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Homeschooling does it need more regulation?

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posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 09:57 AM
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I have mixed feelings on homeschooling. I've known some parents that have taken their kids out of public school and have provided them with a superior education, social life and have well rounded educated kids.

Unfortunately on the other hand, I know a far too many that have pulled their kids out, and have basically robbed them of even the most basic education. Recent headlines have shown how hidden severe abuse can be under the guise of "homeschooling". How many more kids are out there like the 13? I think it is a dirty little secret nobody wants to talk about. What is considered abuse? If a high schooler has a 4th grade education is that abuse? If a 18 year old is unable to count money is that abuse? I know parents that have move to states that have the most lenient homeschool laws. Why is that? Some states parents can basically print out their own diploma like it's a regular graduation. Of course I am not saying that if one homeschools they are also abusing, but I think it is a lot easier to hide abuse when one is homeschooling than a child that attends regular school.


I'm with everyone else wanting less government, but I think with homeschooling the pendulum has swung too far in the other direction. I think these kids need to have at the very least basic education, and safe living. Testing should be required in a setting where their true knowledge is tested, not cheated out by their parents. Thoughts?




posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
I have mixed feelings on homeschooling. I've known some parents that have taken their kids out of public school and have provided them with a superior education, social life and have well rounded educated kids.

Unfortunately on the other hand, I know a far too many that have pulled their kids out, and have basically robbed them of even the most basic education. Recent headlines have shown how hidden severe abuse can be under the guise of "homeschooling". How many more kids are out there like the 13? I think it is a dirty little secret nobody wants to talk about. What is considered abuse? If a high schooler has a 4th grade education is that abuse? If a 18 year old is unable to count money is that abuse? I know parents that have move to states that have the most lenient homeschool laws. Why is that? Some states parents can basically print out their own diploma like it's a regular graduation. Of course I am not saying that if one homeschools they are also abusing, but I think it is a lot easier to hide abuse when one is homeschooling than a child that attends regular school.


I'm with everyone else wanting less government, but I think with homeschooling the pendulum has swung too far in the other direction. I think these kids need to have at the very least basic education, and safe living. Testing should be required in a setting where their true knowledge is tested, not cheated out by their parents. Thoughts?


I think there should be basic testing and maybe some standardized curriculum that parents can access. I certainly understand why some parents would want to home school given the indoctrination that is occuring in public schools and lack of focus on the basics.

My only real issue is that I believe home schooled kids don't get the social exposure needed for proper development. I've seen this with my toddler. We put him in day care while some of our friends stay home or use a nanny. The kids that stay home seem to be less developed socially as they aren't used to interacting with other kids.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 10:20 AM
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I'm always wondering about the amount of time and knowledge the parents have to invest in this.

A teacher here around has to have a university's degree, several "internships" (not really, but about the same) and the style and substance is subject to a biannual examination. Even for a elementary school teacher.

How to do this as a parent?
What is the resulting education compared to that of an ordinary secondary school like a gymnasium?



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 10:30 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
I'm always wondering about the amount of time and knowledge the parents have to invest in this.

A teacher here around has to have a university's degree, several "internships" (not really, but about the same) and the style and substance is subject to a biannual examination. Even for a elementary school teacher.

How to do this as a parent?
What is the resulting education compared to that of an ordinary secondary school like a gymnasium?


It doesn't take much to become a teacher. I'd venture most professionals have more knowledge the the vast majority of teachers. With that said, the one skill teachers do have is how to control a classroom and teach a large number of children. However, that isn't necessarily relevant to teaching one's own child.

I taught my toddler his numbers, abc's etc. We continue to supplement and teach him outside of school. If a parent is not working and has the focus and time, I don't see why a basic elementary education cannot be taught to a child. It isn't rocket science. The only area that I'd get concerned is as the child gets older, say middle school where harder math and science is taught. I'd venture most parents couldn't teach algebra, physical sciences, etc. However, there are certainly parents who are more than capable of doing so.

IIRC, I think a few of the spelling bee champs were homeschooled.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope

I've always wondered about that too. I know some parents do a hybrid homeschooling where they teach what they can and supplement with others what they don't know. Some also take kids to social groups. The problem is that some parents don't do anything, these kids are just watching tv, doing nothing.

Are some parents just using their kids for paycheck?

"Their mother home-schooled them, for which she was paid by the state, and that income, plus food stamps, was what the family lived on; "

Here is a family similar to the 13 that were just rescued.
nypost.com...



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 10:49 AM
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Half of my daughter's high school classes are a joke. And her friend at another local school has 7 classes in one day.
They can't possibly learn anything by being in class for that short of a time.

I don't think home school could do much worse than public schools.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

My only real issue is that I believe home schooled kids don't get the social exposure needed for proper development. I've seen this with my toddler. We put him in day care while some of our friends stay home or use a nanny. The kids that stay home seem to be less developed socially as they aren't used to interacting with other kids.


in some place they are letting home-school kids participate in local school activities (band, sports teams etc)

some public educators oppose this for political reasons that I won't go into here for fear of derailing.

plus I think the home school kids make the public school kids look bad
edit on 22-1-2018 by ElGoobero because: remove political content / reframe



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:01 AM
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I feel that breeding needs regulations! Then I try to figure out how to enforce it and I start feeling like Josefe Mengele.
I have always felt that a "village" type setting would benefit everyone more...then I start feeling like Warren Jeffs...
Some states do have regulations and requirements in place for homeschooling. (I looked into it many years ago when making the decision for my own daughter.) It would be interesting to compare success rates of states with low/no moderation vs high.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:10 AM
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Homeschool Anonymous

homeschoolersanonymous.org...



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: Vivyinsect

Whatever your percerption of it

You can google averages and testing stats and usually home school d kids are higher



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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originally posted by: [post=23070198]Vivyinsect[/post/]
I have always felt that a "village" type setting would benefit everyone more...then I start feeling like Warren Jeffs...



I like the 'village' concept, but what I see is huge centralized schools with hundreds, even 1000+ students. this saves money (supposedly) but large schools create a poor dynamic for learning and socialization. home-schooling is partly in reaction to these huge warehouse systems.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

I read about this "statistic" years ago, it is skewed. The problem with it is only a certain amount of homeschoolers are tested, if they tested everyone like public school it would be much much lower.

"Comparing a selected group of homeschoolers to a broader group of public schoolers is an apples and oranges comparison"
homeschoolsuccess.com...



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:19 AM
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originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
a reply to: Vivyinsect

Whatever your percerption of it

You can google averages and testing stats and usually home school d kids are higher



Only the positive is reported.

You rarely hear the other side of homeschooling.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: ElGoobero

originally posted by: [post=23070198]Vivyinsect[/post/]
I have always felt that a "village" type setting would benefit everyone more...then I start feeling like Warren Jeffs...



I like the 'village' concept, but what I see is huge centralized schools with hundreds, even 1000+ students. this saves money (supposedly) but large schools create a poor dynamic for learning and socialization. home-schooling is partly in reaction to these huge warehouse systems.


The key is parental involvement.

Kids in public school who's parents are involved and work with them do just fine.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

From what I see comming from public schools,I say let them teach at home,at least will learn to take care of themselves,not a mindless millenium,they have no knowledge of anything other then a video game



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:25 AM
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No, it doesn't need more regulation.

It can barely be called home schooling as it is because parents actually have very little choice already in what is taught.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: Tempter
No, it doesn't need more regulation.

It can barely be called home schooling as it is because parents actually have very little choice already in what is taught.


I used to think that until I did further research.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 11:34 AM
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This is based on only 1 year of online home-school experience.


I think it wouldn't hurt to have a tiny bit more. Though, with that being said I finished my senior year of high school with ECOT (which I heard closed down recently *cries*) and I did just fine. I learned a lot, got my diploma and felt prepared for the few college courses I did take. Didn't require any of my parents supervision or assistance as it was an online home school- so I imagine there are people with more valid opinions than mine who have done home school for longer than 1 year or even did it the old fashioned way.

Loved it because I only had to put in 20 hours a week and I could do 5 hours a day for 5 days a week or do 10 hours one day 10 hours another day and have the rest of the week to hang out at the skate park with the rest of my friends who asked their parents to allow them to do ECOT only to drop out and do nothing at all. I could do the units as quickly or as slowly (generally speaking obviously there were deadlines) as I wanted. I remember one class I finished the entire semester in a week and passed the test and was done with that quickly. Honestly it was the smoothest learning environment I've ever experienced and I wish I had done all of High-school through ECOT.

-Alee
edit on 1/22/2018 by NerdGoddess because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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Education should not be an arbitrary thing. No one is guaranteed the skills it takes, just by reaching a certain age.

If someone cannot pass a simple literacy test upon leaving school, then they should remain in school.

And literacy is not all that should be tested... look at the world today, it's full of young people who can't even change a tire. and they are the future.. god help us all, I'm glad I'm on the other side of the coin.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 12:56 PM
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I see homschooling opposing the state. Ultimately the state will win. This is just how nature works. What it comes down to is the sum total of humans has more value than individuals do. We're great because we soak up information so well and sacrifice ourselves for each other. This will likely intensify in the future, to the point where parents won't have any control whatsoever over their child.

Whole > part. Collective > individual.

But I think we'll always possess some individuality just because some autonomy is required, especially in suboptimal circumstances.

Government has a limited reach, so people on the frontier will always be the most independent. But that life is a hard one and most of us won't go that route.
edit on 1/22/2018 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)




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