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ISS on the moon.

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posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:26 PM
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So i was thinking. They want to pull the plug out of ISS about 5 years from now. But they want a moonbase in a few years. So why not put ISS on the ground from the moon? We have a lot of clever guys here on ATS that figure that out how to do it? The only problem is that " how we bring it safe and whole on the moon ground" So great minds of ATS, whats your great mind saying?




posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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good eye there....Space-X boys.....yep they could.....

Why, I've seen that bunch in action...they're dynamite
edit on 23-2-2018 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: ni91ck

That would be an interesting disaster

the ISS isn't equipped for landing... its pretty fragile




posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: ni91ck

No, that is not the only problem.

There is also the problem of accelerating the station from 17,000 mph to 25,000 mph in order to leave Earth orbit, while keeping it in one piece.

Oh, also slowing it down once it gets to the Moon.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ni91ck

No, that is not the only problem.

There is also the problem of accelerating the station from 17,000 mph to 25,000 mph in order to leave Earth orbit, while keeping it in one piece.

Oh, also slowing it down once it gets to the Moon.


Buzzkill



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:39 PM
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So Nasa ask you to work it out. Could the job be done? Think out of the box.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: ni91ck

It helps to first have some notion of what is in the box.

Like orbital mechanics, and stuff.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: ni91ck
So Nasa ask you to work it out. Could the job be done? Think out of the box.


First, think about gravity. The Moon has some. About 1/6th of Earth's. So how are you going to get the ISS on the surface of the Moon?
edit on 2/23/2018 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: ni91ck
So i was thinking. They want to pull the plug out of ISS about 5 years from now. But they want a moonbase in a few years. So why not put ISS on the ground from the moon? We have a lot of clever guys here on ATS that figure that out how to do it? The only problem is that " how we bring it safe and whole on the moon ground" So great minds of ATS, whats your great mind saying?


The ISS orbits at about 7.7 km/s (17,000 mph). You need to add about 3.2 km/s (7,000 mph) to that speed. This is called the “delta-v” - delta denotes change in velocity. To do this, you would need a new space craft to provide the needed thrust. And you just couldn’t use the Soyuz (it only would be able to provide around 8% to 12% delta V.
Currently, there is no manned spacecraft that exists, that could provide the necessary thrust. Even the Orion spacecraft is only able to produce about 1,300 m/s of delta-v itself. The Orion’s launch vehicle is needed to launch itself into space. So that eliminates anything manned, to move the ISS. The launch vehicle would have to be assembled at the ISS and then jettisoned when it reaches the Moon (which is still in Earth’s gravity). An additional lander would be needed, and that’s a whole new problem. I’m not saying it’s impossible, I’m just wondering if it’s worth it.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 05:59 PM
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So we have to slowly bring the speed up to 25.000. So iss would not break apart. The perfect timing for a slingshot to the moon. A lot of reverse power for the slow break. Little by little. Gravity is the problem. Could we bring it down piece by piece? You some big thrusters to bring it slowly down.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: Violater1

So the cost are too high. Instead we need some new ideas for making something that works. But you still have troubles. Only small pieces can be landed on the moon. So it takes almost forever too build a moonbase?



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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It's a neat idea and all but it doesn't make sense. It's possible for sure, but the amount of money it would take to equip, prepare and do necessary research/calculations for the ISS to attempt a moon landing, you could build a much more functional structure on the moon.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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If we still had shuttles, a multitude of material could be sent to ISS. I'm sure it could be fortified and thrusters added. It's kind of like bolting a V8 to a lawnmower. Not very practical but somebody will try just to say they did it.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

Like this?



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: Phage




Oh, also slowing it down once it gets to the Moon.


I don't know, I think the moon itself might slow it down



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 07:03 PM
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Maybe if it was deconstructed into smaller parts and landed piece by piece?



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

Like this?

Yup! I was also thinking Tim the Toolman Taylor. More power!



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: mymymy
a reply to: Phage




Oh, also slowing it down once it gets to the Moon.


I don't know, I think the moon itself might slow it down


How?

It does not even have the atmosphere to areobreak in.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: Reydelsol

From 25,000 mph to zero.
On impact.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: ni91ck

Why not just scrap the whole idea and use native materials and an Inflatable habitat, similar to Submersible Portable Inflatable Dwellings used in Oceanic research.

patents.google.com...



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