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First possible drone related crash of an aircraft being investigated

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posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 02:10 PM
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A helicopter with a student and instructor on board crashed in South Carolina on Wednesday, and investigators are attempting to determine if a DJI Phantom drone played a role. Both people involved told investigators they were practicing maneuvers 50 feet above a treeline when the drone appeared in front of them. The instructor stated he then took control of the aircraft, and attempted to avoid the drone, resulting in the helicopter impacting trees and making a hard landing.

Investigators haven't been able to confirm that a drone was involved, or identify the possible owner, but DJI says they're ready to assist if needed. If they confirm that a drone was involved, it would be the first time a drone caused an aircraft to crash.

www.engadget.com...

petapixel.com...




posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 04:33 PM
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What if the helicopter went up above the drone and just blew it downward?
Would that be possible?



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 05:44 PM
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originally posted by: JHumm
What if the helicopter went up above the drone and just blew it downward?
Would that be possible?


I don't think it should have been anywhere near at all.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

People need to use their brains, we had a incident recently were a drone got close to the rotors of a fire heli filling up water at a local golf course. It doesn't mention it in the link article but the radio at the time reported that the helicopter had to abandon the lake at that golf course because of one idiot with a drone.link



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy

originally posted by: JHumm
What if the helicopter went up above the drone and just blew it downward?
Would that be possible?


I don't think it should have been anywhere near at all.


I agree , I was just wondering if it would be possible to knock down a drone instead of crashing.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: JHumm

originally posted by: smurfy

originally posted by: JHumm
What if the helicopter went up above the drone and just blew it downward?
Would that be possible?


I don't think it should have been anywhere near at all.


I agree , I was just wondering if it would be possible to knock down a drone instead of crashing.

Too many variables. But even a 3 lbs drone could damage the rotors.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 06:44 PM
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If the drone was operated with assistance from gps satellites would dji have a record?



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: JHumm

Theoretically, but there are a lot of variables.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:12 PM
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originally posted by: oddnutz
If the drone was operated with assistance from gps satellites would dji have a record?


GPS satellites only transmit signals. A drone just picks up the coordinates from the GPS receiver chip.
DJI wouldn't know the flight path of the drone.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:13 PM
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a reply to: KungfuStu

There were several billboards I've seen about not flying near fires, because they have to stop flying if drones are seen near fires.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:47 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: oddnutz
If the drone was operated with assistance from gps satellites would dji have a record?


GPS satellites only transmit signals. A drone just picks up the coordinates from the GPS receiver chip.
DJI wouldn't know the flight path of the drone.


But I thought those receiver devices store the data?



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

Depending on the drone, higher end systems store location data.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Luckily DJI has prepared for situations like this.
Each drone has gps tracking in them.
In the event of a drone contact with an airline, DJI investigates if their product was in the area.
They can then track who was responsible for piloting the drone.
And of course the proper authorities will be contacted.

Each pilot - professional and hobbyists have a responsibility of keeping the airspace safe for manned craft.
It's IDIOTS like that hobbyist, that gives us professionals a bad name in drones.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 07:55 PM
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DP
edit on 17-2-2018 by Macenroe82 because: Double post


That gps tracking is outside of the standard gps that is in the drone.
The drone reports to a program DJI developed called Aeroscope.
DJI developed for authorities to have the ability to identify drones and their pilots when they are flying near sensitive areas - restricted airspace, aerodromes, etc...
But if there is a collision, and the pilot was using a DJI product, then they can tell who the UAV was registered to.
edit on 17-2-2018 by Macenroe82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

It never ceases to amaze me how stupid people are with these things. The video out of Arizona recently is a good example.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Oh I know.
They are marvellous little machines. But in the wrong hands can be catastrophic.
The problem is, people don't think.
They don't recognize that they are sharing the airspace with people's lives.
Nothing but utter stupidity.
I swear as We hear more and more about these close calls, the more I feel that every person who owns a drone, needs to acquire their pilots license like us commercial drone pilots.
It would cut the potential threats down to a fraction.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

They need to do something. I can see them splitting it into high end and low end, and requiring stricter certifications for one. I have one at home that goes to about 300 feet if I want to push it. My brother has one that has the visor to hook to his phone that goes higher.



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82



AeroScope uses the existing communications link between a drone and its remote controller to broadcast identification information such as a registration or serial number, as well as basic telemetry, including location, altitude, speed and direction. Police, security agencies, aviation authorities and other authorized parties can use an AeroScope receiver to monitor, analyze and act on that information. AeroScope has been installed at two international airports since April, and is continuing to test and evaluate its performance in other operational environments.


This is a great idea but how many small airports would pay to install this system?



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: nepatitan

Larger airports are more likely to see drone activity. Most incidents of near misses involving drones seem to be people trying to take pictures and video of the aircraft as they're coming into the airport. Your average plane spotter doesn't care about a Piper Chieftan landing at a small airport. They want that new 787-10, or A350 coming in to New York, or Phoenix.
edit on 2/17/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2018 @ 11:30 PM
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WOW just found this video, that is dangerously close!
Mavic



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