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Warning of 'ecological Armageddon' after dramatic plunge in insect numbers

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posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:47 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I'm listening to the video right now. It's funny because a few weeks ago I was talking about how we don't see butterflies anymore around here. Bumble bees are rare, honey bees, dragon flies, etc.. What we do see a ton of are the bugs that were introduced to our area purposefully. We see those in mass quantities.

I wonder how much those introduced "non invasive" insects have on the natural species in the area? I know that introducing new species has been happening since Roman times, but, I don't think they did it in such huge quantities. Natural migrating occurs, but nature has a way of gradually introducing the species. We just dump a few thousand in an area and hope for the best it seems.

I'm not saying that this is the only cause, but I wonder how much it actually harms the ecosystem. Non invasive to us might be devastating to the natural species of the region, we just don't know what would upset the delicate balance of the ecosystem.


The introduction of species beyond their native range as a direct or indirect result of human action (termed non-native species here) causes changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. In some cases, these changes are dramatic and may result in the extinction of native species or radical changes in ecosystem functioning, but for the vast majority of non-native species no quantitative information is available on the consequences of such introductions (Kulhanek et al. 2011; Larson et al. 2013; Simberloff et al. 2013). We do know that the impacts of non-native species generally increase if the species establish themselves and spread in their new environment (i.e., if they become invasive sensu Blackburn et al. [2011]), but non-native species can have impacts even when they are not established or widespread (Ricciardi & Cohen 2007; Jeschke et al. 2013; Ricciardi et al. 2013). Indeed, non-native species can have impacts as soon as they are introduced; for example, pathogens can affect the health of animals, plants, or other organisms immediately after their arrival in the new environment. The breadth and potential severity of the impacts of non-native species means that a better understanding of them is of broad relevance, for example, for prioritizing management, conservation and restoration actions, and for appropriate policy responses to invasions. ...


Thanks for posting this,

blend




posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:49 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Sure it has already been said...

Ah hell, I don’t think that they care what I think anyway.

Stay thirsty, my friend!
edit on 10-2-2018 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: sdl



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 04:17 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I wonder if the ecological plunge in insect numbers is worse than ATS's plunge in decent content over the past 13 years since I left this place? Oh well. Only time will tell. Bees are disappearing in record number throughout the world. Human beings are next.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 04:22 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Worth bringing up again I suppose but you're a bit late with the news as I started a thread on it back on oct 19th 2017.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky


This is what scares me.
www.cnn.com...

Its not nice to fool with mother nature.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 06:40 AM
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I my opinion they are likely mismanaging the nature preserves. If they were properly managing those areas there shouldn't be a problem.

We as a species have a tendency to believe we have all the answers concerning nature, but it's a complex system where the smallest details are important. Maybe they need a wild fire every once and awhile, or there are some other missing species they haven't given consideration too. Lots of things come into play that they may not even know about.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 06:40 AM
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A climax ecosystem has far less diversity than one that gets altered by things like fire or wind storms and the like. They may have an ecosystem that is balanced for the conditions they created but are expecting more than the system can sustain.
edit on 10-2-2018 by MichiganSwampBuck because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 07:10 AM
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If they are maesurimg by weight have they accounted for size differences? Environment drives size and insects are on the front line for evolutionary changes.

Not to mention the bugs selected for inclusion vs just using total biomass, gives an appearance of cherry picking.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 07:18 AM
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I've seriously noticed this where i live in the Scottish HIghlands. Used to be insects everywhere all the time except in winter.

Last summer? It was bizarre, barely a single insect anywhere. Was really weird walking on a summer day and seeing virtually nothing.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 11:12 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH
Don't insect populations rise and fall in cycles?

I think I read somewhere that all these small creatures have cycles in their population numbers.

Something to do with the interaction with predators.

Goes something like this:

Insects multiply quickly, causing their natural predators to find more food. So, the predator population also rises, until they become so numerous that they begin to eat all the insects. This causes the insects population to fall rapidly. This in turn causes the predators to starve and die off. Then, with the predators greatly diminished, the insects begin to multiply quickly once again.

The cycle repeats over and over.



That's population dynamics or partial-differential equations / reaction-diffusion equations. The reaction part is based on how fast species A and B breed as well as how much species A eat species B. Then the diffusion part is the probability that each will set up a colony elsewhere.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 11:27 AM
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the problem is the inter-nationalists in charge value profit and power over everything else.
there was that movie that said like 40 billion a year is all you need to clean up all the garbage on the planet.
the r0thschild wars spend that in a month.

its a shame, in the usa they are closing shop on our free internet.
with a free internet, we had a chance to dethrone these soci0paths.

i know so many of my friends who are die hard dem0crats/republikans.
one guy was like, well 0bama's wars are ok, Trunps wars are bad.

thats the newz programming people, and that is why they need the internet on lockdown.

im still baffled by the fact the bad guys in charge want the big gun. props if you know that movie reference.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 11:29 AM
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People think of insects as pests, but they play a critical part in our ecosystem. We are messing up badly, we are increasing our susceptibility to forest fires burning everything by our destroying bugs so much. Remember, bugs are high in nitrogen and birds eat them and poop in the woods, this feeds the trees and if a tree has lots of urea nitrogen it's leaves and needles do not burn so easily. Birds and bugs are a critical part of our ecology.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 01:35 PM
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Maybe you should look into the NWO, U.N. agenda 21 and 30, chem-trails, insecticides, fertilizers, past above ground nuclear detonations etc. I'll bet the answer is in there somewhere. a reply to: 727Sky



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: wakeupstupid
Whatever kills mosquitoes is good for the planet, in my honest opinion. The only good bug, is a dead bug. Want to know more?


I kill mosquitoes. you are welcome.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: pirhanna

I see no change in the insect population here in florida.

First thing I thought of when i read this thread was , If this is true then it would be a great time to open an insect breeding farm.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 10:47 PM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

originally posted by: FlukeSkywalker

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: 727Sky


The information is out there for those willing to listen, the whole world is changing, there is a massive breakdown going on, all manner of species are disappearing, our ecosystems are collapsing. Its not a pretty picture but not many people care as chasing money is far more important. Sad that we have so much potential as a species yet greed and short sighted behaviours rule......



Whatever takes care of eliminating the bugs...





Once the bugs go so does our ability to grow food, I hope you enjoy eating dirt because that's where we are headed.


Ahhh but perhaps evolution will find a way.

Bugs are reaponsible for a whole lot of death and basically all decay on the planet...perhaps they are disappearing because WE WANT THEM TOO.

Tormentors of all...these bugs.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 10:58 PM
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it's getting colder



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 12:30 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

originally posted by: FlukeSkywalker

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: 727Sky


The information is out there for those willing to listen, the whole world is changing, there is a massive breakdown going on, all manner of species are disappearing, our ecosystems are collapsing. Its not a pretty picture but not many people care as chasing money is far more important. Sad that we have so much potential as a species yet greed and short sighted behaviours rule......



Whatever takes care of eliminating the bugs...





Once the bugs go so does our ability to grow food, I hope you enjoy eating dirt because that's where we are headed.


No your wrong the most essential staple food crops on the planet, like corn, wheat, rice, soybeans and sorghum, need no insect help at all; they are wind-pollinated or self-pollinating.



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 12:45 AM
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originally posted by: ParasuvO

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

originally posted by: FlukeSkywalker

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: 727Sky


The information is out there for those willing to listen, the whole world is changing, there is a massive breakdown going on, all manner of species are disappearing, our ecosystems are collapsing. Its not a pretty picture but not many people care as chasing money is far more important. Sad that we have so much potential as a species yet greed and short sighted behaviours rule......



Whatever takes care of eliminating the bugs...





Once the bugs go so does our ability to grow food, I hope you enjoy eating dirt because that's where we are headed.


Ahhh but perhaps evolution will find a way.

Bugs are reaponsible for a whole lot of death and basically all decay on the planet...perhaps they are disappearing because WE WANT THEM TOO.

Tormentors of all...these bugs.


There disappearing because we spend lots of money for them to do so. We buy bug zappers we pay pest control to spray are homes. We spend money on things to repel them and people are surprised there is less bugs??
edit on 2/11/18 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2018 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

originally posted by: FlukeSkywalker

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: 727Sky


The information is out there for those willing to listen, the whole world is changing, there is a massive breakdown going on, all manner of species are disappearing, our ecosystems are collapsing. Its not a pretty picture but not many people care as chasing money is far more important. Sad that we have so much potential as a species yet greed and short sighted behaviours rule......



Whatever takes care of eliminating the bugs...





Once the bugs go so does our ability to grow food, I hope you enjoy eating dirt because that's where we are headed.


No your wrong the most essential staple food crops on the planet, like corn, wheat, rice, soybeans and sorghum, need no insect help at all; they are wind-pollinated or self-pollinating.






You have no idea what you are talking about, read up on micro organisms, the smallest of insects you cannot see they are the life force of the earth, without them nothing grows, nothing at all as the soil dies.

Ignorance like you just displayed will be our downfall.



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