no engineer or scientist.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 03:00 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

You can. If you manage to jump that high while taking a leak, you should be okay in terms of electrical shock. Just aim away before you hit the ground.



Like AMPTAH wrote correctly, transformers are galvanic elements. But there is a but....in most cases, there is no transformer between your house and the street poles. The main transformer that sets the voltage down normaly serves multiple houses / a whole street / street block, depending on the wiring and local conditions.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 03:06 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe
I was wondering why you ask...

Do you get strange noises out of a babyphone/something similar that uses the house wiring to get it´s signal across the rooms? Maybe some kind of powerline adapter?

If so, yes, it is possible that the whole neighborhood can listen to your conversations while those non-wireless babyphones are on, if they have a similar appliance that listens for those overlayed frequencies on the wires.

You can get a filter kit to prevent this from happening.



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 05:17 AM
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You can buy ethernet through mains adapters aka powerline networking, but these usually won't go past the breaker or transformer



posted on Feb, 25 2018 @ 06:08 AM
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a reply to: Jubei42

They definitly go past a common breaker as it´s nothing else than a wire that melts at a certain amperage. What those powerline adapters can´t to is traverse phases. Transformers can be upgraded to do so (traverse powerline signals), it has been done in parts of Germany in the early 2000s, that´s how I know.



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