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Why Not Have a PERPETUAL U.S. Budget. The Shutdown Drama is Rediculous.

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posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 12:36 AM
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January 17, 2018

AT LEAST once a year, we hear that the government is in danger of "Running Out of Money" unless Congress passes a short-term, or long-term budget.

We are now 3 days away from the government "shutting down", due to money not being appropriated by Congress.
Source: www.foxnews.com...

Since 1980, the Federal Government has shut down 6 times..most recently in 2013.
List of Shutdowns/Reasons/Duration: en.wikipedia.org...


TWO QUESTIONS FOR ATS MEMBERS:

1.) Have any of the past government shut-downs affected you in a negative way? The Mainstream Media is using dire words to describe how bad it will be for this nation, if the government starts closing down on January 20th.

2.) Why can't the Federal Government operate with a perpetual, ongoing budget, that's adjusted as needed? Tax revenue is perpetually coming in to the U.S. Treasury, and $560 million is printed by the U.S. Treasury, every single day. Uncle Sam never really "runs out of money".

The government should mimic how we run our households. As long as money is coming in, we pay the bills and buy things. The time, manpower, resources and political bullchit that's devoted to this U.S. budget ritual, which occurs AT LEAST once every year, is rediculous!

-CareWeMust


edit on 1/17/2018 by carewemust because: slight wording adjustment




posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: carewemust
Actually in 2013 the shutdown did screw me over. We were being discriminated by a potential apartment after already being cleared due to family size. The initial leasing agent had given us a green light, but when we went to finalize some paperwork she was busy on the phone, and instead of letting us wait her supervisor decided to step in. Probably wanted to steal commission or something. She tried to force us into a 3 bedroom instead which was not in the budget at the time. Went to arguing about wtf, what kind of sham # is this, we already proceeding.

I gave that # quite the verbal lashing and left and told her where to shove it all. Tried to get ahold of HUD and had as we had a proper case , many of which they have successfully argued under equal housing laws. Unfortunately the government shut down and so did the HUD offices. Put us in a bad spot as we already passed the window for re-lease of our current apartment. Explained it to them though, and since we had been great tenants at our current complex they ended up getting us into a better apartment closer to the front with an awesome lake front view with a huge living room wall (could fit six sixty inches TV if from my measurements) for a slightly lower price.

So while we were still a mile away from our job and down to only one vehicle instead of three blocks where the other apartments were, it worked out. It was only about a ten to fifteen minute bike ride for me. We finally got a call back after the new year when HUD case workers were catching up with their workload lol. Told them it was all over by that time.

Thats my story of the one time I was affected by a government shutdown. I guess it was not really a big deal though lol.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:14 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

What is amazing is that when the government shuts down, congress keeps getting paid.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:28 AM
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I personally know people who were not able to go to work during the last shutdown (they did not lose pay for that, as Obama signed a bill into law that reimbursed them for their lost hours), and I was participating in a vocational rehabilitation program that was suspended for a few days. I got warnings that the program could end for an indefinite amount of time in the mail.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:28 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

Your experience tells me that personal determination, combined with intelligent use of your good common-sense, made HUD intervention unnecessary. If the government was not shut-down at that time, and HUD intervened, you could have ended up in a worse position. At the very least, you would have had to invest quite a bit of additional time with phone calls and paperwork, don't cha think?



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:28 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

How can anyone be the "new broom" or "swamp drainer" if you don't throw out the baby with the bath water...

... every - single - time?



edit on 17/1/2018 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:29 AM
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It seems like a waste of time but IMO the budget is put in place as a control to prevent uncontrolled spending. Its comparable to a family debating whether to withdraw from the savings account to cover expenditures.

Of course the government's savings account is limitless. Everyone that creates an expenditure for the government will get paid what is owed after the withdrawal is made.

The US Government has an endless supply of assets for expenditures and emergencies unless it goes bankrupt which is very unlikely for the USA. It only takes legislation to get what they need.
edit on 17-1-2018 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:30 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: carewemust

What is amazing is that when the government shuts down, congress keeps getting paid.


Also, government employees get days, or weeks-off, but no loss in pay. They get reimbursed retroactively when the government re-opens, as if they actually worked all those days.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

How would have HUD put them in a worse position, exactly? I mean, I would definitely not be opposed to doing the paperwork to get a cheaper monthly rent. Oh, I see, it looks like he ended up with a better deal than HUD would offer.
edit on 17amWed, 17 Jan 2018 01:34:55 -0600kbamkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:32 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: carewemust

What is amazing is that when the government shuts down, congress keeps getting paid.


Also, government employees get days, or weeks-off, but no loss in pay. They get reimbursed retroactively when the government re-opens, as if they actually worked all those days.


From the research I just did, that only happened last time because Obama signed it into law. Although it was passed in the House. Normally, the government workers lose out on pay.


During the shutdown, most non-exempt government employees were furloughed. That would have put about 800,000 public employees on indefinite unpaid leave starting October 1.[125] The White House estimated that a one-week shutdown could have cost the US economy $10 billion.



On October 5, the House unanimously passed a bill that would provide back pay to all furloughed federal employees after the shutdown is resolved, and Obama stated that he would sign the bill into law.


Wikipedia
ed it on 17amWed, 17 Jan 2018 01:33:21 -0600kbamkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:36 AM
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a reply to: darkbake


Yes, the first things to be shut down are what Uncle Sam determines to be "non-essential" services and agencies. You're also correct that government workers are given back-pay for the days they stayed at home.

I think non-government employees lose the most in a prolonged government shut-down. Particularly restaurants, drycleaners, and other businesses that are near larger government installations.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:39 AM
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originally posted by: darkbake
a reply to: carewemust

How would have HUD put them in a worse position, exactly? I mean, I would definitely not be opposed to doing the paperwork to get a cheaper monthly rent. Oh, I see, it looks like he ended up with a better deal than HUD would offer.


In his instance, it worked out for the better that HUD was closed due to the shut-down. But you're right. If HUD could have gotten him a better deal, the paperwork and meetings would have been worth it.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Non-government employees are called contract workers working under a paid contract, most have to work during a shut-down if it is permitted by the government employees supervising them. Otherwise, they are sent home and put on paid standby.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: carewemust

What is amazing is that when the government shuts down, congress keeps getting paid.


Also, government employees get days, or weeks-off, but no loss in pay. They get reimbursed retroactively when the government re-opens, as if they actually worked all those days.


During the last government shutdown in 2013, federal employees collectively missed 6.6 million days of work, according to Office of Mangement and Budget estimates. The 16-day shutdown cost the government roughly $2.5 billion in lost productivity.


source
And everyone got back pay, for not working. They kept taking our money while not working, it's disgusting.

A pipe dream that will never happen is that during a government shutdown, income taxes become null and void. I guarantee the government would never shut down again.
edit on 17-1-2018 by Vector99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:44 AM
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a reply to: darkbake


Yep..government shut-downs do reduce the amount of money entering our economy. But so do budget-cuts. On the other hand, maybe less taxpayer money is spent.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: eManym
a reply to: carewemust

Non-government employees are called contract workers working under a paid contract, most have to work during a shut-down if it is permitted by the government employees supervising them. Otherwise, they are sent home and put on paid standby.



I used the term "non-government employees" to mean those businesses and their employees that service government employees in cities and towns across America. (i.e. Waitress Susie at Hal's diner loses income every day the local EPA office is closed.)



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:50 AM
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And at 11;59;59 they'll approve the next trillion,its all theatre its all a show



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:51 AM
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a reply to: Vector99

Isn't it interesting how the government reports "lost productivity" dollars, like a private firm does? I'd like to know exactly what productivity is "lost", when a government employee gets reimbursed for missed pay.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:54 AM
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originally posted by: khnum
And at 11;59;59 they'll approve the next trillion,its all theatre its all a show


But why try to tie immigration-related stuff to it? Just pass the budget, and then work on immigration, just like they'll work on every other issue over the rest of the year.

Or even better, stop the annual budget madness. Just spend money and adjust each agency up/down, as needed. That's how consumers and businesses operate.



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 02:01 AM
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a reply to: carewemust
honestly I think your right. I imagine that lady would have made every attempt possible to make my life a living hell living there. And honestly, the environment was waaay nicer in the apartments I had stayed at. Better for the kids. The entire place pretty much resided under a canopy of oaks like a village hidden in a forest. The fact that it was right next to a train line and the route for incoming airplanes would probably make it uncomfortable for some, but it was always marvelous to the kids.

I even enjoyed the view better than the house I am living in today, and the only reason th was better was that it was mere blocks from the job. But in hindsight, I know I was better off where I stayed. The extended bike ride was therapeutic and good exercise as well. Not to mention we had better pools, with grills, a sweet gym, decent fishing. Honestly I am glad I did not end up in that place. I had a friend that lived there and also hated dealing with the leasing lady boss.
edit on 1-17-2018 by worldstarcountry because: (no reason given)



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