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Meaning of “never look a gift horse in the mouth” outside the West.

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posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 09:20 PM
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So I can easily look up the etimology of the words and I understand the western definition.

Which is, “ if given something of value , do not question it.”

It comes from the old way to test a horses Age was to check his teeth. So before you buy a horse, you would “look it in the mouth to check its age and have a better grasp of its value.

The saying is really assuming that a horse, any horse really has inherent value.

So if you are ever given a horse for free . There is no need to check its teeth. Every horse has value . So you just take the horse without bothering to check its teeth..


Well I want to know if this saying is universal or if in other, specificlly cultures outside the west, it would be misunderstood.




posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox

The reason I am asking is because it a seems to be universal across the West..

America , England, Spain and Greece all Ahmad the same saying, so I wonder about Asia Africa and the ME.



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 09:44 PM
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edit on 28-1-2018 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 10:37 PM
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I'm pretty sure the intent of the saying is about manners. Being that it's rude to look at the value of a gift rather than just accepting it with grattitude



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: caterpillage

Same difference..

I would like to find someone with knowledge of Asian of middle eastern culture to know if they have the same saying.



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox




Same difference..


Meh kinda


I would like to find someone with knowledge of Asian of middle eastern culture to know if they have the same saying.


My guess would be no, they don't have the same expression. I'm sure there are other proverbs that mean the same thing though. I'm sure if someone knew enough about horses they would figure it out.

I tried looking into it a bit but all I got was the same information over and over. Why are you curious?



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

BS college project..

I actually found it in both mandarin and some Arabic paper on proverbs..

Horses were so widespread and the first written account of the saying is 400ad..

It could literally be universal except for the couple cultures without horses.. inuit/some jungle tribes, exc.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

The reason I added “something of value” to the definition is because if someone gives you nuclear waste, you should definitely “ look it in the mouth.”

Lol



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox

Ahhh. Guess I'm actually not surprised it's widespread, though I would have thought the phrasing would have been different. I'd actually be pretty interested to see when certain areas first domesticated horses on a map. Wonder how it correlates to other things like agriculture too. I get what you're saying about it having value, you're not going to accept a garbage can full of garbage.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 01:06 AM
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Self censored.


edit on 29-1-2018 by Mike Stivic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: Mike Stivic

Don't be a candy ass



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 06:49 AM
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I would expect the phrase originates in a more eastern europe/westrlern asia, where horses were culturally dominant. Khan captured parts of Europe, and many Europeans owe lineage to Scythians.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 06:59 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Maybe.. the oldest known account is 400 as lol.. that’s crazy lol..


That predates Attila (I think Attila too) and the khans..



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: JoshuaCox
a reply to: JoshuaCox

The reason I am asking is because it a seems to be universal across the West..

America , England, Spain and Greece all Ahmad the same saying, so I wonder about Asia Africa and the ME.
Maybe it's 'don't look a gift camel in the mouth...Or elephant...



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 08:10 AM
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My personal therapy musk ox is offended, we will be retaining Johnny Cochran, and suing all species for all monies everywhere.
This is clearly xenophobia.

Lol.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:05 PM
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It comes from the Greeks and the Battle of Troy. It is the story of the Trojan Horse where the Greeks made a hollow horse statue they left outside of the fortified wall of Troy. Thinking the statue a gift, it was brought within the walls. During the night, the Greeks hopped out and attacked the sleeping Troy soldiers.

The saying takes on the meaning of, "A gift may have another motive."

Very funny when Monty Python leaves a Trojan Rabbit outside the French castle but forget to get inside!



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: Iscool

Certainly not an elephant. The costs of maintaining an elephant could bankrupt moderately wealthy people. Its the basis of the term "white elephant gift".



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: Mike Stivic

I was pretty drunk last night, sorry if I was a dick. I can't remember what you said.



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Ohhhhhhhhhhh I never got that and never thought to look it up!



posted on Jan, 29 2018 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Only if the meaning has been totally flipped around lol..


The etemology clearly states It means not to question a gift..

A proverb about the trogan war would be TO QUESTION gifts. Lol..




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