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Why does it seem so few will accept the obvious?

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posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 08:17 PM
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Originally posted by SomewhereinBetween
The Egyptian ruler:

Middle Kingdom wooden rod fragments from Lahun and Abydos
New Kingdom wooden and stone rods placed in elite burials, some inscribed, some gifts from king
Late Period inscribed stone rods deposited in temples as offerings


Good find SWIB. I don't know why nobody has replied on it yet. I haven't had time to look into it much yet because I'm about to have to leave, but does the source give the measure of the increments on those rulers? That should just about answer the question, shouldn't it?




posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 08:38 PM
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Originally posted by The VagabondGood find SWIB. I don't know why nobody has replied on it yet. I haven't had time to look into it much yet because I'm about to have to leave, but does the source give the measure of the increments on those rulers? That should just about answer the question, shouldn't it?
I don't know if the source did or not, my search was for pictures of these rods, I neither kept the link nor looked back to see if I posted same. However from one of my books on Egypt by Ian Shaw and Paul Nicholson in associaton with the British Museum:


The main unit of measurement was the royal cubit (52.4cm), approximately the length of a man's forearm and represented by the hieroglyph ?? (wish I knew how to show it). The royal cubit comprised 7 palm widths each of 4 digits of the thumb width (thus 28 digits to the cubit). Artists generally used a grid to lay out their drawings, and until the end of the Third Intermediate period they used the short cubit of six palms (44.9cm) which was roughly the length from elbow to thumb tip, conventionally 45cm.


There is more about usage in later periods of the Persian cubit.


A number of measuring rods, including the wooden examples used by craftsmen and surveyors, have survived. The most detailed knowledege of the cubit derives not from workaday measures, which could vary considerably, but from ceremonial cubit-rods cut in stone and deposited in temples, or occassionally buried with officials. These were also inscribed with other useful information such as inundation levels or references to nomes (provinces), forming a kind of a compendium of the sort once found in school exercise books in Europe.
This book also includes two pictures of rods, both of which have equally spaced lines, one even looks much like a ruler with its lesser cm markings, as well as equally spaced grooves but spaced wider apart than the lines, obviously for less intricate measure and longer measure.



posted on Mar, 20 2005 @ 01:40 PM
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Everyone, allow me to present exibit A.






posted on Mar, 20 2005 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by SomewhereinBetweenThis book also includes two pictures of rods, both of which have equally spaced lines, one even looks much like a ruler with its lesser cm markings, as well as equally spaced grooves but spaced wider apart than the lines, obviously for less intricate measure and longer measure.


Through the ratio of 7:11 there is a direct relationship between the three main elements in architecture, the square, the triangle and the circle. In the case of the Great Pyramid the circle is unseen, which equates with how it is often perceived in mystical tradition representing infinity, or the element of the divine.

The two numbers 7 and 11 can also be found woven into other elements of the pyramid's design. For example the height of the King's Chamber is 11 cubits and there are 7 corbels to each side of the Grand Gallery.


The first 7 11.......mystery solved.



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