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Lunar eclipse Jan 31 2018. - off schedule, storms, etc

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posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Ahem. It hasn't visited North Idaho? Were you here when August used to be pretty, not a dreary month of forest fire smoke?




posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 12:17 AM
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originally posted by: Look2theSacredHeart
a reply to: madmac5150

Ahem. It hasn't visited North Idaho? Were you here when August used to be pretty, not a dreary month of forest fire smoke?


Yup. The summer before last. Very mild summer... a lot of rain. Eastern Washington Rieslings from 2016 are quite nice, because of the wet summer. My wife and I shared a bottle earlier this evening. No smokey aftertaste...

2012 was a very mild summer here; 2013-2014 were quite nice, as well. We have only had bad smoke here during the summers of 2015 and 2017... most of that smoke drifted over from fires in Washington state.

N. Idahoans were remarkably relaxed... excessive inhalation.

Last winter was brutal. We had 4 feet of snow on the ground by late January. My yard looked like a WWI battlefield, with individual snow trenches dug between the house, and the animal pens... and it was COLD. We had both our phone lines and mail box wiped out by the snow plows.

This year has been just as bad, but for different reasons. It has been warmer, but every snow event has been a heavy, wet snow. The county snow plows have killed our phone lines twice, so far this year. It happened again nearly a week ago... they hope to have that fixed "sometime in the next 72 hours".

We have 10' tall snow berms that line our driveway. We pay folks to plow our driveway. The berms are AWESOME... if you lose traction on the ice; they bounce your vehicle right back into play.

My wife's 4X4 Jeep Grand Cherokee has more cuts and scrapes than your average episode of "Jackass", because of "global warming". My car...my Impala, is buried under at least 18" of "global warming" as we speak.

Al can kiss my N. Idaho potatoes.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: apdjbs1

If your a flat Earther it might you are on a globe the times zones are not perfect straight lines from north to south your wrong all the protesting won't make you right.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 07:44 AM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
Here's to looking up January 31st.




How are those weather forecasts coming?
www.wunderground.com...
Please post them before tonight. Thanks!



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: wmd_2008

Listen WMD, if "you're" going to play tough guy on the internet at least get your facts straight.
Time zones matter because you need to know how many hours you need to subtract in relation to source. I asked someone else a question and they answered it. You seem to be lonely and need someone to laugh at to get your Schadenfreude "fix" so you lurk these forums for easy targets.

Surely you are procrastinating from doing something else more productive.

Regardless of your reasoning one thing is clear, you aren't adding anything constructive to this conversation. You are simply distracting from the facts given. Some whom are more skeptical than myself may even consider that you are one of the paid distractors.

To steer you back on topic, here are the latest facts:

The luminosity of the full moon over Atlanta at the time I saw it:

Lunar Phase
Phase (percent full) 99.93%

And that's at sea level. I'm 1000' above sea level like millions of others around Atlanta.
"at 1,050 feet (320 m) above mean sea level, Atlanta has one of the highest elevations among major cities east of the Mississippi River. "

I saw the eclipse and we all can see the world says that was impossible. Yet the numbers seem to indicate it was possible. We can all remember the hurricanes that followed. It seemed like this was a good forum to post the question for others to check the upcoming eclipse (and full moon) times as well as pay attention to any remarkable upcoming weather in February.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 08:58 AM
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originally posted by: Saint Exupery

originally posted by: apdjbs1
Here's to looking up January 31st.




How are those weather forecasts coming?
www.wunderground.com...
Please post them before tonight. Thanks!


Perfectly clear and unremarkable for here. Everyone has to check their own. I'm not spoon feeding nor trying to make friends nor establish myself as a prophet.

There will be plenty of "you just got lucky" later. Someone has already set the groundwork with "weather changes every 5 minutes", thereby pre-establishing a comfortably thicker cognitive dissonance bubble to bounce off anything not already comfortable. But that won't keep them from checking the weather forecast when it comes to anything else.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

The solar eclipse this past summer.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: apdjbs1

If your a flat Earther it might you are on a globe the times zones are not perfect straight lines from north to south your wrong all the protesting won't make you right.


OOOPH...


*you're (you are) unless apbjbs1 owns an "a flat Earther" and a "wrong" and you're referring to his "a flat Earther, and his wrong," and if so then I apologize.

But I can make out "flat Earther." What else are you saying here and what's a flat Earther?



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Saint Exupery

The solar eclipse this past summer.


I'm sorry, I don't understand what your post is referring to. Could you please clarify the context? Thanks.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
To steer you back on topic, here are the latest facts:

The luminosity of the full moon over Atlanta at the time I saw it:

Lunar Phase
Phase (percent full) 99.93%

And that's at sea level. I'm 1000' above sea level like millions of others around Atlanta.

Irrelevant. The phase is still the same regardless. You could have realized that if you bothered to download my spreadsheet and plug in the numbers for yourself. But instead you've wasted everyone else's time with another pointless post. No, you did not see an eclipse that night. You saw clouds and maybe at some point you spied the moon with clouds partially covering it. There are thousands of amateurs looking at the moon every night from all around the country. If the eclipse timing were off, they would have reported it.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
a reply to: RTLSLZ1
Time zones matter. Do I really need to start an assembly to get that point across? Just kidding,


Salvador vs Atlanta moon rise times:
Salvador
www.timeanddate.com...
5:29 pm ↑ (106°)

Atlanta
www.timeanddate.com...
8:35 pm ↑ (108°)


Your source at moonrise:
Salvador
Azimuth (degrees, 0 North) 105.59
Phase (percent full) 99.99%

Atlanta?
Why no Atlant moonrise phase data?

I gave it to you. Why did I even bother wasting my time if you're not even going to look at what I'm giving you?


Year 2017
month 8
day 8
hour (UT) 0
minute 35
second 0
W Longitude (Decimal deg) 84.388
Latitude (Decimal deg) (N+, S-) 33.749
Height above sea level (meters) 0
Pressure (mb) 1013.25
Temperature (Centigrade) 25

Lunar Coordinates
Apparent Right Ascension at Equinox of date
Hours 21
Minutes 27
Seconds 16.09

Apparent Declination at Equinox of date
Degrees -15
Minutes -15
Seconds -6.02

Altitude (degrees) -0.16
Azimuth (degrees, 0 North) 107.76

Lunar Phase
Phase (percent full) 99.93%



Perhaps it doesn't need to be 100%.

It's basic geometry. The moon and sun were 176 degrees apart at that time. No, you can't get an umbral lunar eclipse with that angular separation. Earth's umbral shadow has a diameter of about 9300 km at the distance of the moon, which equates to an angular diameter of only 1.4 degrees. So no, an eclipse is not possible at that time.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
Here is something else to consider:
(Scroll down on the linked web pages for Salvador vs Atlanta moon rise times)
www.timeanddate.com...
5:29 pm ↑ (106°)

www.timeanddate.com...
8:35 pm ↑ (108°)

How can the moon rise 3hrs earlier for Salvador Brazil if they are only 1 hour difference from Atlanta (Eastern Daylight Time)?




You're partly right. The Moon rose 4 hours earlier in Salvador Brazil than in Atlanta that night, not 3. My mistake.

Salvador is very far east of Atlanta, so the Moon does rise quite a bit earlier than in Atlanta:

Link to full size image
As we can see, and as you mentioned, moonrise in Salvador was at 17:29 local Salvador time, which is UTC-3, which means the Moon rose there at 20:29 UTC. The eclipse lasted util 20:51 UTC, so people in Salvador could catch the last 20 minutes or so of the eclipse.


Here is the moonrise info for Atlanta:

Link to full size image
This tells us that moonrise in Atlanta on August 7, 2017 was at 20:35 local Atlanta time, which is UTC-4 (UTC-4 because it was "Daylight Time" in August; Standard time is UTC-5). That means the Moon rose in Atlanta at 00:35 UTC (it was past midnight UTC). The eclipse had ended 3 hours and 45 minutes earlier.



You can't use timezones in this case as a means of geographical measurement, because timezones are irregularly shaped, and the cities in question might be at far ends of their respective timezones, which is in fact the case here.

Atlanta is in the UTC-5 timezone (UTC-4 during "Daylight Savings Time"). However, it is very far west in that timezone; it is almost in the UTC-6 timezone (UTC-5 during "Daylight Savings Time"). In fact, there are places at the same longitude as Atlanta that are in the UTC-6 timezone, such as much of Central America.

Salvador Bazil is in the UTC-3 timezone; Salvador does not observe anything like "Daylight Savings Time". However, it is very far to the east in that timezone, very nearly in the UTC-2 timezone.



Atlanta being so far west in its timezone will have the Moon (and Sun and stars) rising later than some other places in the same timezone that are farther east. Salvador being so far east in its timezone will have the Moon rising earlier than some other places in that same timezone that are farther west.

In addition, I think that the curvature of the Earth is also affecting moonrise times, with Salvador being closer to the equator than Atlanta, PLUS the location of the Moon's orbit relative to Earth that day was more directly above Salvador than above Atlanta. That is to say, since the orbital path of the Moon is farther south of Atlanta than Salvador, there is more of the curved Earth "in the way" when viewing the Moon from Atlanta (more of the Earth's horizon would be in the way), which means the Moon would rise later over that horizon.

Those factors combined (longitude of the two places + Latitude of those places relative to the orbital path of the Moon) is why the Moon rose 4 hours and 6 minutes later in Atlanta than in Salvador.



edit on 30/1/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: RTLSLZ1

I'm using a phone and I also don't like viruses. Nothing personal. Just threat reduction. Thank you for your work.

Your data indicates 99.99 full is enough for an eclipse to be seen. At what reduction makes it not enough? .01? .06? Also not sure how refraction works with the elevation but I'll take your word for it that 1000' is irrelevant.

Yes these types of problems can be frustrating. I can only imagine how scientists feel when they try to explain a new discovery in which not enough evidence is there until much later.

If 99.93% was not enough to have shadow, then I would have to call into question the data sources for all data involved. I greatly doubt there was an "off wobble" and even more sincerely doubt we are wrong about what we saw and text messaged about.
I don't want to think there is some conspiracy going on, but I guess with an annual DOD budget of 500 billion they could hire a joker or two for patrolling sites such as this. Yes, I know 500 billion isn't that much, but after a few decades it adds up a little.

Hmmm.. This could be the greatest thing to hide of all time. Nobody wants to think we can't ever have a Jurassic Park due to gravity being stronger. Relating the atmospheric rivers to celestial events goes back to ancient Argha Noa times. I can see how they might want to cut out the first thought process so we don't dig to the next level of thinking...
So, extra gravity comes from extra mass, comes from space material (mostly forming water) creating atmospheric rivers creating storms creating rising sea levels.

So, extra gravity predicted for future would mean we would need long term plan: a better equipped human to handle it. Let me see... Ok, found good candidate: tiny people in Ecuador whom are mysteriously immune to cancer and Alzheimer's disease.


edit on 30-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Atlanta moon Azimuth = 106
Salvador moon Azimuth = 107

It seems they are nearly identical. Perhaps playing through the orbit times you could get it even closer, but probably doesn't need to be exactly the same anyway.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Atlanta moon Azimuth = 106
Salvador moon Azimuth = 107

It seems they are nearly identical. Perhaps playing through the orbit times you could get it even closer, but probably doesn't need to be exactly the same anyway.





I'm not sure what you are doubting.

Are you doubting the data that says Moonrise in Salvador was at 20:29 UTC and Moonrise in Atlanta was 00:35 UTC (which is a difference of 4 hours and 6 minutes)?

There are a bunch of different factors that go into moonrise times. Even if moonrise could be seen at 106 azimuth in Salvador compared to 107 azimuth in Atlanta, that is not the only factor. Think of the curvature of the Earth as a hill on the horizon (it's just an analogy, but it works). Less of the earth would be in the way of viewing the Moon from Salvador compared to Atlanta, so that "hill" (again, just an analogy) is lower, so moonrise would come earlier than timezones or the longitudinal distance of 46 degrees between Atlanta and Salvador would indicate.

Here's a visual illustration. Let's pick the point on Earth that is exactly east of Atlanta (at the same latitude as Atlanta) and exactly north of Salvador (at the same longitude as Salvador), and let's see what time the moon rose there. That location is in the middle of the Atlantic ocean:

Link to full sized image
This shows us that moonrise there was at 21:26 UTC. Compare this with the moonrise time for Salvador (at the exact same longitude). Moonrise in salvador was at 20:29 UTC.

So even though both locations were at the same longitude, the location in the mid-atlantic farther north of the orbital path of the Moon saw the Moon rise almost a full hour (57 minutes) later than the loaction in Salvador, which was closer to the orbital path of the Moon.

That difference is due largely to Earth curvature -- i.e., it takes longer for the Moon to rise above the additional part of the earth that is in between that mid-Atlantic loation and the Moon compared to the amount of Earth that is in the way bewteen Salvador and the Moon.


...but back to my original question:

Are you doubting the moonrise time data I linked that says Moonrise in Salvador was at 20:29 UTC and Moonrise in Atlanta was 00:35 UTC (which is a difference of 4 hours and 6 minutes)?



edit on 30/1/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: apdjbs1

Well my cheques must have been delayed no money yet you didn't see an eclipse because it was impossible plain and simple.

I spend lots of time looking at the night sky and photgraphing it everything has been explained you just ignore it your the one with the problem.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
a reply to: RTLSLZ1

I'm using a phone and I also don't like viruses. Nothing personal. Just threat reduction. Thank you for your work.

What is the point of even replying to you then if you won't even look at the calculations I'm providing for you? It doesn't have any virus.


Your data indicates 99.99 full is enough for an eclipse to be seen. At what reduction makes it not enough? .01? .06? Also not sure how refraction works with the elevation but I'll take your word for it that 1000' is irrelevant.

Yes these types of problems can be frustrating. I can only imagine how scientists feel when they try to explain a new discovery in which not enough evidence is there until much later.

If 99.93% was not enough to have shadow, then I would have to call into question the data sources for all data involved.

What you should be calling into question is your own belief that you saw an eclipse that night when no one else noticed anything off about it. The same spreadsheet correctly predicted the solar eclipse I witnessed two weeks later. I already explained the angular separation of the moon from the sun at the time it rose for you in Atlanta, and the fact that the earth's umbral shadow is nowhere near that large. So no, 99.93% full is not good enough. Neither is the 176 degrees of separation, it needs to be much closer to 180 degrees. Earth's umbral shadow has an angular diameter of only 1.4 degrees at the distance of the moon, so for there to be an umbral eclipse the moon has to be over 179 degrees in angular separation from the sun.


I don't want to think there is some conspiracy going on, but I guess with an annual DOD budget of 500 billion they could hire a joker or two for patrolling sites such as this.

Oh for Pete's sake, here comes the shill gambit.
edit on 30-1-2018 by RTLSLZ1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Yes, I'm doubting everything. So very many distractions here and I don't have the time and motivation to keep digging.

Someone else might be able to check out some old books to figure out if predictions have been tampered, or they might already know that 99.93% Full moon phase is good enough. Perhaps some other trick is at play.

All I know for certain is that I saw the eclipse, and this site (entire internet probably) is crawling with distractors. Some are unknowingly being useful tools by echoing various propaganda distractions or merely unknowingly copying falsified data, or meaningless bantering.

I couldn't care less if Trump came out as a secret sex partner of Putin. I'd rather know why there is so much uranium and lead in our water. Maybe nuking Nevada 900 times had something to do with it. I'd like to know why we no longer can use XrayFluoresence to see how much has accumulated in our bones. I'd like to know the real details about the many trillions of dollars lost by the Pentagon. Or the fact 1 out of 6 kids in the U.S. having learning disabilities according to CDC. How about someone writing a story about "An Inconvenient Nipple" and explaining why the US has 10 times the world average rate of being born with an extra nipple. We are a nation of mutants, of which we love to see the bad leaded painted apples paraded on the news before getting locked away in the massive prison complex. Gives new meaning to victim blaming.
So, this is all to say, you win, I'm out. I don't care enough about proving the eclipse. I care more about the fact it's been 3 years and billions of dollars later nothing has come out of the SWARM project on if the magnetic shield is still weakening at an accelerating rate.
I don't even care much about the extreme levels government's have gone to conceal history or the vast web of deceit surrounding the Roman Cat holics and their Great Pyramid schemes.

I don't think it will affect humanity too much once it's popularly known our differences came through reproducing with pigs and other animals. There's plenty of fake data to hide that, so I'm certain it's easy enough to hide anything else.

As for mutants, well true tetrachromatic vision could easily be tested with printouts, but yet nobody wants to be a millionaire by being first to market. Perhaps that would lead to a new type of racial discrimination.

I've discovered that I can set off Geiger Counters through somatic cortex activity, but it sounds as ridiculous as the guy that had ability to brew beer in his stomach until it was given a name - autobrewery syndrome.
I'm aware mutations are rarely a good thing and I see no benefit in setting off Geiger Counters.

I don't know how many of us mutants are out there, but I bet it's a better story than anything on this site.

I could go on for days, but for what? Just another ranting Luna tic talking about seeing things that others can't see...

Now, here comes the cherry pickers...
edit on 30-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People
Yes, I'm doubting everything. So very many distractions here and I don't have the time and motivation to keep digging.

Someone else might be able to check out some old books to figure out if predictions have been tampered, or they might already know that 99.93% Full moon phase is good enough. Perhaps some other trick is at play.

I personally don't know about the 99.93%.

The way I figured it (using my personal logic, which I admit might be wrong), I thought it was 99.09%. Here's how I figured it:


-- The period between two full moons varies due to orbital eccentricities, but it averages about 29.5 days. At the time of the August 2017 lunar eclipse, the time between full moons was 29.36 days.

-- 29.36 days x 24 hours = 704.64 hours between full moons. Let's call it 705 for simplicity.

-- Each 1-hour period represents about 0.142% of 705 hours.

-- The moment of Moon fullness on August 7 occurred at 18:10 UTC. The Moon rose in Atlanta that night at 00:35 UTC (which was actually August 8 UTC, becasue it was 35 minutes past midnight UTC).

-- 18:10 UTC to 00:35 UTC is 6 hours and 25 minutes, or (in decimal terms) 6.42 hours.

-- 6.42 X 0.142% = 0.91%

So in the 6.42 hours that passed from the moment of Moon fullness to the time the Moon rose in Atlnata, it seems to me that it would be 0.91% less full....

Which equates to 99.09% full at 6.42 hours after fullness.

Another way to do it would be to day that 6.42 hours is 0.91% of 705 hours. It's the same answer.

Maybe RTLSLZ1 can explain why my answer is different than his calculation (and if my logic seems sound).



originally posted by: apdjbs1
All I know for certain is that I saw the eclipse, and this site (entire internet probably) is crawling with distractors. Some are unknowingly being useful tools by echoing various propaganda distractions or merely unknowingly copying falsified data, or meaningless bantering.

As I mentioned before, I think you could have easily seen a dark cloud covering part of the Moon and just thought it was the eclipse.

It's an easy mistake to make. I know I in the past have been foold by a cloud covering part of the Moon, making it seem that the Moon phase was different than what it was.


EDIT: fixed a minor rounding error.



edit on 30/1/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: apdjbs1
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People
Yes, I'm doubting everything. So very many distractions here and I don't have the time and motivation to keep digging.

Someone else might be able to check out some old books to figure out if predictions have been tampered, or they might already know that 99.93% Full moon phase is good enough. Perhaps some other trick is at play.

I personally don't know about the 99.93%.

The way I figured it (using my personal logic, which I admit might be wrong), I thought it was 99.19%. Here's how I figured it:


-- The period between two full moons varies due to orbital eccentricities, but it averages about 29.5 days. At the time of the August 2017 lunar eclipse, the time between full moons was 29.36 days.

-- 29.36 days x 24 hours = 704.64 hours between full moons. Let's call it 705 for simplicity.

-- Each 1-hour period represents about 0.142% of 705 hours.

-- The moment of Moon fullness on August 7 occurred at 18:10 UTC. The Moon rose in Atlanta that night at 00:35 UTC (which was actually August 8 UTC, becasue it was 35 minutes past midnight).

-- 18:10 UTC to 00:35 UTC is 6 hours and 25 minutes, or (in decimal terms) 6.42 hours.

-- 6.42 X 0.142% = 0.9106%

So in the 6.42 hours that passed from the moment of Moon fullness to the time the Moon rose in Atlnata, it seems to me that it would be 0.9106% less full....

Which equates to 99.19% full at 6.42 hours after fullness.

Another way to do it would be to day that 6.42 hours is 0.9106% of 705 hours. It's the same answer.

Maybe RTLSLZ1 can explain why my answer is different than his calculation (and if my logic seems sound).

The phase angle of the moon is calculated using the following equation. It's not just a straight linear function I'm afraid, that's where your calculations went wrong.

d = true longitude of moon - true longitude of sun
Phase = 0.5 * (1-cos(d))
h.dropcanvas.com...

And for what it's worth, SkySafari Pro on my phone also agrees with my calculation and shows a figure of 99.9% full at that time and location:
h.dropcanvas.com...

More importantly though, the moon-sun separation was 176.35 degrees at that time (both according to my calculations and according to NASA), but the angular diameter of the earth's umbral shadow is only about 1.4 degrees. That is the most important figure and directly shows an umbral eclipse of any kind was not possible at that time.
edit on 30-1-2018 by RTLSLZ1 because: (no reason given)



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