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Fortified wood set to revolutionize multiple industries

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posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 11:55 PM
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Scientists at the University of Maryland have fortified wood using a process which makes it 12 times stronger, producing a natural substance more durable than many titanium alloys and capable of stopping high-speed projectiles.

“This could be a competitor to steel or even titanium alloys ... It’s also comparable to carbon fiber, but much less expensive,”

this revolutionary material may spark a green revolution for materials science and reshape the engineering world
Source


Scientists have discovered a way to "reinforce" wood, essentially by boiling it in a special solution and then pressing it, which causes it to be much thinner but with a significantly increased density. It's so strong that it's more durable than many titanium alloys... And it's bulletproof. Many industries, particulary construction and engineering, are set to be revolutionized by this drastically improved wood.
On top of that, this reinforced wood could solve many environmental problems around the world, as various fast-growing and environmentally-friendly kinds of trees can be used.




posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: trollz

That's what she said.

(the girl who wrote the article)



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 12:09 AM
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originally posted by: trollz

Scientists at the University of Maryland have fortified wood using a process which makes it 12 times stronger, producing a natural substance more durable than many titanium alloys and capable of stopping high-speed projectiles.

“This could be a competitor to steel or even titanium alloys ... It’s also comparable to carbon fiber, but much less expensive,”

this revolutionary material may spark a green revolution for materials science and reshape the engineering world
Source


Scientists have discovered a way to "reinforce" wood, essentially by boiling it in a special solution and then pressing it, which causes it to be much thinner but with a significantly increased density. It's so strong that it's more durable than many titanium alloys... And it's bulletproof. Many industries, particulary construction and engineering, are set to be revolutionized by this drastically improved wood.
On top of that, this reinforced wood could solve many environmental problems around the world, as various fast-growing and environmentally-friendly kinds of trees can be used.


How about using hemp. Strap yourselves in and prepare for lift off. What camo looks good on balsa wood armor?



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 12:22 AM
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I had Brazilian walnut hardwood installed a few years ago , the guy said it was the densest wood he’d ever worked on, his nails kept bending , not going in.

So wonder if this amazing wood is bulletproof, how are they able to shoot nails through in construction?



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 12:28 AM
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Looks like there’s another Thread on it



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 01:03 AM
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originally posted by: violet
I had Brazilian walnut hardwood installed a few years ago , the guy said it was the densest wood he’d ever worked on, his nails kept bending , not going in.

So wonder if this amazing wood is bulletproof, how are they able to shoot nails through in construction?





It's called drilling a pilot hole.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 02:08 AM
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originally posted by: violet
I had Brazilian walnut hardwood installed a few years ago , the guy said it was the densest wood he’d ever worked on, his nails kept bending , not going in.

So wonder if this amazing wood is bulletproof, how are they able to shoot nails through in construction?


Surprising to the laymen, bullet proof vests do not stop arrows.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 02:14 AM
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originally posted by: FlukeSkywalker
a reply to: trollz

That's what she said.

(the girl who wrote the article)


Only funny once..... first time was a fluke Luke !



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: wakeupstupid

originally posted by: violet
I had Brazilian walnut hardwood installed a few years ago , the guy said it was the densest wood he’d ever worked on, his nails kept bending , not going in.

So wonder if this amazing wood is bulletproof, how are they able to shoot nails through in construction?


Surprising to the laymen, bullet proof vests do not stop arrows.


Arrows neither go through hardened wood or body armor.. Kevlar yea.. but this is more comparing ceramic plates to wood. And the wood is stronger.

Wood has grain.. so you can imagine splitting it.
I dont know, it sounds interesting.
edit on 10-2-2018 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:27 AM
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I work in a steel mill, which will make me biased, but i can’t see anything replacing steel.

1. Steel is the most recycled material on earth

2. Trees take years to grow, and we’ve cut down enough trees already.

3. My rolling mill rolls 4000 ton of new structural steel everyday. You would not be able to make enough quickly enough for demand

4. Our melt shop has a 2 million ton capacity annually, using an electric arc furnace, it is a sight to see seeing arcing electricity at that capacity. Think of the voltage required to turn 300 tons of scrap metal to liquid in 10 minutes



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:34 AM
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a reply to: ADUB77

To be fair thats the point.

Think of the voltage.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:40 AM
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a reply to: skalla

Electricity from nuclear power is the cleanest form of power......

So i am confused as to the point you’re trying to make

Would you prefer coking coal furnaces polluting the air Ike what’s used in Hamilton and Pittsburgh

EAF furnaces are the only way to go....



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 03:49 AM
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a reply to: ADUB77

It aint cleaner than the power it takes to grow trees.

But obviously there are massive difference between the processes and time involved producing steel and any quantity of mature trees.

But again maybe there is a lesson there. Rampant production and consumption aint neccessarily the future.



posted on Feb, 10 2018 @ 05:43 AM
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Topic already being discussed here, thread closed.




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