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A cop's take on the Stoneman Douglas Resource Officer

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posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 11:54 AM
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The below video just went up and the officer touches on a number of things that I've had in mind since the information came out about Stoneman Douglas High School having an armed deputy that stood outside as the shooting happened. These thoughts are all the more powerful since not only do we know that Scott Peterson (who was armed and on duty) stood outside for minutes on end as shots rang out, but we also know that an off-duty and unarmed officer was also on campus at the time. Sgt. Jeff Heinrich was at the school helping repair one of the baseball fields, and when the shooting began he ran towards the school and rendered aid to wounded students. Unarmed and off-duty, he ran towards the gunfire rather than away from it or hiding from it.

A couple of points from the video that I find myself in complete agreement with:

If you're scared to do the job, don't do the job. Period.

School Resource Officers are all too often a "sunset assignment" for an officer to mark time until he feels like retiring. That needs to change.

Had Peterson delayed entry to wait for backup, that would at least be explainable. Depending on policy, some agencies tell their officers that making solo entry into an active shooter situation is a no-go, and they need to wait for at least one other unit. But we know that a) that wasn't what Peterson was doing, and b) that's not the policy. His own Sheriff says he should've made entry and engaged. At a minimum, that would've taken the shooter's focus off students for precious moments.

Peterson was allowed to sign retirement papers after being notified he was going to be suspended. This means Peterson now gets to draw pension for his 32 years with a badge, and quite possibly get hired somewhere else.

Finally, perhaps most galling of all: Peterson now has two armed guards at his residence 24 hours a day because he's worried about death threats and potential retaliation.

Anyway, here's the video:





posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:28 PM
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Utter coward.

I dont think he should face criminal prosecution. The shame of being a coward should be enough of a punishment.

But he should be denied his pension.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

I appreciate your point of view on the subject.

It is tough to see the Deputy be called a flat out coward having faced such a crazy situation.

Without seeing the video or having his articulation it is hard to make a call on it.

The active shooter training I am familiar with says wait for a minimum of three, with four being ideal, before entering. But does this only apply to responding patrol officers? The point of the SRO is to have an officer on hand and able to act immediately but that contradicts common sense when it comes to this situation because you are attempting to engage an individual who has superior firepower. The SRO would have the element of surprise on his/her side if approached correctly I guess.

I would say you are correct that the SRO position is traditionally a place to hide someone who is not exactly willing or able to handle patrol work any longer. Also, the selection criteria for a position like that would be more of someone geared towards conflict resolution and community outreach as opposed to someone who would be good in a tactical situation.

You would think that the SRO would have developed a relationship with the students and staff at the school and that would have compelled him to act more decisively in this situation. It's a tough call and I personally would not call the officer a flat out coward but I do see a problem in his failure to act.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:38 PM
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Nobody can say how they would react to a scary situation like that, with adrenaline flowing and bullets flying. I agree, based on what I have read, that he could have done more but for a bunch of keyboard warriors to sit there and condemn him when they would probably have taken a dump in their pants in that same situation if it were them, is quite pathetic.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

I keep hearing about videos that I never get to see. Anybody else just want the proof? Not your fault, OP, I'm just getting frustrated about "reports" of videos. Of course, if true... well, perhaps it is time to make "serving and protecting" a legal obligation for police officers.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: Kryties
Nobody can say how they would react to a scary situation like that, with adrenaline flowing and bullets flying. I agree, based on what I have read, that he could have done more but for a bunch of keyboard warriors to sit there and condemn him when they would probably have taken a dump in their pants in that same situation if it were them, is quite pathetic.


But he was a cop, not a “keyboard warrior”.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: Kryties
Nobody can say how they would react to a scary situation like that, with adrenaline flowing and bullets flying. I agree, based on what I have read, that he could have done more but for a bunch of keyboard warriors to sit there and condemn him when they would probably have taken a dump in their pants in that same situation if it were them, is quite pathetic.


But he was a cop, not a “keyboard warrior”.


Im talking about posters on this website, and other websites. I thought that was blatantly obvious, clearly not for some.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:48 PM
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Was the action he displayed at one time standard procedure?

I seem to remember that training at one point was to wait for backup?



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: MisterMcKill


I keep hearing about videos that I never get to see. Anybody else just want the proof? Not your fault, OP, I'm just getting frustrated about "reports" of videos.


I agree that it is hard to make a call without seeing the video and hearing his articulation of what his thought process was.


Of course, if true... well, perhaps it is time to make "serving and protecting" a legal obligation for police officers.


I understand the frustration. If we look at this scenario, I don't know if anyone, armed with only a handgun, should be legally compelled to confront a person armed with an AR15. Officers do have a mission to protect people. The officer can force a bad tactical situation and potentially save some lives but the chances of him being ineffective and killed himself are substantial. The other option is to wait for one or two more officers thus increasing the chances of success.

It would be a tough call for anyone to make.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: howtonhawky

Yes it was. That's one of the reasons Columbine was the disaster that it was: at the time, the training was to contain the scene and then, essentially, "take ground." Enter, clear a room, move to the next room, clear it, etc. That's why the response was so slow at Columbine.

Without getting into specifics, the tactic at this point is to make entry as quickly as possible and interdict the shooter as quickly as possible.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

One of the best threads of the day, and a great commentary and perspective--and I'm not just saying that because it aligns with my feelings on Scot Peterson.

What a goddam coward and spineless human being. I was talking with my wife about this issue last night, noting that I'm not 100% sure how I would react in the same situation, and she spoke up and told me that she could not see me refusing to go into that building and doing anything that I could to help those children.

And she's right--I tend to not want to try and sound like I could always play the roll of hero, but there's no way, down to the core of my being, that I could have stood there for minutes listening to every shot and scream, knowing that human beings were being gunned down when I could do something to help. Hell, even if all I did was redirect his attention to me long enough to save a life or two, that would have been a result that I may not have lived with, but my wife could have.

This piss-poor excuse for a human being (and I don't know if he's a father or not, but he better not be) hid behind a f**king concrete column while those he was sworn to serve and protect were getting killed and injured.

If I ever find out where this guy gets buried when he dies, I would not hesitate to piss and spit on his grave at the same time.

I'll just close with a quote from the video:

"I'm done, I'm done. I'm getting myself all pissed off."


edit on 23-2-2018 by SlapMonkey because: fixed a sentence that made it seem like my wife said that I would NOT go into the school in that situation



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:07 PM
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originally posted by: howtonhawky
Was the action he displayed at one time standard procedure?

I seem to remember that training at one point was to wait for backup?


The Sheriff specifically said that this pathetic man absolutely should have entered the school and neutralized (i.e.: Shot the asshole dead) the shooter.

Outdated training has nothing to do with this, but as Shamrock6 notes, it was the SOP in many, if not all, places at one time, and you can see it in action in some of those 70s cop shows.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:07 PM
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originally posted by: Kryties

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: Kryties
Nobody can say how they would react to a scary situation like that, with adrenaline flowing and bullets flying. I agree, based on what I have read, that he could have done more but for a bunch of keyboard warriors to sit there and condemn him when they would probably have taken a dump in their pants in that same situation if it were them, is quite pathetic.


But he was a cop, not a “keyboard warrior”.


Im talking about posters on this website, and other websites. I thought that was blatantly obvious, clearly not for some.


I know exactly what you’re saying. My point is, he chose a career as a public servant LEO. It wasn’t like he’s a rookie. He’s a 32 year veteran.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: UnBreakable

I reckon we all wait until we see the footage that hasn't been released and hear what the man himself has to say about what was going through his head before we all arm ourselves with keyboards and condemn his "cowardice".

What do people say about that? Sounds pretty reasonable to me hey?



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: MisterMcKill


well, perhaps it is time to make "serving and protecting" a legal obligation for police officers.


This sort of thought is based off an erroneous interpretation of case law.

Law enforcement has no obligation to protect you, being a specific person. If your house gets broken in to and your TV is stolen, you can't suit your local PD for not protecting you, specifically.

Law enforcement has an obligation to protect the public, being society.

I'd say a school full of kids would constitute "the public at large." Or an office building full of people. All the more so when the established policy of the agency is "get in the door and #'ing do something about it even if you're alone."



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

Peterson should not lose a retirement package he spent 32 years earning because of a noncriminal lapse in judgement. That is beyond acceptable.

Fired? Sure.

Stripped of his commission? Sure

Made fun of publicly? Sure

But to pull his retirement not only is unjust (and theft), it foists the responsibility for taking care of him onto the public.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:18 PM
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If this event is a false flag event then Sgt. Heinrich was probably warned not to interfere. Now he is being sacrificed and scapegoated.

Lot's of strange things surrounding this mass murder. Since 9/11 it's hard to accept any official story about anything.


edit on 23-2-2018 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I find it sickening when senior military are allowed to retire quietly and keep their retirement checks after they've done something that cost lives.

I find this case no less sickening.

Right or wrong is immaterial to that opinion. It's sickening.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6

If you're scared to do the job, don't do the job. Period.



My father is an officer and I agree with this. I think he would too. I haven't talked to him about it too much because he's seen enough babies suffer and tortured through his career I have a hard time bringing these topics up to him. I think he'd agree though.

While we had a violent and sometimes volatile relationship growing up, I do credit my father with teaching me very basic and natural things that have kept me alive so far. He told me from a young age that Fear is a weakness for many, but that it has the potential to be an incredible strength. He taught me about Fight/Flight/Freeze. If your first reaction is Flight or Freeze, I'm sorry but perhaps something more like unarmed scarecrow security where you aren't allowed to touch anyone and can only observe and report is more your speed.

Now how do we figure what someones response is before it's too late?

I'd like to ask my dad for his input later and I'll share it when I do. His opinion may differ from mine who knows.

Edit to Add: I can't say my reaction would have been to fight. I'd like to think it would have been but I just don't know. I've never been tested in any situation to that extent before. I've gone "guns blazing" into scary situations to help my siblings or my daft friends but never an active shooting situation. I can say though I'd never sign up to be a police officer because I know my limits. I feel badly for this officer for his choice but I am also angry at him. It doesn't matter, HE has to live with it.

-Alee
edit on 2/23/2018 by NerdGoddess because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I find it sickening when senior military are allowed to retire quietly and keep their retirement checks after they've done something that cost lives.

I find this case no less sickening.

Right or wrong is immaterial to that opinion. It's sickening.


I don't disagree that his behavior was sickening.

But 32 years man....32 years of service. He failed once in his twilight years. Maybe its that he was set up for failure (as was mentioned in your OP...its a twilight gig for most). But if he served the public for 32 years without any other black marks on his record, it is unconscionable to steal his retirement from him.

Put another way: if my wife cheated on me after 32 years, I ain't divorcing her over it.




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