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USAF begins Massive GPS blackouts

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posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

When did these people sign their NDA's?
Ring laser gyro could be reset manually over any known coordinate.
Not sure why they would want to limit Cell phone service on commercial flights.




posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

Because for years it was believed they'd interfere with the aircraft. There was even a crash in Europe that was blamed on electronics in the cabin. And like everything else in the industry, barring a good reason, it's easier to leave a ban in place than change the rules.
edit on 1/27/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

I think they only limit cell phone use because they don't work very well if at all when you're that high above the cell towers.They use antennas that are designed (and only have short range) to have coverage at the same height above ground as the cell tower.

Radios and other similar devices have always been banned from commercial flighs.Without going into too much detail on how a superhet radio receiver works,they (MW radios mainly from memory) emit a low level signal on the same frequency as the NDBs (Non Directional Beacons).In some cases it was said it might be possible for the NDB receiver to point at a passengers portable radio instead of the ground based beacon they were supposed to be using for navigation.
They used to make (maybe they still do) an unpowered radio receiver that could be used just to listen to the pilots transmissions.It was like a VHF version of the old fashioned crystal sets that use the small voltage generated by the tuned circuit that could be used to drive a pair of small earphones.Because they didn't have batteries,they didn't emit any signals of their own,so where considered completely safe for use on aircraft.
edit on 27-1-2018 by Imagewerx because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

It was like that for years with atomic clocks.
The underlying quantum frequency is rock solid but it can take a month to sync the signal.
Rubidium clocks supposedly keep time even when they are powered down which is kind of telling.
The required factoring could rival cracking the chain block of a crypto currency.
Might still be some quantum secrets out there that could be discovered by ATS members that haven't signed a NDA.

Still 1899 and the planck time limit is 5.39 × 10 −44 s.
I remember reading that the whole quantum universe may resonate at that frequency.

If the quantum resonance really is rock solid common sense would seem to suggest the longer you wait the more accurate the synchronization.
For example if you waited 6 months you might get a 10^-53s synch accuracy?
edit on 27-1-2018 by Cauliflower because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:04 PM
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It appears that at least the shipping industry is going to create a backup system using eLoran.


The risk to GPS has caused a number of countries to take a second look at terrestrial radio navigation. Today there's broad support worldwide for a new radio navigation network based on more modern technology—and the system taking the early lead for that role is eLoran.
...
The administrations of both George W. Bush and Barack Obama pushed for a national eLoran system, but their efforts were never funded by Congress. However, the version of the Department of Homeland Security funding bill for 2018 just passed by the House of Representatives in July includes language calling for DHS to fund the construction and maintenance of a new eLoran system "as a complement to, and as a backup for" the GPS system. And the South Korean government already has pushed forward plans to have three active eLoran beacons by 2019—that's enough to provide accurate fixes for all shipping in the region should North Korea (or anyone else) attempt to block GPS again.

arstechnica.com...

edit on 1/27/2018 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

The military all ready has back up systems. And even have satellites with directional capabilities. This means they can increase the signal to an area. Also military uses two signals and can use l4 for ionasphere corrections.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr

And those will be some of the first to go, which is why they're training without it.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr

The non military could use some help which is most likely the major target group. As mentioned by Zap, who knows what is left after some negative event though.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:49 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: dragonridr

And those will be some of the first to go, which is why they're training without it.


GP'S III was designed to prevent jamming it uses M code to prevent jamming of frequencies. There is ways for the military to get around jamming they just need practice.


en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Who said anything about jamming? Antisattelite weapons are out there and proliferating.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr

They have been relying on a faster clock to synchronize communications for years.
Can't imagine a civilian based system needing that kind of speed except maybe the above nets and that used to be under military supervision.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Cone.




posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 09:08 PM
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a reply to: SkeptiSchism

That too.



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 09:21 AM
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Anyone think the test might have something to do with all these "mini satellites" they have been putting up there? The Iridium spacex launch was said to be placing some more up there. Private companies are using them, Viasat is about to offer unlimited internet and cell anywhere is the US. Even in Canada at my local Wal-Mart I have seen a new satellite cell company offering unlimited data anywhere, cannot remember the exact name but it's close to Skynet (lol). There is another new Canadian satellite based cell that has just come out called Lucky mobile. I would imagine this could be an alternative communication infrastructure for the military as well, I don't pretend to know all the workings of communication in all its complexities today but I would guess having these dedicated "mini satellites" might make hacking directly into comms more complicated. Also if the ground cell towers etc. were to be knocked out somehow, like an emp, maybe these new systems would still function? Just a guess. These private companies are quickly putting them to use, why wouldn't the military as well?



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 05:36 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: SkeptiSchism

Yes. Think of it as an upside down wedding cake. On the ground, unless you're right next to it, you won't notice it. At 50 feet, it jams a couple miles on either side. At 50, 000 it reaches all the way to Baja.


Hmmm. So hikers around Mt Whitney ( about 200 miles West) and Telescope Peak ( about 11,000 feet) Death Valley National Park, will loose GPS.



posted on Jan, 28 2018 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: Violater1

I'm pretty sure it won't kill them, any more than it will cause planes to go off course and have problems.



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