It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Coq' Au Vin...for dinner!!!

page: 1
9
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 06:49 PM
link   
Have wonderful Coq Au Vin in the oven now for dinner!

It's a foot race to get the chicken, onions, spices and things ready for the wine, but when the wine goes in you get a rest for a couple hours.

Coq Au Vin is such a nice dish, especially with the glazed shallots and mushrooms and burre' manie.

Oh...I'm excited!! It's been a while since I've made this, and the wife (the Chef) loves it! Hopefully I'll do justice to it...I am doing it in the Le Creuset DO, so that's automatic points right there!

(smells good!!)



----(loves to cook!!)




posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 06:55 PM
link   
Works good with bourbon, too.
We's eatin' like rich folk tonight.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 06:55 PM
link   
Works good with bourbon, too.
We's eatin' like rich folk tonight.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 07:10 PM
link   
Don't much care for foods like that made with wine. Not a wine person. I do put a splash of wines in my soups, but only about a tablespoon. Aged products like that give me a headache, I can't produce enough aldehyde enzymes to get rid of the side effects.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 07:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I lov coq au vin. I usually use cabernet as the wine and then use xanthan gum instead of a roux to thicken the sauce.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 07:36 PM
link   
I am eating ramen noodles tonight.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 08:34 PM
link   
In a cooked dish like coq au vin, all the alcohol has evaporated away by the time the dish is served, so acetaldehyde metabolism shouldn't be a factor, if that's what you're concerned about.

On the other hand, coq au vin does use red wine, so if you're sensitive to the tannins in red wine, that could be an issue.

Personally, as I've gotten older, I can no longer tolerate big red wines anymore because the tannins give me a headache, even though white wines don't. I have no problem with coq au vin, however.

a reply to: rickymouse



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 09:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Have wonderful Coq Au Vin in the oven now for dinner!

It's a foot race to get the chicken, onions, spices and things ready for the wine, but when the wine goes in you get a rest for a couple hours.

Coq Au Vin is such a nice dish, especially with the glazed shallots and mushrooms and burre' manie.

Oh...I'm excited!! It's been a while since I've made this, and the wife (the Chef) loves it! Hopefully I'll do justice to it...I am doing it in the Le Creuset DO, so that's automatic points right there!

(smells good!!)



----(loves to cook!!)


Been a food n travel writer. Pictures, or it didn’t happen. Don’t tell me how good it is, show the process n plating, or it didn’t happen. Just saying. A picture is worth a thousand words.

Denny



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 09:44 PM
link   
a reply to: DaCook

You know, you're right. I always take pictures. However, I also eat the dish first and see if it's worthy.

I've made Coq Au Vin about (3) times in my life and every single time I was disappointed. Tonight was no different. I even used a $450 LeCreuset Dutch Oven (which my wife bought me as a gift)...AND a LeCreuset recipe!!

I did the chicken. I did the glazed shallots and mushrooms...and I did the Buerre Manie. All were done perfectly and to the time and recipe. ...

It still tasted like chicken soup with wine in it, and some mushrooms and corn starch! I'm sorry, but I'm a food critic.

I just didn't like this. I mean it was good (most would probably love it), but I thought it was just average. The mushrooms and shallots were really nice, but I thought the chicken was over done (on a 2.5 hour simmer at 275). I used a nice pinot noir dry red wine (full bottle) and the chicken still didn't really take it up enough (in my opinion).

You know, sometimes you win, and sometimes not so much. I'm going with "not so much" for this one.

Sorry, no pictures. It wasn't really that sexy.

Jumbalaya looks about the same...and some sausage in this probably would have rocked!!

(sigh)

Hey, sometimes things don't come out as good as you'd expect.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 10:08 PM
link   
Well bon apetit
I've never made the dish myself.We eat a lot of chicken but hubby won't like coq au vin.I use cabernet to stew lamb shanks,thats about as adventurous as he is willing to be.

ETA Oh sorry i see you were not impressed with it,sorry to hear.
edit on 11-2-2018 by Raxoxane because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 10:17 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Maybe try it with white wine sometime? Coq au Vin Blanc. The recipe is quicker, lighter tasting, a bit more forgiving. I really enjoy it much more than Coq au Vin, which can taste like the 11th century and the only trustworthy liquid was alcohol.
edit on 11-2-2018 by Atsbhct because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 10:41 PM
link   
I even flamed off the chicken with brandy (cool fire show, but...), but I just wasn't that impressed.

Sad. It was a lot of work, and some hustle...all seemingly for not.

Don't get me wrong, it wasn't horrible, but it wasn't spectacular either (not in my mind anyway). I had hoped for more, it I've had BBQ'd chicken, or Jamaican jerked chicken which was better.


edit on 2/11/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 10:42 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk


Really do not like to reply or post in this website as it is not user friendly or I'm not smart enough nor have the desire to learn.


With that said............. Dinner Tonight.



Sous Vide Pork Loin for 11 hours at 125 degrees, Blacked Buter seared on my blackstone grill @ 550 degrees. Cost me 70 cents for the Pork asit cost me $4.85.

Denny



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 01:18 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk



Jamaican jerked chicken

Now you're talkin....



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 03:08 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk




You know, you're right. I always take pictures.


Have you ever posted one? Of anything?



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 03:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

A lot of restaurants fall down on this dish too, in my experience. It's delicious when it's right and a sad waste of time, energy and money when it tanks.


I'm cooking a daube de boeuf for 8 in March and think you'll like the recipe. It's got the same homely, comfort-food vibe as the Coq' Au Vin which is why I think you'll dig it.

It's not expensive and preparation is about half an hour. Instead of the crockpot, I'll use a cast iron casserole pot and passata over canned tomatoes. It's also tempting to add some celery and beef stock for more flavour so I'll put some aside and be ready to add to taste during the (long!) cooking process. The beauty of these dishes is variety. You can add carrots or potatoes towards the end which makes it more filling and doesn't change the flavour. Crusty buttered bread is a given.


Here are some pics to show the variety...




posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 05:51 AM
link   
a reply to: Domo1

Fair question.

Yes, I have, but pretty infrequently. There are some examples of the few times I have right here on this (food) forum. However, ATS isn't really very picture friendly (at all) in my opinion, and posting pictures involves several steps beyond the normal few any website requires. Every time I go to post pics I have to figure out the peculiarities to do it here all over again and it's just not worth the hassle. A couple of the required steps to post pics here are almost intentionally difficult which makes me wonder if there isn't actually a bias discouraging pics rather than encouraging them. (storage space maybe?). It's kind of a shame too as I have tons of them, and have regularly posted them on one other website I belong to.

So no, you're right, I don't post a lot of pics here on ATS. (for the aforementioned reasons)



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 06:27 AM
link   
a reply to: Kandinsky

I'll look into that.

I think you hit the nail on the head when you said it's a "...sad waste of time, energy and money when it tanks."

Honestly, if I would have paid an up-charge at a nice restaurant for the fancy French name...I would have sent this dish back (and that's really, really, rare for me!!).

I think the most aggravating thing for me was the irony of my criticism of the dish in general. In the end I felt it was overdone, and yet at every step along the way I understated the level of done-ness to prevent just exactly this...being overdone! I can cook, and I mean really cook, so to have something crash like that is a pretty big disappointment.

The other ironic thing was the recipe I used. I had narrowed it down to two different versions. One of them was from the TV host Alton Brown, and the other was off of Le Creuset's website. In the end I opted for the Le Creuset version thinking it would be much closer to the original. I was wrong. And you'd think a French website which sells the most expensive French cast iron on planet Earth (the very heart and soul of the Coq Au Vin dish) would have a 'knock your socks off' version of the famous recipe! (I should have stuck with one of the recipes in one of the wife's numerous French cookbooks).

Live and learn I guess.



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 06:27 AM
link   
DP
edit on 2/12/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 06:44 AM
link   
a reply to: DaCook

I'm not a big fan of the Sous Vide method. It actually worries scares me, quite frankly! Eleven hours at 125 degrees is just begging for a case of food poisoning unless it's prepared in practically a clean-room environment.

I've had the "40-140" rule beaten into my skull for so long it's hard for me to go elsewhere intentionally...especially for that long. I will only deviate from that with beef (regularly) and sometimes pork, but then it's only for very short cooking times when the food is going to be consumed pretty quickly after being removed from a sub-40 environment. Sure, I do some cooking methods (smoking for example) where the cook time is far longer (8-10 hours, sometimes longer), but the cook environment is always above 140 and more like 225, so at least no pathogens are coming from the outside only the inside if there are any at all.

Not slamming the method, I'm sure it's fine (goodness knows it's pretty popular these days), but I haven't gotten on-board with it yet.

edit...for example, I'll take a rare steak at 120-125 degrees, but it's been cooked at 950-1,000+ degrees F (which is about the normal temps I use for grilling). And for longer, slower, things like smoking I always try to observe the "2 hour" rule where nothing ever sits in the danger zone for more than 2 hours throughout it's whole process.

edit II...Sorry, I'm off-topic...on my own dang thread! LOL!

edit on 2/12/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
9
<<   2 >>

log in

join