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Machine Economy vs. Universal Basic Income

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posted on Feb, 4 2018 @ 07:43 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
Money can come from any production or service.

To be fair, the same can be said even with a UBI.


I think you're getting stuck in some of the illustrative concepts ideas I used. I obviously have no crystal ball and cannot predict where the economy will go in the future.

That is why I pointed out that you said that there would be no work to be done (production or service). We have to agree that there is something to allow people to earn credits or there isn't.


As far as who do you buy raw materials from? Its a decentralized economic model concept, you buy it from whoever has it for sale.

So it will be no different than today. Big corp processes the raw materials and then it goes through many hands, with an increase in price at each step, until you buy it from your outlet of choice.

We come back to the same question, is there something to do to earn credits? If not, then the credits will have to be handed out for doing nothing.




posted on Feb, 4 2018 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: daskakik




That is why I pointed out that you said that there would be no work to be done (production or service). We have to agree that there is something to allow people to earn credits or there isn't.


This is not to say that people would have nothing to buy or sell. When 98% of professions are automated, what is left? Human creativity and innovation won't stop because we automated the vast majority of tasks. There will still be people, far into the future, that will be master craftsmen, master artists, master musicians, and more. These areas of life take on meaning and utility in ways entirely too numerous to list in a post on ATS, and their economic impact on human history is nothing to scoff at.

In some form or another, there will always be economic demand for human creativity. You can only go so far with technology, and while I believe we can automate the market economy, I do not know what that transition period will look like.

I'm almost done with my paper, and you have given a whole lot to chew on as a result of our conversation. I still contend that the UBI, as a solution, would be disastrous for human freedom, and may even cause a world war.

I may be able to see down the road, but I don't know what's going to jump out in front of me. I have no idea what twists and turn humanity will take, or if we will even survive to see this concept come true, or simply die as my well-researched science fiction fantasy.



posted on Feb, 4 2018 @ 10:36 PM
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Only so much can be automated and the more we do the more dependent all of us will become on these damnable machines.
We actually have a choice in all this and that is either a mechanized dystopia or a simpler, less consumer-intensive society. I'm afraid most people have already bought in to the "all new tech is good tech" ideal and can't conceive giving any of their conveniences up. It is an inevitable problem for the developed world and no one is even thinking about how it will all fall out on the undeveloped places on Earth.

Very thought-provoking OP vxn

edit on 4-2-2018 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



 
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