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Real-life mass shootings: the subject Hollywood dare not touch

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posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:45 AM
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Today I had an inspiration and wondered is it a fact that Hollywood rarely makes movies about mass shootings.

And lo and behold this feeling I had seems to be true.




If there is one thing American entertainment does well, it’s bloodshed. Yet few films dare to tackle our gun epidemic – perhaps because there’s no catharsis to be had and no end in sight
In America, our idealism is matched only by our bloodlust. We are a nation hopelessly and endlessly addicted to violence, and as such look for the same in our television shows, our books, and, of course, our movies. That’s why our multiplexes are filled each year with a cavalcade of big-budget shooter flicks and apocalyptic action fare, both real and fictionalised. We (myself included) crowd into theaters and cheer on the pornographic gore of Mad Max: Fury Road and Lone Survivor, the bloodless brutality of Avengers: Age of Ultron, the quasi first-person shooter fantasy of John Wick.


Yet despite that brutality, there has been curiously little space in film devoted to real-life mass shootings. Save for a handful of small indie flicks – the most notable examples being Gus Van Sant’s Elephant and Lynne Ramsay’s We Need to Talk About Kevin – gun-wielding American-bred slaughters are basically non-existent on screen. This is strange, considering how much money Hollywood contributes toward depicting violence.



Indeed for some reason real life gritty movies about mass shootings rarely get Hollywood's attention.

Umm....
Perhaps they are afraid to be labeled a part of the problem.




A 2013 study found that in the last 30 years, gun violence has tripled in PG-13 movies, with 94% of the most popular projects containing at least one violent scene. And while tragedies like 9/11 receive the big screen treatment (Oliver Stone’s World Trade Center, United 93) – getting mined for every bloody detail, wrung from it every last drip of emotional juice – none of that cash is being devoted to portraying our society’s gun epidemic.

Has the Harvey Weinstein influence taken effect? Some background: in 2014, the studio head behind such fare as Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs condemned gratuitous use of violence in movies and said he would avoid making those types of films in future. Though that won’t stop his company from releasing a new Tarantino flick this December, in The Hateful Eight, which is sure to have its fair share of gun battles; nor does it account for the lack of gun massacre movies pre-2014.

Whether Weinstein keeps his word or whether others follow suit is beside the point. In the interest of self-preservation, the lack of a true-life gun massacre film genre is a net positive. No matter where you fall on the political spectrum, no one wants to witness a fictionalised version of college students or kindergarteners getting brazenly gunned down by a madman. Why spend money on that when you can turn on the local news?





posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:50 AM
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They are too afraid, and rightly so, of being held responsible if they do a movie and somebody does a copycat attack.

Not surprising they don't want to touch it with a bargepole.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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A 2013 study found that in the last 30 years, gun violence has tripled in PG-13 movies, with 94% of the most popular projects containing at least one violent scene.


Well, that's a bull snip study.

Gun violence?

A political neologism created to FEAR MONGER.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Painterz
They are too afraid, and rightly so, of being held responsible if they do a movie and somebody does a copycat attack.

Not surprising they don't want to touch it with a bargepole.



What about the polluting our culture’s psychology with massive violence in movies



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:55 AM
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originally posted by: Willtell
source
Today I had an inspiration and wondered is it a fact that Hollywood rarely makes movies about mass shootings.

And lo and behold this feeling I had seems to be true.




If there is one thing American entertainment does well, it’s bloodshed. Yet few films dare to tackle our gun epidemic – perhaps because there’s no catharsis to be had and no end in sight
In America, our idealism is matched only by our bloodlust. We are a nation hopelessly and endlessly addicted to violence, and as such look for the same in our television shows, our books, and, of course, our movies. That’s why our multiplexes are filled each year with a cavalcade of big-budget shooter flicks and apocalyptic action fare, both real and fictionalised. We (myself included) crowd into theaters and cheer on the pornographic gore of Mad Max: Fury Road and Lone Survivor, the bloodless brutality of Avengers: Age of Ultron, the quasi first-person shooter fantasy of John Wick.


Yet despite that brutality, there has been curiously little space in film devoted to real-life mass shootings. Save for a handful of small indie flicks – the most notable examples being Gus Van Sant’s Elephant and Lynne Ramsay’s We Need to Talk About Kevin – gun-wielding American-bred slaughters are basically non-existent on screen. This is strange, considering how much money Hollywood contributes toward depicting violence.



Indeed for some reason real life gritty movies about mass shootings rarely get Hollywood's attention.

Umm....
Perhaps they are afraid to be labeled a part of the problem.




A 2013 study found that in the last 30 years, gun violence has tripled in PG-13 movies, with 94% of the most popular projects containing at least one violent scene. And while tragedies like 9/11 receive the big screen treatment (Oliver Stone’s World Trade Center, United 93) – getting mined for every bloody detail, wrung from it every last drip of emotional juice – none of that cash is being devoted to portraying our society’s gun epidemic.

Has the Harvey Weinstein influence taken effect? Some background: in 2014, the studio head behind such fare as Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs condemned gratuitous use of violence in movies and said he would avoid making those types of films in future. Though that won’t stop his company from releasing a new Tarantino flick this December, in The Hateful Eight, which is sure to have its fair share of gun battles; nor does it account for the lack of gun massacre movies pre-2014.

Whether Weinstein keeps his word or whether others follow suit is beside the point. In the interest of self-preservation, the lack of a true-life gun massacre film genre is a net positive. No matter where you fall on the political spectrum, no one wants to witness a fictionalised version of college students or kindergarteners getting brazenly gunned down by a madman. Why spend money on that when you can turn on the local news?



In one of the Jason Bourne movies (the one without Matt Damon), there was a mass shooting scene. They made a chemist go crazy and shoot up his work place to cover up some wrong doing.

Also, one of the COD games had mass shooting scene where the player who was infiltrating a terrorist cell had to go through with shooting up an airport full of civilians.

In most movies, the hero is shooting anonymous bad guys. They have no names. No families. No real lines in the movies. Just endless targets much like Storm Troopers.

I think the combination of movies, videos games, broken families, psychopathic drugs and a 24 hour news cycle is what is leading to these shootings.

These types of shootings have been happening since the 60s... first I can remember is the UT Austin Bell Tower shootings. Then there were a slew of postal workers flipping out (hence the going postal meme). A McDonald's shooting. Luby's in Texas. Colin Ferguson on Long Island railway. A lot of these shootings though seemed to be either 1) domestic violence 2) fired employee.

It was really until Columbine and VTech that the nerds/goths/weirdo types decided to start shooting up schools. Then it seems like every jilted loser decides shooting up a school is the best way to get revenge.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: Willtell


Real-life mass shootings: the subject Hollywood dare not touch

Hah, yes they do touch that 'subject'. That approach is completely different though.. Mass shooters like in the film American Sniper and any comic book superhero movie you care to name. How many 'enemies' do they dust in their films?

What do we really expect young people to think about mass murder as they grow up in a intentionally glamorized, warmongering society?



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated

My interest is going after the sacred cows that are to some degree responsible along WITH US.

When we go to these violent movies, we contribute. Though I don’t want to ever sound self-righteous.

Hollywood, the arms industry, the pharmaceutical industry, the politicians, and we the people

We need to start naming names…. It’s not just the gun industry



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:06 PM
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Hollywood doesn't like school shooting movies because there's no hero, and no happy ending. Nobody is saved. Nobody comes to the rescue. Not that there aren't movies like that, but they make little if any money. Hollywood likes to make movies where our virtues are confirmed, not where we fail.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Hollywood is about make believe to a great extent…If they wanted to they can find a hero

I think it’s about self-preservation. The eye might get on them if a moviemaker makes the point they have a responsibility



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

Have you ever seen Rampage? by Uwe Boll?.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: testingtesting
a reply to: Willtell

Have you ever seen Rampage? by Uwe Boll?.


no



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

"We need to talk about Kevin" was a really well made movie about a school massacre....



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

Hard to watch he even made a 2nd one.
Not saying it is a good movie or not but worth a watch if you can find it.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

Just watching "Eggheads" in UK and there was a question regarding history

"what type of weapon was a matchlock" "rocket, gun or grenade"

Contestant (British)

deep breath "erm....that doesnt ring a bell, not sure, i have heard of flintlock so i will guess gun"

To me this is a microcosm of everything I believe is an inherent difference between the two countrys








edit on 15-2-2018 by UpIsNowDown because: typo



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

First season of American Horror Story from 2011. Evan Peters (now a pretty popular actor) plays an infamous school shooter.




Hollywood does tackle these topics, but it tends to glamorize them.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:14 PM
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originally posted by: Willtell
I think it’s about self-preservation. The eye might get on them if a moviemaker makes the point they have a responsibility

On the list of all the people responsible, they are way, way down on the list. All the way down past the shooter, their parents, teachers and counselors, bullies (if applicable), etc. I would say that even the NRA is above Hollywood on that list.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe
a reply to: Willtell

"We need to talk about Kevin" was a really well made movie about a school massacre....


Oh...there's also one called Elephant that is based on the Columbine shooting.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Vasa Croe
a reply to: Willtell

"We need to talk about Kevin" was a really well made movie about a school massacre....


Oh...there's also one called Elephant that is based on the Columbine shooting.


Sure is an elephant that happened at the height of the Clinton weapons ban.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 12:22 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Willtell
I think it’s about self-preservation. The eye might get on them if a moviemaker makes the point they have a responsibility

On the list of all the people responsible, they are way, way down on the list. All the way down past the shooter, their parents, teachers and counselors, bullies (if applicable), etc. I would say that even the NRA is above Hollywood on that list.


Maybe



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 01:26 PM
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Don't watch the movies then. Freedom and all that.

It will never cease to amaze me how after every single mass shooting we hear the same folks blaming video games, movies, and music.

It's never the gun, and never the individual. It's Call of Duty and John Wick.

Also - if guns don't kill people, why do we arm our troops? If the threat of knives, machetes, and spoons should be seen as equally dangerous in the hands of one who wants to commit malice - why not arm our troops with these same weapons?



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