It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Dollar Hegemony, Dying Fiat Currencies, Debt Problem... Economist-The Phoenix, 2018

page: 3
12
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 06:24 PM
link   
Aside from the bit of drama this guy has nailed it.

Personally I almost financially survived the 2008 crash, but unfortunately got blindsided with a divorce. lol

What concern's me about this time around it is a perfect storm brewing, and the absolute beating we are going to get will be unparalleled.






posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 08:04 PM
link   
a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

The current US Dollar is unconstitutional.

It should not be accepted by Americans, let alone anyone else in the world.

True constitutional dollars are defined by weights and measures of precious metal.

This paper debt money we are stuck with at the moment needs to burn.



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 08:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: ScepticScot
20 trillion in debt sounds a big scary number however.

Almost half of that is owned by the federal government itself via intergovernmental holdings and the federal reserve.

Of what remains almost half is owed to US financial institutions such as pension funds. So is an asset owned by the private sector.

About 6 trillion is owed to overseas entities (both private and government). And what really scary stuff can they do with it? Well they can buy things in dollars.

As long as the overseas owed part does not rise to to much in relation to the overall size of the economy then there is very little to worry about from the national debt.


Non-marketable US securities is a little over $6 trillion, but it's a misnomer really more like IOUs they can't sell them that's why they are called 'non-marketable' securities and yet our government is paying interest on those securities, probably to banks.

www.treasurydirect.gov...
edit on 23-1-2018 by SkeptiSchism because: sp



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 09:03 PM
link   
looks like a bitcoin to me



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 09:13 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults

more like a FEDcoin, or IMFcoin, or whatever the heck the central bank cartel want to force down our throats...

Federal Reserve May Introduce a Cryptocurrency....



posted on Jan, 23 2018 @ 11:29 PM
link   
a reply to: FamCore

FedCoin is several years away.

I wouldn't worry about it too much right now.



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 12:13 AM
link   

originally posted by: LogicalGraphitti

originally posted by: FamCore

against a basket of the G8 country currencies.....that dollar has lost 99 per cent overall......yep, we're at the bottom....i was at 45% lost in the 50's


Let's zoom out and take a look at the US Dollar. It's been steadily declining in value pretty much since March/April of last year, going from something like $101.74 down to just $90.47 today. That's not all that alarming in itself. However we should also take notice of the flattening yield curve - the gap between 10-year and 30-year US Treasury yields seems to be lessening. History has shown us that a flat or inverted yield curve spells danger.

The US Dollar is $90.47 cents of what? Is that against the Euro, Yen or something else?


Against a basket of the G8 country currencies and Gold
edit on 24-1-2018 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-1-2018 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 12:49 AM
link   

originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: ScepticScot

A lot has been written on this. I know exactly what money laundering is, and how QE was used to do it.

Where are all those toxic assets now?



You claimed the US monetized over a 100 trillion dollars of private debt. I would suggest the onus on proof is on you.

And no it doesn't matter how many times you claim it, QE is notmoney laundering.



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 12:53 AM
link   
a reply to: ScepticScot

No but it is illegal regarding the black letter law related to what kind of securities the fed can buy. By black letter law, they can only purchase US securities, treasury bonds, bills etc.

They have purchased over $2 trillion in MBS securities, which they then promptly turned over to JPM to administer and collect fees for servicing the instruments.



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 12:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: SkeptiSchism
a reply to: ScepticScot

No but it is illegal regarding the black letter law related to what kind of securities the fed can buy. By black letter law, they can only purchase US securities, treasury bonds, bills etc.

They have purchased over $2 trillion in MBS securities, which they then promptly turned over to JPM to administer and collect fees for servicing the instruments.



Would you care to show were it's been found to be illegal?



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 01:20 AM
link   
a reply to: ScepticScot

Buying toxic assets to increase the money supply is monetizing the debt.

That's what QE did.

That's another form of money laundering when you return the profits of illegal activity to the criminals.



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 01:46 AM
link   

originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: ScepticScot

Buying toxic assets to increase the money supply is monetizing the debt.

That's what QE did.

That's another form of money laundering when you return the profits of illegal activity to the criminals.


If 100s of trillions of debt had been monetized then the monetary base would have increased by that amount. 100s of trillions is a ridiculous exaggeration.

Toxic assets at not the proceeds of crime.

edit on 24-1-2018 by ScepticScot because: (no reason given)







 
12
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join