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Jeff Sessions’ answer to opioid crisis: Americans should opt for aspirin, ‘tough it out’

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posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: DBCowboy

Not really that outside. The Dea has found lots of these situations. The pills are all traceable. Congress has voted several times to protect manufacturers.


Well there you go.

We should trust the people to solve the opioid crisis who are the people who facilitate the opioid crisis?


Now on that we agree.

Kelly Ann Conway has no idea how to solve the opioid crisis and Jeff sessions is still stuck on the glory days of refer madness.

What they should do is use the SG and research facilities to do surveys on what testaments are working and provide guidance to states who are utterly failing to make headway. Not threaten to jail people with mental health disorders or Marijuana users.

Let alone provide junk antecdotal person opinions
edit on 9-2-2018 by luthier because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: luthier

I'll go back to my original post and my original point.

Sessions is an idiot. And not the cool kind like me.

I mean a real "football helmet wearing just to go the bathroom" type of ree-ree.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: Xcalibur254

Translated to grass root English, There IS no law being violated. Congress isn't going to do anything to piss off Big Pharma by making new laws.

So deal with it!



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Xcalibur254




What the U.S. Surgeon General dubbed "The Opioid Crisis" likely began with over-prescription of powerful opioid pain relievers in the 1990s, which led to them becoming the most prescribed class of medications in the United States.


Opioid Crisis

Seriously, take an aspirin.


From your source: "Studies suggest that 75% of opioid abusers started their opioid use by taking drugs which had been obtained in a way other than by legitimate prescription, and only 8-12% of chronic opioid patients became addicted.[68]"



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 04:05 PM
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I hate Norco etc. But I'm also in danger (as will many others) due to then having no choice but taking 6 to 10 ibuprofen at a time every 4 to 6 hours to try to stop pain. Note I say "try". Barely touches my pains.
Destroys the liver and more.. But the pain is slightly gone.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 04:10 PM
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I'm a medically retired infantry combat veteran. I have had facial reconstruction, jaw, neck, knee, back and shoulder surgeries. Sometimes multiple surgeries on the same things. I took some pain killers after my back surgery, well 3 days after when I fell down some stairs. I still have the prescription. I went to the ER with a blown shoulder (again) and never took the meds. I went to the ER because I reinjured my neck and was literally paralyzed and couldn't get off the floor for hours.

I don't want painkillers, I'll take medical marijuana any day. I don't deserve to suffer.

Having said that, I go to the gym 5 days a week and can't feel my right hand or feet. I can't lift more than 50lbs or I won't be able to walk the next day. I have to be very careful playing with my kids.

Either way, I don't even take tylenol. I'll tell you what, if marijuana was legal, I would probably use it medicinally every day. I would have a better quality of life, and maybe start to think I lived in a free country like I did when I was a wee tot.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 04:46 PM
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Sessions was also goaded/strong armed into recusing himself from an investigation he had no conflict of interest in (especially by the Dem's standards for conflicts of interest).

I don't have much faith in him, and especially not his lack of understanding RE: chronic pain patients. Those on strong opoids are taking them because asprin and other OTC medicine is not working anymore. One is for moderate->severe pain, the other is for a headache

Worn out rhetoric like this does nothing to solve a national problem. My son in law went through opoid addition (pain medicine) but a good many of them are on far worse like heroin. This does nothing to solve that, although I'm not surprised since this (like every other "social" issue) cannot be solved through legislation or government intervention.

It starts with a return of morals and family values, and the return of the traditional family environment which of course isn't the whole solution



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: sarra1833
I hate Norco etc. But I'm also in danger (as will many others) due to then having no choice but taking 6 to 10 ibuprofen at a time every 4 to 6 hours to try to stop pain. Note I say "try". Barely touches my pains.
Destroys the liver and more.. But the pain is slightly gone.


Ibuprofen destroys the kidneys, not the liver.

800mg ibuprofen and 1000mg acetominophen, taken together, is an incredibly strong pain relief. In my experience, every bit as effective as hydrocodone.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:27 PM
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I double posted, oops
edit on 2/9/2018 by JBurns because: I double posted, oops



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

You are right Texan, but I believe the ceiling dose for Tylenol is ~4 grams (or 8 extra strength) while hydrocodone is functionally limited only by the dose a patient can handle before their breathing is compromised


I could be mistaken on those exact numbers though, I am a bit out of date


EDIT: You are right, hydrocodone formulations all have added Tylenol. I was misremembering, thinking of Oxycodone or hydromorphone one or the other. Been a few years since I volunteered with VFD, let my NREMT lapse

EDIT2: Per my wiki research it is hydromorphone I was remembering, since it is a full agonist without any added APAP or other nsaids
This is why nobody should get medical advice from the old guy on a conspiracy forum
(ME!)

edit on 2/9/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: Painterz

originally posted by: Ursushorribilis
a reply to: Painterz

Well I don't think he is arguing that people who need it shouldn't get it. He's saying don't go to the Dr. With chronic migraines and get prescribed hydrocodone.



If only America had something like a National Health Service that could issue country-wide guidelines on what medications should be prescribed for what complaints.


Spoken like an idiot.

No one with chronic migraine should ever be prescribed hydrocodone or any other opioid, but what I see regularly from chronic migraine sufferers in socialized care countries is that the standard migraine remedy *is* opioids. Migraine sufferers have trouble getting the specialized, individualized care we often need because spcialized countries have those very guidelines which dictate one-size-fits-all and if your "size" doesn't fit, then you're SOL or fighting uphill against a downhill stream of bureaucracy.

But at least you're not paying directly out of pocket for care that doesn't work for you.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:32 PM
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Folks are going to doctors to get painkillers for hangnails as they are already hooked.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

Hydromorphone, AKA "Dilaudid", is not something that people should take casually. Its typically given on the first day after surgery, or to cancer patients at the end of term.

Norco is, i believe, hydrocodone and ibuprofen. Lortab/lorcet/vicoden are acetomenophen combo's.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko


Well put ketsuko


It is the patients in the end of the day who are suffering from socialized/standardized medicine. Sure, the procedures and prescribing and what not need to have standards, standards of care, etc. But the approach of assuming everybody is the same (when we clearly are not, some worlds apart) is the real mistake



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:38 PM
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While it may not have been the intent, the Patients Rights bill of 2001 stipulates that we have a right:

To refuse third-party interference in their medical care, and to be confident that their actions in seeking or declining medical care will not result in third-party-imposed penalties for patients or physicians;

This, to me, sounds like the government (as a third party) needs to cease the heavy handed oversight of my physician.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:40 PM
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What's odd is that you can buy kickers down on 3rd street cheaper than Walgreens.



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


Agreed
Never had it myself, but gave it frequently (our protocols didn't include 5/10mg morphine, only 1-2mg dilaudid which i can never spell properly) or fentanyl if it was really bad (incomplete amputation was 1 example I always was told). But anyhow people's reaction to it was usually relatively remarkable, and seemed that it could be an addictive substance especially with frequent use

We used it in the IV route, so I am unsure if they would make dilaudid in tablet RX form but it would be really concerning if so. Just seems like a really high potential to abuse



Norco is, i believe, hydrocodone and ibuprofen.


Ah, that's right I appreciate the clarification, sounds as if over-prescribing of these could stem a lot of the abuse. I wonder if doctors are trained to use narcotics as first line treatments, or if alternative treatments (even physical therapy, which did wonders for my own back) are ever explored

It would be nice to see some safer and effective treatments for chronic pain suffers, because I know there are a lot of them



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: olaru12


Forgive my ignorance olaru, but what is a kicker?



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

Since getting the chronic migraine under control, I won't claim I've never had any opioids because I have had a couple surgeries, but I've waited to use the ones I was given until I could not stand the pain I was in.

I think I used one post C-section. One or two post neck surgery. I don't think I used any of the ones they prescribed me after I sprained the heck out of my ankle ... no, I did use one or two after I did it to sleep those first two nights because I couldn't get my ankle to stop throbbing and let me sleep.

But that was far, far less than the amount in my bottle. Who needs all that?!



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 05:47 PM
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Sessions would never experience the same kind of "health care" the rest of us do.
They have their own private doctors who I'm sure are happy to prescribe them opioids for a broken toe.
I once like Sessions but after his manic, ignorant comments on drugs and lack of action about corruption I wonder what the hell he's getting paid for.




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