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U.S. slaps steep tariffs on imported washers, solar panels

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posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

Trump's a legend. Wish we had him leading us in the UK. The whole thing's a con if they can make it cheaper the other side of the world than in our back yards. Someone is [pulling the wool over our eyes, fixing the exchange rates, buying politicians, a complete con. Trump wants locals to become producers again, actually make things again. He's a star. Trump for British Prime Minister please




posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: ufoorbhunter
He can be your President too! All you have to do is turn Brexit into a statehood application, and whalla! You guys can get your guns back too.



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 06:42 PM
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82% Of Whirlpool products SOLD in the USA are MADE in the USA.

Whirlpool, Maytag, Kitchen Aid, Kenmore, Amana, Estate, Ikea, Roper and others.

Just say'n




posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 07:05 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

Well ... since we have a fascist economy, we are also post-capitalist.

Capitalism died when the big corporations took over our government, and banks / other businesses became 'too big to fail'.

So, really, we are both post industrial and post capitalist.

Would be nice to get capitalism back, but probably won't happen in my lifetime.



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry

Hey come on man, I know you have seen the appliance sections a Lowes Home Depot or Best Buy. The prices are quite close in fact, sometimes cheaper domestically as I said in my example. The reason they make them overseas is because the profit margin or the company is higher.

Seriously if you have not been recently, check it out. You may be surprised.


You're talking to someone in the industry. Most of the 'domestic' appliances have their electronics and motors made overseas. My company's appliance division supplies many of the major brands including Kenmore and Whirlpool. I made myself clear when I said 100% domestic. The price will go up if you want all the componentry made here as well.



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 07:46 PM
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originally posted by: mikell
82% Of Whirlpool products SOLD in the USA are MADE in the USA.

Whirlpool*, Maytag, Kitchen Aid*, Kenmore*, Amana, Estate, Ikea* (this is actually Whirlpool), Roper and others* (many).

Just say'n



I'm gonna put an asterisk next to the brands we supply electronics and motors for (and in some cases build the whole damn thing).



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: Fowlerstoad


Absolutely you can watch the Fed buy bonds , and control the price of gold and silver, some algorithm seems to do it. But its not the real economy that they are controlling its the perceived economy via the manipulated information , as you said it was all to big to fail. But what we have is a steady decline instead. The rich bought their hard assets, the poor will be eating the left overs as usual.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
Well since you are not in China my friend, your only supporting the case that they are made in America. The tariff is on whole machines. Thats exactly what it says. Even the Chinese source their materials globally.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 08:08 AM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry

Well since you are not in China my friend, your only supporting the case that they are made in America.


They aren't 'made' here, they are assembled here. There is a difference between primary manufacturing and assembly. The later is a just a feel good moniker.


Even the Chinese source their materials globally.


I'm well aware of that.



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 08:11 AM
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Does local assembly not produce jobs? I'm confused.

I do agree with the larger point that without knowing what "Made in thee USA" means, it's sort of pointless.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

If that is accurate, which is highly doubtful in the first place, then you can bet it is because the retailer is taking a greater cut.


Lets say that a particular product costs $100.00 dollars US for a retailer to purchase from a Chinese supplier. Lets also say that the same type of product will cost them $250.00 dollars US.

In order to make the more expensive goods shift out the door, the retailer may elect to raise the price of the Chinese goods, and take a small hit on the profit from the USA made goods, making the prices look fairly similar. Of course, what the consumer rarely sees, is that the Chinese goods could have been made available much more cheaply at the retail end, and that far more of the money which the consumer pays for a Chinese product, goes not to the manufacturer, but to the retailer.

The cheaper the goods purchased by a retailer, the more profit they can make by making them appear to be on a par with a more expensive product. Now, if the manufacturing capability was not there on the Chinese end, and these things always fell to pieces within months, never served their lifetimes well, and all that jazz, this would fall apart pretty damned quickly, because the manufacturer would gain a poor reputation, and the prices charged for their goods would necessarily decline...

But that is not what has happened. The goods made by China are of low cost, and quite decent quality, steadily improving year on year, as it happens. I remember when made in China might as well have been a curse upon a product, but nowadays you can rely on Chinese equipment very handily, from tooling to computer chips, to stand up and do what it is designed to do, within certain parameters of course. Highly sensitive gear for military communications applications ought not be made with Chinese components, but consumer grade electronics? Hell, its solid stuff these days, for a low price.

If you are seeing Chinese parts and produce sold at a similar price point to a US made part or product, it is largely a result of choices made by retailers, rather than the actual cost of the goods themselves.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 11:18 AM
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Hey, now. Look right here:

money.cnn.com...

A week after the Trump administration unveiled tariffs of up to 30% on imports of solar panels, one of China's biggest manufacturers announced that it plans to open a new plant in the U.S.

JinkoSolar said in a statement Monday that its board of directors had given the go-ahead to "finalize planning for the construction of an advanced solar manufacturing facility in the U.S."

The statement suggested Jinko's decision was tied to the new tariffs, saying that the company "continues to closely monitor treatment of imports of solar cells and modules under the U.S. trade laws."



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

although it does create some work for US workers. Maybe not $30/hr....but some work is better than none.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 12:35 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
although it does create some work for US workers. Maybe not $30/hr....but some work is better than none.


I totally agree. I just don't want people to think when something says 'Made in America' it carries the same cache as it did a few decades ago. There are in fact wholly built in the United States appliances, with the minor exceptions of possibly micro-processors or LED chips, but those are not cheap, I can tell you from personal experience as I try to buy everything that is made here as much as possible.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

When I went looking for vape gear made in the USA i had a hard time. I didn't want unregulated hardware, nor did I want something aesthetically displeasing. So I settled on "Made in the UK" instead. Figured my buds across the pond were the next best thing.

But I do buy local first, Texas second, US third.



posted on Jan, 30 2018 @ 12:56 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
But I do buy local first, Texas second, US third.


I'm pretty much the same but sub New Jersey and New York for Texas since it is somewhat closer for me.

Not that I may not buy anything in Houston today.



posted on Feb, 2 2018 @ 05:43 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Some people will take this to mean that the policy is working.

It would be foolish to do so of course, since control of the company remains in China, meaning that the profits will be largely benefiting the wrong economy, but sure, party on dudes.



posted on Feb, 2 2018 @ 06:20 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: projectvxn

Some people will take this to mean that the policy is working.

It would be foolish to do so of course, since control of the company remains in China, meaning that the profits will be largely benefiting the wrong economy, but sure, party on dudes.


Would the local economy in Sunderland be better if Nissan pulled out? All the supply chain? All the jobs we are talking thousands and thousands and thousands. Would Crewe be better if Bentley pulled out? Would Swindon be better if Honda pulled out? Derby if Toyota pulled out? The companies may be foreign owned but if they employ local people what's the problem?



posted on Feb, 2 2018 @ 06:37 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

If someone gives you a horse, do you start examining it's teeth?

FFS man....jobs. The ones Obama said "arent coming back".

They want access to our markets and are willing to pay us to make their goods that they sell to us. It should put downward pressure on truck costs, which are only high due to tariffs relating to Germany.



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