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Texas judge interrupts jury, says God told him defendant is not guilty

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posted on Jan, 20 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: Azureblue
a reply to: kelbtalfenek

Texas judge interrupts jury, says God told him defendant is not guilty - was it God or was it his conscience?

Either way he should not have done it. No Law in any country where common law forms the basis of the law has the right to overule a jury.

Just goes to show much judges resent having some of their power away by common law.




Which is exactly why they "revised" the federal rules on grand juries. Couldn't have impartial and unbiased citizens indicting government officials, now can we?




posted on Jan, 20 2018 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: Meldionne1

First of, there is no law separating church and state. The only thing about church and state and religion is that the state cannot declare a state religion.

Some have interpreted the actual wording differently, but that's what it was about. It is also one way. Government cannot make laws establishing religion, individuals in government are free to practice their religion AND to govern as their conscience and their religion tells them to.

That being said, what this judge did was wrong. It's not his place to say anything to influence the jury, sincere or not. If God wants the person free, hell let a jury member know, not the judge.

My guess is that the judge has some other motive, either he's a customer, or hE was paid off, or he's a nutter that shouldn't be on the bench.


Jaden



posted on Jan, 21 2018 @ 01:45 AM
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originally posted by: JBurns

originally posted by: Azureblue
a reply to: kelbtalfenek

Texas judge interrupts jury, says God told him defendant is not guilty - was it God or was it his conscience?

Either way he should not have done it. No Law in any country where common law forms the basis of the law has the right to overule a jury.

Just goes to show much judges resent having some of their power away by common law.




Which is exactly why they "revised" the federal rules on grand juries. Couldn't have impartial and unbiased citizens indicting government officials, now can we?


exactly



posted on Jan, 21 2018 @ 01:53 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: Azureblue
a reply to: kelbtalfenek

Texas judge interrupts jury, says God told him defendant is not guilty - was it God or was it his conscience?

Either way he should not have done it. No Law in any country where common law forms the basis of the law has the right to overule a jury.

Just goes to show much judges resent having some of their power away by common law.



I would recommend you look up the basis of laws in the US
That way you wouldnt appear as ignorant. And I mean that dictionary definition wise , not as street slang. I wanted to verify that as well, just in case...


Righho lets take away 'common law' and insert any other kind of law likely to be law in the US. It still goes to show how judges resent having restraints on their power by laws that enable defendants to elect to have their case tried by jury.

TMOT we can conclude from this that many judges are not in favour of juries for that reaon.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 03:46 AM
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a reply to: Woodcarver

Well, specifically I would say that it does not matter whether he was or not.

It does not matter whether he was being spoken to by God, or any other entity. In the courtroom, the only things that matter, which must be taken into account, are the law and the ideals upon which it is founded, which, in a nation which even PRETENDS to separate church and state, must be absolutely beyond the reach of religious interference.



posted on Jan, 22 2018 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: kelbtalfenek

Well it say it on your 1 dollar bill.

"In God we trust"

Obviously so does this Schizophrenic judge.



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: kelbtalfenek

Yes, but this was Texas.



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 04:45 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

You have not been observing other Judges interventions in trials. It has happened before.

www.dailynews.com...



posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 04:47 AM
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a reply to: grey580

Texans



posted on Jan, 27 2018 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: kelbtalfenek

I consider myself a born again Christian, but that judge has crossed the line and needs to be disbarred, or sent somewhere on holiday for a long time.
No one gets to be the voice of GOD but GOD.
Or else, why do we put faith and trust in the concept of 'Trial by Jury'?
Though it appears such a sentiment is rapidly disappearing in the UK (don't know about the US other than this ATS snapshot)



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