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Any electricians here?

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posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:25 PM
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I post this question because of a underlying conspiracy I have that I will make another thread on depending on answers.

So do most/all houses have copper wire running through the house that also connects to copper running to electrical poles on the street?

Simplified, does the copper in a house directly connect to copper from utilities?




posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:29 PM
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Home builder here not electrician, but from what I've seen the answer is no.

Everything is aluminum (i think, its silver) from your breaker box, to thr outside meter, and then again from the meter to the transformer, and the transformer to the power line. Everything after the circuit breakers that feeds outlet and lights are copper, some 240v for stoves, dryers etc I have seen copper or alumimum used.

edit on 2 by Mandroid7 because: added



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe

Simplified, does the copper in a house directly connect to copper from utilities?


There are transformers at various places along the way from your house copper to the power station. So, no direct copper link. Magnetic fields interrupt the copper wiring at various places.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:32 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe
I post this question because of a underlying conspiracy I have that I will make another thread on depending on answers.

So do most/all houses have copper wire running through the house that also connects to copper running to electrical poles on the street?

Simplified, does the copper in a house directly connect to copper from utilities?
Yes. Pretty much. There are breakers and the meter in the same line, but the lines from the poles are connected to the lines going into your house.
edit on 24-2-2018 by Woodcarver because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:36 PM
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The 230 line that runs from the pole to your house is probably aluminum. The common wire on the outside is exposed . its silver gray colored



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem
The 230 line that runs from the pole to your house is probably aluminum. The common wire on the outside is exposed . its silver gray colored


NEVER pee on that one.

Ever.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:39 PM
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Are you going to at least share your conspiracy?



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:40 PM
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It is induced voltage. There is a transformer on the pole, it had coils in it that create current in your house. The voltage makes a loop to and from the pole and into and through your house. It is sort of like a gear driving another gear. The voltage of the high power lines is way higher than the stuff in your home. Some of the power left over goes to the powerstation through the ground if I remember right, ground currents are created. Your meter measures how much power you use by measuring how much of the power is induced in the circuit.

It's late, I may have that a little off. I worked with my cousin who was a master electrician and he explained it to me while we wired houses one time while I was working towards my journeymans card. I never got my card, I had the hours, trouble is that I was building houses and working under him but there was no money trail in the right direction, He offered me his master electrician license, but I would have had to have a journeyman on the job at all times. I like learning, that was good enough for me, he taught me a lot of stuff, so did the electrical inspector, we talked about all sorts of things when he came to inspect the jobs. He was going to sign for the rest of the hours if I took some of his classes for continuing education of licensees, but it didn't work out.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:46 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
It is induced voltage. There is a transformer on the pole, it had coils in it that create current in your house. The voltage makes a loop to and from the pole and into and through your house. It is sort of like a gear driving another gear. The voltage of the high power lines is way higher than the stuff in your home. Some of the power left over goes to the powerstation through the ground if I remember right, ground currents are created. Your meter measures how much power you use by measuring how much of the power is induced in the circuit.

It's late, I may have that a little off. I worked with my cousin who was a master electrician and he explained it to me while we wired houses one time while I was working towards my journeymans card. I never got my card, I had the hours, trouble is that I was building houses and working under him but there was no money trail in the right direction, He offered me his master electrician license, but I would have had to have a journeyman on the job at all times. I like learning, that was good enough for me, he taught me a lot of stuff, so did the electrical inspector, we talked about all sorts of things when he came to inspect the jobs. He was going to sign for the rest of the hours if I took some of his classes for continuing education of licensees, but it didn't work out.


So... long story. Don't pee on it.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

From wiki



A transformer is an electrical device that transfers electrical energy between two or more circuits through electromagnetic induction. A varying current in one coil of the transformer produces a varying magnetic field, which in turn induces a varying electromotive force (emf) or "voltage" in a second coil. Power can be transferred between the two coils through the magnetic field, without a metallic connection between the two circuits. Faraday's law of induction discovered in 1831 described this effect. Transformers are used to increase or decrease the alternating voltages in electric power applications.


I never knew what was going on in a transformer. That is pretty interesting.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Copper is too expensive


if anything it'll be copper coated materials.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Yeah, thats no joke, a primary will kill you and weld you to it. It will probably blow off the tips of your fingers and toes.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
a reply to: madmac5150

Yeah, thats no joke, a primary will kill you and weld you to it. It will probably blow off the tips of your fingers and toes.


My wife wants to know if it will regrow hair.

Not important to me, but, if it keeps mama happy....



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 10:59 PM
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I just climbed on the roof and peed on it and nothing happened.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:01 PM
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whatcha thinkin Vasa Croe....actually the ground wire does not connect to the generator...weird...

we only get the lines....two for 220 and 110 three wires for 480 three phase

so the ground wire we just stick in the ground and bamm....hooked up....where ever you're at or where ever ya want stick that one side of 110 volts in the friggin dirt.....further the better to permanently moist soil if possible.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Hahas, idk maybe.

Christ, it neutralizes snake bites, I just learned on here the other day.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:07 PM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem
I just climbed on the roof and peed on it and nothing happened.


I just tried the same thing.

All I could hear was my wife.... bitching about some a$$hole peeing on the roof.



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:14 PM
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I've wired houses and installed the service cable from the breaker box to the distribution wire from the transformer. The utility company has to make and break that connection where I live. Mandroid is correct in that the wires from the breaker box to the transformer in residential connections here in the US is almost always aluminum. Transmission wire(the high voltage stuff) at the top of the pole and on the big towers is aluminum, usually with a steel core for strength. Almost all residential wiring inside is copper nowadays. Depending on the Electrical Code in certain areas of the country aluminum wiring might be acceptable. There were alot of houses during the 1970s in my area that were wired with aluminum. I don't know what they were thinking. It can turn into a very unsafe situation over time due to the wire heating under load and then cooling. Many cycles like that stress the connections which causes more heat and eventually it fails. Hope this helps



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7
the catenary wires that run the trains is the one you don't even want to look at too hard



posted on Feb, 24 2018 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: OveRcuRrEnteD
I've wired houses and installed the service cable from the breaker box to the distribution wire from the transformer. The utility company has to make and break that connection where I live. Mandroid is correct in that the wires from the breaker box to the transformer in residential connections here in the US is almost always aluminum. Transmission wire(the high voltage stuff) at the top of the pole and on the big towers is aluminum, usually with a steel core for strength. Almost all residential wiring inside is copper nowadays. Depending on the Electrical Code in certain areas of the country aluminum wiring might be acceptable. There were alot of houses during the 1970s in my area that were wired with aluminum. I don't know what they were thinking. It can turn into a very unsafe situation over time due to the wire heating under load and then cooling. Many cycles like that stress the connections which causes more heat and eventually it fails. Hope this helps


A mix of copper and aluminum wiring can actually cause dielectric corrosion. That corrosion can cause overheating, leading to fires. This is commonly known.

Peeing on them does NOT help.




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