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Why does it cost $32,093 just to give birth in America?

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posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
Why does it cost that much, For profit insurance companies that always want to improve their bottom line.

They drive the cost, compare the prices of procedures done under insurance to the prices at places that are cash only and you can see the difference its astonishing.

Oh and do they. When a single aspirin costs 30 goddamn dollars, we have a serious problem we need to address.




posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot

Oh, I know they do, but if the sticking point is how much you pay, then you are telling me you can still pay to have your fast, efficient care rather than wait.

So that's no different, is it?

I know that sometimes, what your systems define as "necessary" and what I might think of as necessary are two different things.

Sure if I blow my knee out, that might not be life threatening, but having to wait weeks to get the necessary tests to see how much damage is done also lets the knee heal in ways it shouldn't have to, and it will make the recovery and prognosis worse than it would if I could get in and out quickly to get those assessments and surgeries taken care of right away.

A difference between some systems and ours. But, yes, I can pay to have that speed and efficiency for my full recovery either way.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: avgguy

That's not 100% true. My other half needed to see a specialist and he was in right away and had his surgery right away. The wait time depends on a lot of different things, sometimes we wait, sometimes we don't. I would not trade Canada's health care system, unless we changed to something even better!



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

I love Canada.....you gave us hockey & it makes me smile.
Then you gave us Dion & Bieber and it makes me frown. Then I discovered Corb Lund & The Hurtin Albertins and it's all good again...........Corb Lund is awesome damn western singer, you all should be damn proud.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 08:06 AM
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Or you can self pay without insurance in the US. The hospital will calculate the bill based on your income and only charge 50% or less without padding the bill (with $30 aspirins laundry fees for the sheet on the cot) for procedures actually performed. In some cases, they base the bill on actual cost and will only charge a percentage on that.

If you qualify for Medicaid but never applied, those bills can actually retroactively be picked up by Medicaid after being performed like emergency heart bypasses, etc. So “free” and reasonable cost healthcare exists in the US. It has for years and years, which was never really addressed during the Obamacare fiasco.

But don’t let facts get in the way of which country rips off people more on healthcare arguments.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 08:18 AM
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Typically your insurance will have whats called an out of pocket maximum usually 3k to 5k but I have seen them as high as 15k.

Most insurance policies have a separate area for childbirth specifying what the cost will be to the parents



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: Southern Guardian


Why does it cost $32,093 just to give birth in America?"


First, that should be the U.S.A.

Second, because people keep pretending like the the industry most regulated and restricted by government interference and crony capitalism is "free market"... like this:


Well cause' the freemarket and the invisible hand God dang!


Healthcare is anything BUT the free market.

Finally, third, because "solutions" always empower (and enrich) the industry but never the people -- even to the extent of making people are afraid of their own bodies and don't even know how to take care of themselves.... and increasingly the law won't even let people take care of themselves.

edit on 31-1-2018 by Boadicea because: formatting



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: lordcomac

And the irony is that many women will have more and more children to maximize the other benefits they will receive, so we pay for that too. Not to mention if you are on government paid insurance, they will provide a translator,and transportation to and from your appointments. Of course there is no deductible or copay.

Meanwhile, my son who barely makes above minimum wage is charged 273.00 a month for minimal insurance with a 7000.00 deductible. Why bother to work if you are not in a good paying job, its easier to have the government foot the bill. They wonder why there are so many adults choosing not to work????



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:05 AM
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In my opinion (and only reading the OP), I would contribute this directly to the freemarket.

I have to say it....... If you are Democrat and think that overregulation of everything is going to solve all of our problems, you need to take a look at current events around the world and reevaluate your thinking process.

On the other hand, if you're a Republican/Libertarian that think deregulation and freemarkets are going to solve all of our problems, you need to take a look in a history book and reevaluate your thinking process.

Businesses, the bigger they are and more necessary they are, will screw people over as much as humanly possible to continue making profits. There's no argument, there's no debate, as there is no logical counterpoint I've ever heard other than "Regulation BAD derp". Likewise, there is no rational argument that regulation is good, as current laws and regulations have also helped the prices rise drastically, such as limiting competition among states, subsidizing, etc.

We all know (or some, anyway) that health insurance was a sort of pyramid scheme started back around the end of WW1 - Offering plans to perfectly healthy people so companies could reap nothing but profits. As the years went on, more and more people bought into these plans, where they basically paid for nothing. Eventually, as more and more medical advancements, vaccines, surgeries, were introduced , funded, life expectancy increasing, etc..... premiums had to keep going up so profits could keep rolling in. Then all the baby boomers cash in a health insurance they were paying for, premiums go up again.

Then, we have the Obamacare fiasco, mandating everyone carry insurance, leading to two things - 1, Emergency room visits skyrocket as the Obamacare coverage sucks (causing premiums to rise) and 2 - Now that everyone in the country MUST purchase your product, you can raise the prices to whatever you want.

All the while, we have people working in the medical field getting paid more and more as time goes on raising hospital care prices, plus the need for granite floors, marble walls, chandeliers and other "pretty looking things" that the people indirectly pay for through the rising cost of care.

Healthcare sucks. Insurance is even worse than suck. Unfortunately as we've seen, universal healthcare sucks too, and the single payer system quite possibly sucks the most.

We're pretty much screwed no matter what we do.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: Southern Guardian

Now imagine what it costs to give birth to a medically fragile child, induced, at a major hospital...

Oh, and the birth is all on you because, back then, you and your husband weren’t planning on having anymore kids so you weren’t carrying the very expensive “maternity rider.”

Fun times.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

But people in Denmark genuinely enjoy their way of life. It's truly one of the happiest places on Earth.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Sometimes we wait a little longer for non essential medical care, this us true. On average, we still live longer than US citizens.

"If we can wait for an MRI, we can wait to die." - Everyone in Canada.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: Teikiatsu
My son was born in 2010. C-section. I had insurance. I got a bill for $760.

So, this article is saying the usual: Insurance covers up a lot of waste and corruption. We need to get away from insurance for medical scenarios that happen literally every day in every part of the country and let the free market actually work.



In 2010, may as well been born in in 1980. Insurance has changed bigly since your outdated experience. And it hasn't gotten "better".

And we don't have a free market, it is a monopoly.

If the US's health care system was a cell phone provider we would have switched companies a long long time ago. But we can't.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 09:38 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Bluntone22

But people in Denmark genuinely enjoy their way of life. It's truly one of the happiest places on Earth.



You hate America



/sarc



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 10:06 AM
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My boss flew out of the country for two surgeries and saved over ninety thousand dollars. That's including airfare, and she's on a badass vacation while rehabilitating.

I really don't care if beer is expensive, I'm a responsible adult, and my health comes before my relaxation. Who am I kidding, I don't drink, I don't give a damn if you have to pay $40 for a case! Get over it, healthcare for hundreds of millions is vastly and endlessly more important than your horse piss.

Americans. Using the price of beer to debate the costs of healthcare.

Priorities.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: ScepticScot

Oh, I know they do, but if the sticking point is how much you pay, then you are telling me you can still pay to have your fast, efficient care rather than wait.

So that's no different, is it?

I know that sometimes, what your systems define as "necessary" and what I might think of as necessary are two different things.

Sure if I blow my knee out, that might not be life threatening, but having to wait weeks to get the necessary tests to see how much damage is done also lets the knee heal in ways it shouldn't have to, and it will make the recovery and prognosis worse than it would if I could get in and out quickly to get those assessments and surgeries taken care of right away.

A difference between some systems and ours. But, yes, I can pay to have that speed and efficiency for my full recovery either way.


The difference is that with universal healthcare people will still get the care even if they can't afford it. Maybe not the fastest or in the newest hospitals but they will still get it.

If you do pay for private care the service is fast, high quality and far cheaper than in the US as it has to be able to compete with the free care.

My annual contribution to my work health insurance is less than most Americans pay in a month.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 10:29 AM
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originally posted by: Southern Guardian
Well cause' the freemarket and the invisible hand God dang!


Stella Apo Osae-Twum and her husband did everything by the book. They went to a hospital covered by insurance, saw an obstetrician in their plan, but when her three sons – triplets – were born prematurely, bills started rolling in.

The hospital charged her family $877,000 in total.


Further down,


It’s nearly impossible to put a price tag on giving birth in America, since costs vary dramatically by state and hospital. But one 2013 study by the the advocacy group Childbirth Connection found that, on average, hospitals charged $32,093 for an uncomplicated vaginal birth and newborn care, and $51,125 for a standard caesarean section and newborn care. Insurance typically covers a large chunk of those costs, but families are still often on the hook for thousands of dollars.

www.theguardian.com...

Golly that's costly even with coverage? I mean you pay an arm and a leg already for ever increasing Healthcare premiums year by year? Why oh why are Americans paying so much more than the rest of the world? How about those runaway Healthcare premiums huh?



You'd figured having the highest expenditure of healthcare in the developed world this should be all covered right? I guess not. Since 1960 healthcare costs have risen by 12,300% and yet you still end up less out of your pocket even with coverage.

What? We've cut a tonne of regulations under the Reagan, the Bushes and now Trump. What is this all amounting to? How many times are we going to use the excuse that regulation or government is holding the markets back? When the trend clearly indicates the markets are getting freer reign year by year? Astounding.

Still a no to universal healthcare? Right? Right.


Do you have any idea how much malpractice insurance costs for doctors because they are the first to be blamed and sued f your little snowflake isn't born perfect? All the nurses, staff, and other doctors that are around to insure that a birth goes smoothly as possible, not too mention if something happens to ago awry?

My daughter was born two months premature last year. Not only that, my wife's water broke three weeks prior to her actual birth. I think the total cost of everything... wife was in hospital nearly a month. My daughter was in the NICU for almost a month total. It was around $300,000. Insurance picked up pretty much all of it.

I'm grateful for the doctors, nurses, and everyone who oversaw my daughter's birth and now she is a perfectly healthy after a bit of a rough start.

Top notch care cost a lot of money.

Insurance needs to go back to be INSURANCE. Not healthcare maintenance plans. You carry insurance for unexpected events, not for sniffles and stubbed toes. This is why insurance is so costly because people expect it to pay for everything instead of just major emergencies.

Imagine how much your homeowner's insurance woudl cost if it had to pay for lawn care and every little thing that goes wrong on a house. Refrigerator stops working, have insurance replace it. TV doesn't work, have insurance replace it.

Or your car.... need a tire rotation, car insurance pays for it. Need an oil change, car insurance pays for it.

This is the equilvalent of what is happening with health insurance. Instead of people paying out of pocket for things like physicals, flu shots, coughs, and other minor ailments, insurance is picking up the costs. This also causes price inflation since the ultimate end user (the patient) is completely disconnected from the cost and has no incentive to shop around service providers.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 10:51 AM
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The problem is the insurance companies, they make contracts with hospitals for procedure billing amounts. Then the hospital and insurance company agree upon a actual cost/fee for the procedure. The cost is usually about 10% of the actual billed amount. Insurance companies then tell the hospitals they have to show the "full" amount on the bill. The rub is, if your self pay the hospital is not going to change the billed amount to the actual cost like they do for the insurance companies. Nope, instead they want you to pay the inflated amount that was set by the insurance company. Which forces you to either pay, or go bankrupt. Either way insurance wins, because now as a non insured person you are desperately seeking insurance not wanting to be in that financial position ever again. Ask yourself, who's names are on the majority of high rises in your cities? Banks, and insurance companies. Why do you suppose that is?



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: Edumakated

Do you have a source for the malpractice insurance costs that Dr's pay? And is this a driving force in health care costs soaring?

I would think that the E-rooms (still) being used as general practitioners for the uninsured or insured poor who can't afford copays-out of pockets-out of networks-pharma bills i s a much bigger push for costs going up.

Pharma costs are also a HUGE cause of upward pressure on health care insurance.

And of course the monopolistic tendency of our medical system is a reason for the costs the US citizen pays. The US pays better than 2X the costs as the next nearest industrialized country with little to show in better health outcomes or quality.



posted on Jan, 31 2018 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: Southern Guardian

Shuuuuu, that is cheap, try giving birth to a gallbladder and see how much that sets you back.



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