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Lunar eclipse Jan 31 2018. - off schedule, storms, etc

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posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 11:16 PM
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After lunar eclipse Jan 31 2018 I need observers to report if accuracy was off in forecasted schedule then answer the following: Did the eclipse start around 6AM EST and did you see the FULL moon rising at 6:30PM EST? (Check your local times in link)
www.timeanddate.com...

Some background: The August 7 2017 eclipse was observed outside of given schedule/location and therefore I'm curious to see if anyone else experiences this (for January 31 2018 eclipse).

Let us see if other things match last event:

Predicted eclipse was not expected to be seen from Atlanta, yet it was.

Predicted night was to be clear. Actual night was cloudy.

Predicted 10 day forecast was to be decent. Actually happened: 4 hurricanes lined up.

Predicted eclipse was to display small shadow at bottom. Actual: viewed moon with shadow positioned at top, with crescents pointed up.

So, let us see if there is relation to the atmospheric rivers being influenced with space conditions. My theory is yes it is.

Most likely the “clear night” prediction will be wrong and so will the extended forecast up until it becomes obvious the massive storms aren't quickly going to dissipate.

If you can't check the eclipse in the morning at least try to check the rising full moon in the evening. Thank you




posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 11:43 PM
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I also predict that absolutely no cataclysm will occur.

It may snow, though...

Al Gore's Global Warming hasn't visited North Idaho at all... and I am pi$$ed. We're feeling a bit left out.

2 days ago we had to have another foot of this supposed "global warming" plowed out of our driveway.
edit on 29-1-2018 by madmac5150 because: Global warming is freezing my ass off.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:27 AM
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Easy Jitters... you're coming at us with Clicks and Whistles...
a reply to: apdjbs1



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:56 AM
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a reply to: apdjbs1

I heard on top of the eclipse, its supposed to be a Super Moon, Blue Moon and Blood Moon all wrapped into one.
Should be a neat site.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 06:56 AM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
Let us see if other things match last event:

Predicted eclipse was not expected to be seen from Atlanta, yet it was.


Please provide evidence that the eclipse was visible from Atlanta.
This photo series was made in Malaysia between 1:19am and 3:29am MYT on August 8th, which was 17:19 to 19:29 UT on August 7th, which was 13:19 to 15:29 EDT in Atlanta - mid-afternoon hours before the Moon rose.



Predicted night was to be clear. Actual night was cloudy.


Then how do you know the eclipse was visible?


Predicted 10 day forecast was to be decent. Actually happened: 4 hurricanes lined up.


There were only 2 Atlantic Hurricanes in the 10 days to either side of August 7 (Franklin, which hit Mexico, and Gert, which missed North America completely). This is not unusual for hurricane season in any given year.


Predicted eclipse was to display small shadow at bottom. Actual: viewed moon with shadow positioned at top, with crescents pointed up.


Please provide evidence for this.
Photographs of the event show that the southern highlands of the Moon were in the shadow. At the time, the Moon was 15° south of the celestial equator. Looking at the lunar disk at moon-rise, the eclipsed portion would have been to the right. At moon-set, it would have been to the left. At "high moon" from anywhere in the northern hemisphere, the eclipsed southern highlands would have been closest to the horizon, i.e. "down".


So, let us see if there is relation to the atmospheric rivers being influenced with space conditions. My theory is yes it is.


My prediction is that this thread is headed for the Skunk Works.


Most likely the “clear night” prediction will be wrong and so will the extended forecast up until it becomes obvious the massive storms aren't quickly going to dissipate.


WHICH clear night prediction? You do know that lunar eclipses are visible from half of the Earth, don't you? Are you proposing that all or most of that half of the Earth will have clouds or storms? If so, please post the weather forecasts for as many cities as you want (10 - 20 ought to be a good, representative sample) NOW, so that on the day after the eclipse we can check the actual weather and see how much it deviated from the predictions, and in which direction.

Thank you.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: apdjbs1

I heard on top of the eclipse, its supposed to be a Super Moon, Blue Moon and Blood Moon all wrapped into one.
Should be a neat site.

Well, to be fair, a blue moon doesn't necessarily look any different than other full moons.

The definition of a blue moon is the second full moon in a calendar month. Or sometimes it is defined as the 3rd full moon of a season (winter, Spring, etc) that has a 4th full moon.

Generally, a season has 3 full moons, and a year has 12, but occassionaly (an NOT extremely rearley) a year has a 13th full moon (or 4 in a season/2 in a month).




edit on 29/1/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

Honestly I don't care about proving the past, I just want you to see for yourself. So check your local conditions and check the timing of either the start of the eclipse or the start of the full moon. Ideally you could check both, but mainly check the start of the full moon as it should appear as the sun goes over the horizon.

I don't know how long it takes for storms to turn into hurricanes but at least one of them started in August and picked up speed in September:
weather.com...

You can use software such as Google Sky (android phone) or Stellarium to see the full moon was indeed clipped by the ecliptical line at precisely 9:15PM eastern time as viewed from Atlanta. Stellarium has a kink in their ecliptical line for some reason therefore it almost missed this one. Google Maps however still shows it quite clearly. Just use the "time travel" option and plug in the variables or just trust this:



The prediction for the night was to be clear, but it became cloudy with fast moving high altitude clouds and I got lucky to see the moon for a couple of minutes. I thought it looked interesting so I sent off a text message about it. Weeks later I found out it was suppose to be a full moon that night so I investigated.
Look, I'm not trying to sell anything or get attention. I don't expect anyone to just believe me. I'm just stating what I know just in case events get repeated in which at least there will be more witnesses. I'm a hardcore "mainstreamer" and probably wouldn't believe anything in these forums, but I don't trust that 115 ton Sauropods ran around having femurs only twice the diameter of an elephant. So maybe I'm not so mainstreamer after all.
That extra mass came from somewhere, and I'm guessing it was mostly ice from space which turns into atmospheric rivers like we had accumulated in August-September. Where did the extra water go? My next guess is that they drilled miles deep into massive underground caverns but that could cause a momentary receding of shoreline somewhere and would be noticeable.

Anyhow that's just a thought, just let's see what happens with this eclipse and don't get distracted with all the goofy Niberu talk which most likely is the disinformation project which keeps people looking in wrong directions.


edit on 29-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

I think what apdjbs1 is referring to is his claim in another thread that his astronomy app (like Stellarium or Google sky) was showing conditions in Atlanta at that time that SHOULD have resulted in the lunar eclipse that much of the Earth saw that day also be visible in Atlanta, but there was none visible.

His claim is that, according to the astronomy app, the full Moon rising in Atlanta that night (August 7, 2017) was intersecting with the ecliptic -- which means there should have been at leas a partial lunar eclipse. However, what he doesn't seemt t understand is the the Moon crosses the ecliptic all the time -- twice a month -- and does NOT always result in a Lunar eclipse. The Moon needs to be very close to the "Full" stage for the eclipse to occur.

The specific part of my argument that he did not seem to understand (or accept) in that previous thread was that by the time the Moon rose in Atlanta that night (it rose a little before 9:00 PM local time, U.S. Eastern Daylight Time) the moon was about 7 hours past the official "full" phase...

...Which is to say that (in astronomical terms) the Moon was no longer astronomically officially full -- at least not enough for the "intersecting with the ecliptic" to still be resulting in a lunar eclipse at that particular time.

At the time the lunar eclipse had ended that day, the Moon was still below the horizon in Atlanata, thus not visible.

Here is that other thead about the August 7/August 8, 2017 lunar elcipse:
www.abovetopsecret.com...


The tl;dr version of all of this, including that other thread:
You need a full-or-very-close-to-full moon for a lunar eclipse, and the moon was too far past "technically" full when it rose in Atlanta that night for an eclipse.



edit on 29/1/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: apdjbs1

I think you may have it wrong. The full eclipse was in a limited viewing area but it was viewable outside that area to lesser degrees both North and South of its path.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Climate and weather are not the same thing.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 10:13 AM
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No. It is simply not true that the "full" moon crosses the elliptical twice a month. To claim that, or worse -(to claim I "think" that, or whatever is being claimed that I'm thinking) is absurd and unnecessarily combative.

Even after the eclipse I saw had completed the FULL moon was still listed with the exact same luminosity as it had started earlier in the day.

The moon was greatly in line with the Sun and Earth, enough so as to continue the eclipse that supposedly was to have stopped in Brazil about an hour previous...NOT "many hours over".

If someone reading this is local to near Atlanta then I could show two phones where me and someone else texted about the "bowl shaped moon" long before realizing it was supposed to have been full.

It doesn't matter though, there will always be the ability to say I modified or preplanned or whatever.

Google Sky for android is the only app that shows the ecliptical in it's most accurate form. Not sure if it's related but:
Google Maps for android is the only app that shows the tip of the Great Pyramid being "PERFECTLY" at the speed of light coordinate. Even shows the pyramids as the first screen when opening the app.

After witnessing the "unseeable" lunar eclipse I've been propelled to unravel more mysteries and have since discovered about 42 of them. If someone in the area wants to make a bet - I can guarantee I can show something they can't explain without having to claim it's an unexplainable magic trick.

For now, I don't want want to distract from the lunar eclipse and the full moon timing plus any after effects observations. Check it. Thank you

Side note- (I exceeded the time to edit the comparison about the Sauropod's femur. Meant to compare it to diameter of elephant femur rather than diameter of elephant, but perhaps that is obvious to most.)
edit on 29-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
No. It is simply not true that the "full" moon crosses the elliptical twice a month. To claim that, or worse -(to claim I "think" that, or whatever is being claimed that I'm thinking) is absurd and unnecessarily combative.

No. The moon itself (full or otherwise) intersects the ecliptic twice a month.

The moon intersects the ecliptic during different phases during different lunar cycles. When the FULL Moon intersects with the ecliptic, that results in a lunar eclipse. The Full Moon would (by definition) intersect the ecliptic on the node directly opposite the sun. When the NEW Moon intersect the ecliptic, that would happen at the near node relative to the Sun, which results in a solar eclipse.

If the Moon is neither full nor new while intersecting with the ecliptic, then there would be no eclipse.

However, a full Moon is only "full enough" for about 5 hours or so for there to be a lunar eclipse (2.5 hours +/- before the point of fullness and 2.5 hours +/- after the point of fullness). On the day of the August 7th and 8th lunar eclipse, the "official" full Moon occurred at August 7 at 18:11 UTC, which was 2:11 PM local Atlanta time.

By the time the Moon rose in Atlanta, it was 8:35 PM local Atlanta time, which was 00:35 UTC on August 8. That is more than 6 hours AFTER fullness. So by the time it rose in Atlanta, it was not longer "full enough" from an astronomical standpoint for there to be an eclipse.




The Moon was greatly in line with the Sun and Earth, enough so as to continue the eclipse that supposedly was to have stopped in Brazil about an hour previous...NOT "many hours over".

Yeah -- it ended in Brazil at about 20:51 UTC. That's still about 3.5 hours before the Moon rose in Atlanta (the east coast of Brazil is relatively far east of Atlanta).



If someone reading this is local to near Atlanta then I could show two phones where me and someone else texted about the "bowl shaped moon" long before realizing it was supposed to have been full.

You said it was cloudy that night, so maybe the "bowl shape" of the Moon as seen from Atlanta was due to clouds partially covering
it (clouds that were too dark to see).



edit on 29/1/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: apdjbs1

I do not know where you are from but it is Winter here in America and that means a wintery sky. In most States, they will tell you if you do not like the weather wait 5 minutes.

WE or I am hoping for clear skies in my region but know the reality is at best 50/50.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: apdjbs1

No it's you that's combative.


The Moon is in orbit around the Earth, and with each full orbit it passes through the ecliptic twice. Once on its way up and once on its way down.


The Moon & Earth are always in motion once the lunar eclipse is over that's it.

The eclipse this week will not be visible in the UK were I live just like the last one wasn't from your location.


edit on 29-1-2018 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People
By the time the Moon rose in Atlanta, it was 8:35 PM local Atlanta time, which was 00:35 UTC on August 8. That is more than 6 hours AFTER fullness. So by the time it rose in Atlanta, it was not longer "full enough" from an astronomical standpoint for there to be an eclipse.

Bingo. The moon was 99.93% full by my calculations for Atlanta at that time, and the moon-sun separation was 176.35 degrees, significantly less than the 179+ degrees it was during the lunar eclipse earlier that day before the moon rose in Atlanta.
dropcanvas.com...



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: apdjbs1
No. It is simply not true that the "full" moon crosses the elliptical twice a month. To claim that, or worse -(to claim I "think" that, or whatever is being claimed that I'm thinking) is absurd and unnecessarily combative.

No.


Ok fine, we can agree to disagree. When the "full" moon crosses the ecliptical it is called an eclipse. Crossing any other time is irrelevant to the conversation.


You claim that because the moon was deemed "officially" as a full moon around 2pm (Atlanta time) that it couldn't possibly still be "full" 7 hours later, or more precisely it could not be in perfect enough position. This is still largely irrelevant to the question in topic.

I simply request for people to take notice of the scheduled times just in case they are also told the moon is "officially" full at 2pm and should not expect to see eclipse.

As for Salvador Brazil (the last place eclipse should have been seen) it was 1 hour difference on August 7th from my Atlanta/ Eastern Daylight Time zone. www.worldtimebuddy.com...

However, I did indeed see it hours after the "fact". I can envision a scenario in which it was known the atmosphere would become cloudy from an influx of interstellar material (yes we get plenty every day) but perhaps a large enough mass was expected to cloud visibility of the moon therefore they thought they didn't have to say it was going to look like it did (horns up) because that may be an indicator of future flooding and they didn't want people to realize there is a pattern and subsequently profiting, propheting, or panicking during future repetitions. Ancient Argha Noa events comes to mind.

So, those people that are on the officially "nonviewable" edges of lunar eclipses should take extra special notice, because it's the easiest thing to just look up for gods sake.


edit on 29-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 04:44 PM
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Here is something else to consider:
(Scroll down on the linked web pages for Salvador vs Atlanta moon rise times)
www.timeanddate.com...
5:29 pm ↑ (106°)

www.timeanddate.com...
8:35 pm ↑ (108°)

How can the moon rise 3hrs earlier for Salvador Brazil if they are only 1 hour difference from Atlanta (Eastern Daylight Time)?



edit on 29-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 04:55 PM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: apdjbs1
No. It is simply not true that the "full" moon crosses the elliptical twice a month. To claim that, or worse -(to claim I "think" that, or whatever is being claimed that I'm thinking) is absurd and unnecessarily combative.

No.


Ok fine, we can agree to disagree. When the "full" moon crosses the ecliptical it is called an eclipse. Crossing any other time is irrelevant to the conversation.

It wasn't full, so by your own admission, the moon as it rose on August 7th from Atlanta is not relevant to the discussion. It was 99.93% full, 176 degrees from the sun.
edit on 29-1-2018 by RTLSLZ1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:06 PM
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originally posted by: apdjbs1
Here is something else to consider:
(Scroll down on the linked web pages for Salvador vs Atlanta moon rise times)
www.timeanddate.com...
5:29 pm ↑ (106°)

www.timeanddate.com...
8:35 pm ↑ (108°)

How can the moon rise 3hrs earlier for Salvador Brazil if they are only 1 hour difference from Atlanta (Eastern Daylight Time)?




Oh my. You're confusing time zones with moon rise times? That's not how that works. Salvador Brazil is nearly 50 degrees in longitude east of Atlanta. It's also in the southern hemisphere, over 46 degrees south of Atlanta's latitude. You can't simply compare "time zones" and call it a day for calculating the expected time of the moon rising. From my spreadsheet (dropcanvas.com... ):


Year 2017
month 8
day 8
hour (UT) 0
minute 35
second 0
W Longitude (Decimal deg) 84.388
Latitude (Decimal deg) (N+, S-) 33.749
Height above sea level (meters) 0
Pressure (mb) 1013.25
Temperature (Centigrade) 25

Lunar Coordinates
Apparent Right Ascension at Equinox of date
Hours 21
Minutes 27
Seconds 16.09

Apparent Declination at Equinox of date
Degrees -15
Minutes -15
Seconds -6.02

Altitude (degrees) -0.16
Azimuth (degrees, 0 North) 107.76

Lunar Phase
Phase (percent full) 99.93%

Now plugging in for the coordinates of Salvador, Brazil:



Year 2017
month 8
day 8
hour (UT) 0
minute 35
second 0
W Longitude (Decimal deg) 38.5014
Latitude (Decimal deg) (N+, S-) -12.9722
Height above sea level (meters) 0
Pressure (mb) 1013.25
Temperature (Centigrade) 25

Lunar Coordinates
Apparent Right Ascension at Equinox of date
Hours 21
Minutes 26
Seconds 14.35

Apparent Declination at Equinox of date
Degrees -14
Minutes -42
Seconds -45.70

Altitude (degrees) 56.41
Azimuth (degrees, 0 North) 97.14

Lunar Phase
Phase (percent full) 99.93%

Orientation of Illuminated Portion Relative to Horizon (degrees from vertical) 67.11

So at the same time, the moon was 56 degrees higher in the sky as seen from Salvador. When did the moon rise from Salvador? Well you can ballpark the moon as having moved roughly 14.5 degrees per hour, so that's almost 4 hours before Atlanta. Indeed, if we go back to 20:29 UT on the 7th, 5:29 PM local time, we see:


Year 2017
month 8
day 7
hour (UT) 20
minute 29
second 0
W Longitude (Decimal deg) 38.5014
Latitude (Decimal deg) (N+, S-) -12.9722
Height above sea level (meters) 0
Pressure (mb) 1013.25
Temperature (Centigrade) 25

Lunar Coordinates
Apparent Right Ascension at Equinox of date
Hours 21
Minutes 19
Seconds 9.66

Apparent Declination at Equinox of date
Degrees -14
Minutes -58
Seconds -17.47

Altitude (degrees) -0.12
Azimuth (degrees, 0 North) 105.59

Lunar Phase
Phase (percent full) 99.99%



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: RTLSLZ1
Time zones matter. Do I really need to start an assembly to get that point across? Just kidding,


Salvador vs Atlanta moon rise times:
Salvador
www.timeanddate.com...
5:29 pm ↑ (106°)

Atlanta
www.timeanddate.com...
8:35 pm ↑ (108°)


Your source at moonrise:
Salvador
Azimuth (degrees, 0 North) 105.59
Phase (percent full) 99.99%

Atlanta?
Why no Atlant moonrise phase data?
Anyhow, at least you show it was full at
99.93% luminosity at around the time I saw it.

Perhaps it doesn't need to be 100%. Perhaps everyone has their own definition of "full". I once heard that a true 100% (straight line perspective) would mean the Earth would actually be blocking the Sun, therefore can't get to 100%. Others say a true full moon only lasts seconds.

Anyway I'll accept a 99.93 illuminated moon as being capable of demonstrating a shadow even if it falls out of perfect parameters of being newsworthy or whatever.
Also, 99.93% seems very susceptible to being within a margin of error which could then result in what I witnessed.
Let's not let Earth wobble truthers get this info.

Here's to looking up January 31st.

edit on 29-1-2018 by apdjbs1 because: (no reason given)



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