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Boeing Tariff request against C Series thrown out

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posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 01:56 PM
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www.bbc.co.uk...

Boeings attempt to have punitive tariffs applied to the C Series hen imported or assembled in the USA have been thrown out by the ITC who have ruled 4-0 that Boeing were not harmed or disadvantaged by Delta buying a class of aircraft that Boeing does not even offer. Quelle surprise.

Last I heard Boeing were perusing a partnership (or buyout?) with Embraer in a move than will redress the balance somewhat now that the CSeries is effectively an Airbus product. One hopes they have taken steps to ensure E-Jets are assembled in the USA when purchased by domestic operators. It would be ironic if Airbus somehow did the same to them.
edit on 26-1-2018 by waynos because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: waynos

Actually, I am surprised. I figured it would go to court and get tossed, not the ITC.

The Boeing/Embraer deal was originally talked about as a buyout, but later clarified as a partnership. I would assume they would be building the E-Jet in the US but no one has said anything beyond they're talking.
edit on 1/26/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:07 PM
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What depresses me most about Boeing, is they always come want to sue when they lose. How about building planes people want to buy offering attractive deals, like they do in other areas, rather than outrage that a customer may go elsewhere? I'm wanting to say 'ever since the KC-45', but I'm sure there was another high profile one before that?



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:14 PM
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They've just been too slow to react to the market like waynos said they haven't built a plane that the customers want I was actually surprised how many 737 max's they've sold.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: waynos

They started trying to screw the Air Force in 2001. They offered to lease 100 KC-767s, with the option to buy them at the end of the 20 year lease. The contract officer and her son went to work as executives at Boeing after she retired, which coincidentally was immediately after approving that deal.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

The 737 still is a good fit for the people that are buying them. They're about as far as they can go with it now though.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Its the more the cramming in of more seats like in the other thread when we were talking about them I wouldn't want to do a 4 hour flight in a slimline seat and hardly any legroom. As they are it's a really tight squeeze.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: waynos

They started trying to screw the Air Force in 2001. They offered to lease 100 KC-767s, with the option to buy them at the end of the 20 year lease. The contract officer and her son went to work as executives at Boeing after she retired, which coincidentally was immediately after approving that deal.

Well that doesn't sound dodgy at all does it...



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

I don't know about the Max, but the -700 wasn't as bad. But the airlines seem to think that size aircraft is a good fit for that range. I personally think they're insane, but unfortunately I don't run an airline. I'd like to see a mid-body that fits between the 757 and 767 for width.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

They wound up going to jail, with at least one Boeing exec after a lengthy investigation.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Woody510

I don't know about the Max, but the -700 wasn't as bad. But the airlines seem to think that size aircraft is a good fit for that range. I personally think they're insane, but unfortunately I don't run an airline. I'd like to see a mid-body that fits between the 757 and 767 for width.

I think that's a brilliant idea something a little wider where they can fit seats in not at the expense of legroom would certainly prove popular and no slimline seats.
Also I'm glad there was some justice done in the kc debacle and not just swept under the rug.

Flying on a 737 with Ryanair in June if I'm on a max ill get some pics and see what it's like.
edit on 26-1-2018 by Woody510 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

The 757 range is in a nice sweet spot. It's farther than a 737, but not much else fits that market. It's short enough that the 787 doesn't make sense, and the 767 isn't a great fit. But it makes a cattle car look comfortable.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The 757 was the first plane I ever flew on with Britannia it was a nice plane. Do they still produce them? Could they not update the production with some of the new composites and engines and make it far more efficient or would that require a lot certification?



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

They built a few stretched airframes for the -300, but they haven't built them in years. They could try for an neo or Max style release, but the airlines want something that has better range and lower operating cost.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

With all the new materials being used and composites will metal fatigue become a thing of the past soon? Also with the cabin pressure being lower on the Dreamliner will that increase the life cycle of the fuselage? I see the 787 10 got certified the other day
edit on 26-1-2018 by Woody510 because: (no reason given)



Came across these pics on twitter the other day as well and forgot to post them. Looks pretty cool what we're doing with new materials now.
edit on 26-1-2018 by Woody510 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

We won't see metal fatigue with the composite parts, but we'll see delamination of them. They've completed fatigue testing to try to understand how the fuselage will age, but both Boeing and Airbus are learning as they go.

The pressure difference might keep the fuselage from expanding as much as they do now, but again, they're still learning.



posted on Jan, 26 2018 @ 06:13 PM
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Ultraviolet degredation,wear and water ingress?



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm still not ruling out an Aloha Air or Comet-style catastrophic failure on a 787 or A359 before they sort out how to detect/manage fatigue and fuselage life.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Barnalby

No, and there very well could be. Sadly that's part of the process.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yep, just sucks to be the aircrew who draws that particular short straw.







 
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