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instant gratification!?

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posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 07:52 AM
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Could this be a factor? Our need to have what we want RIGHT NOW! Kids haven't had to wait for much, or young adults for that matter. I don't want to start sounding like Peepa, and order you off my lawn, but back when I was a kid........microwaves had just come out, we had three channels. No internet. If you wanted something, you planned for it, waited for it. A TV show, it will be on Wednesday night at 8. Wait for it. You need to do some research for a school project? Plan to go to the library the next day, and look up the stuff you need on the microfiche.

I don't know that our advancements are a bad thing, I enjoy all the ability to get whatever I would like NOW. But when kids make snap decisions to do something bad, they are used to making decisions that way, because that's how the world works now.

Am I way off on this? maybe, I was just a thought when seeing a commercial and hearing this song.



What do you think?




posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: network dude

amen to that. i remember the good old days, good behavior was rewarded, you had to earn what you got, no entitlement. and patience was virtue because the payoff was gratifying.

the future is bleak for these millenials.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:03 AM
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I think you are dead on. I was just saying to my wife, that I am annoyed if I have to wait a week, or month for a certain new movie to come out. But, back in the day we waited a year or more.

The *I want it NOW* syndrome has taken over big time.

I find myself lost in it, yet missing simpler times.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: network dude

All I hear is the same # happened 40 years ago, only....slower, and more deliberately?

My 5 year old certainly doesn't have my patience.

Nor grammar.

That would be my fault.




posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:18 AM
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originally posted by: sunkuong
a reply to: network dude

All I hear is the same # happened 40 years ago, only....slower, and more deliberately?


Did it though? I just don't remember kids shooting other kids at School. I do remember fights, fist fights. I remember bullys. I remember getting my ass kicked by sister of the kid I decided to bully. But I don't recall even worrying about being shot. We had tornado drills, we even had nuclear drills, where we identified fallout shelters. But no active shooter drills.

Lots of things have changed. Some for the better, some, perhaps not.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Lack of patience and tolerance is conditioned into us. Some of that is by intent.

One way it occurs is thru advertising on TV. Ever notice how they cram as much information into the short commercial time ? That time is expensive so they have to slam you with imagery and noise, fast cutting from one second to another in a cacophony of 'commercialism'.

Same with some programming, like cartoons. Ever watch children cartoons? Flash bang zoom editing.

This teaches our children's developing minds to switch from subject to subject too rapidly, trains the mind to have a short attention span and go 'blank'. This is how brainwashing and ads get past our conscious objection, our cognizance.

Thats the whole intent, to subliminally plant a desire for that fast food burger, new phone, Bling, or political message deep into our heads.

The result is what we see; intolerant, impatient, short attention span minds, bouncing around the world like 'automatons' or 'zombies', seemingly without order or direction.

Its a form of hypnotism, keeps us off balance, vulnerable to the next suggestion inspired by flash bang zoom 'programming'.

By the time we 'grow up' we are good minions, all we need is a little 'direction' to point our way for us.
edit on 23-2-2018 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: network dude



According to this, it is because among other things, we have forgotten how to learn to have patience.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:26 AM
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a reply to: sunkuong

The same stuff did happen in some ways, but patience and social coping were more prevalent. You should look at the video I posted. The guy giving the talk has some great explanations for why things are as messed up as they are. There are several factors for it. Lack of patience is just one.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Star and flag for Queen alone.
You're absolutely right and i weep for this generation. I hope the next generation rectifies what they have done.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: Perfectenemy

I think we all share responsibility here.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: network dude

I truly applaud the thought you are putting in to this issue, and when I first read your OP I was nodding my head in agreement. Every new thing is almost immediately obselete in this technology-driven, fast-paced society. Choices seem to be made very poorly, with no real regard for the present (real world), let alone a future.

Then I realized that most of these bad ones have been planned, some for quite a long time. I don't think that particular issue applies to the horrific phenomenon of mass murder.

Let's keep the dialogue going though, because so many times when this happens we talk, and talk, for a couple of weeks, tweak the legislation, and then forget about it until the next one happens.

I've given it plenty of thought also, and have definitely realized that we are no where near the root of the problem when we are discussing the means used to carry it out while ignoring the impetus.
edit on 23-2-2018 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: zosimov

Yes, but the things that really matter and make a difference -- meaningful relationships like deep friendships or real achievement at a job or activity -- take time and patience and coping to develop.

For some of these kids who snap, sure they may have planned the act, but it may have been the first thing they put real thought and effort into, and the other things I mentioned previously might have stopped them. How many were socially alienated and having just one real friendship might have kept them from the abyss? But the way we raise kids, they don't know how to make those connections and keep them, and not just on the end of the one who snaps, too.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 09:08 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Great points!

Our kids will learn how to cultivate relationships and patience from us. It really is on us to show by example how to work hard for something and achieve it.

I'm sure the screen time, for more reasons than we can fathom, is contributing vastly to the alienation most are suffering today.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 09:18 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: zosimov
But the way we raise kids, they don't know how to make those connections and keep them, and not just on the end of the one who snaps, too.


My friend was just telling me yesterday of a story she had heard of a (now) grown man who had been endlessly harrassed in school and had planned a revenge killing sometime in the 90s. Then one day, one of his classmates threw him a party, cake and all. Changed his whole trajectory. I do think you have a good point here.

I know it sounds almost too easy. But connection is certainly a key here.
edit on 23-2-2018 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: network dude

You are not way off. There is merit in these thoughts.

I would agree it plays a part in the circumstances in which we find ourselves. What percentage of the causality? IDK.

What astonishes me is the lack of ability (or desire) to think something through. To second and third order affects of actions. Granted, that level of contemplation requires time. If we need things "now", then there is no time to think things out.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: ABNARTY

I treat it like I troubleshoot problems. You have to think first, of when it was working. Then try to get the end user to admit what they did at the point it stopped working. If you can gain that knowledge, the fix is usually easy and lasting. But when you are lied to, and told "it was like that when I came in", you have to spend lots of time and effort into making some repairs that just weren't needed to find the root cause.

I don't consider myself special in any way, but I really want people who care enough about this topic to put that kind of thought into it. I am very confident if we all work on this, we can find a solution. And if enough people are willing to try some things, it might make a lasting difference.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: network dude



I feel sorry for them loosing out on the excitement of 'anticipation' prior to

gratification ..... and so often it leads to not fully appreciating the end result.


So often what has been waited/planned/saved for seems/is more valued.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 10:37 AM
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I have a story about this topic. As a kid, I had an issue that I needed to work out. My parents were very helpful. The issue is not important. I was given a calendar and could put a mark on it each day my issue wasn't an issue. My father told me that when I had 30 consecutive marks, I could have whatever I wanted. At the age of 5, my vision of "anything in the world" was a bit limited. I wanted an Evil Knievel riding a motorcycle that you wound up and he would ride.



I did it, made my 30 days! we went out that day to Sears to pick it up. I was so exited! I took it down the street to Troy Smith's house, got him to come out to the street, we wound it up, it took off, oh it was glorious! Majestic even. He drove right into the sewer. First run. Never to be found again. When I think back, I have two thoughts. A Porsche 911 Targa would have been a better choice. And secondly, that one ride was awesome.

But the anticipation was so worth it.



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: network dude

My son is very interested in marking special days on the calendar. He earned some money working in the yard, but I told him he would have to wait until "pay day." He (he's just turned 5) had the idea to make a calendar, and mark the date he was going to get paid. He even drew out a plan for how it would look.

Once he got paid, we marked a day for him to go buy himself a toy, which he did also. He loved it, and the teenage girl working at the register congratulated him on a toy well earned. (cute)

I'm pretty sure it was a worthwhile activity.




edit on 23-2-2018 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2018 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: network dude



If you wanted something, you planned for it


Yep


If you wanted to buy something, you saved up for it. Only thing people considered using credit for was to replace the oven or other appliance that went out. At one time, credit was understood to be a "lending scam" by which you paid back more money than you borrowed, simply for the sake of having something "now" rather than "later" (gives you plenty of time to destroy it before you even actually own it)

Entitlement and impatience will be the death of this country




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