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A Magnetic Field Question Re Gauss Level of 4.7

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posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 07:52 AM
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I still can't help but wonder if the high reading point being so localized on the left side lip of the bench could be residual and possibly from a point where the tabletop was lifted by an electromagnet during its construction and plating procedure.

All power was off in the room during my test readings but then again, that doesn't explain the dead spot in reception from the copper coil antenna when placed above the hot spot so to speak. Unless of course it's being affected by the radiating magnetism from that point.

I've just this second placed a needle onto the hotspot and as expected it sticks.

So is this probably just residual magnetism caused either by the construction process or possibly the use of field generating tools such as a battery charger or electromagnetic generating device of motor that could have been left on the bench at some point in the past?

Rather like how one would magnetise a nail using a magnet?




posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 07:53 AM
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originally posted by: studio500
a reply to: intrptr

That's a battery charger for a power drill.

I did think if that would have any connection but it has never sat on the area of the bench where the high readings are plus when I scanned the charger the readings were low.


Induction of EMF signals , concentrating and focusing in metal structures, depends on the metal structure, source of emf , etc.

You can try setting your meter on the the signal, then unplugging the charger , lifting the charger off the table, moving the table, all while watching the meter.

Grounding the table. I see the table legs insulated with plastic, sitting on a wooden floor?



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: studio500

The table itself is acting like an antenna. You have a meter, isolate the source.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 07:55 AM
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originally posted by: Justoneman
I suppose it is possible that the energy is channeled by the table and you are measuring the energy release point of the metal?


That's a thought. I think this rules out the use of my table though for radio frequency testing.




posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 08:01 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: studio500
a reply to: intrptr

That's a battery charger for a power drill.

I did think if that would have any connection but it has never sat on the area of the bench where the high readings are plus when I scanned the charger the readings were low.


Induction of EMF signals , concentrating and focusing in metal structures, depends on the metal structure, source of emf , etc.

You can try setting your meter on the the signal, then unplugging the charger , lifting the charger off the table, moving the table, all while watching the meter.

Grounding the table. I see the table legs insulated with plastic, sitting on a wooden floor?



Yes that's right, the legs are insulated via rubber/plastic feet with no grounding.

I am just wondering, once the faraday cage is constructed and placed on the bench atop a layer of non conductive insulation, would the magnetic field being so localized effect my radio experiments or would it be more prudent to simply replace the desk with a timber one?



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
a reply to: Arbitrageur

I misunderstood Gauss vs. Tesla.

Sorry, OP, your Gaussmeter might check out ok.
No problem at all my friend



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: Justoneman

The edge profile of the table is typically where any high voltage jump occurs.
Plastic feet on the bottom of the table prevent grounding.
The table could be acting as a capacitor that discharges static electricity and over time magnetizes near the discharge area.

edit on 16-1-2018 by Cauliflower because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 08:17 AM
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I obviously have much to learn my friends.

I've just started conducting a few experiments in the rather controversial area known as Instrumental Transcommunication after being inspired by the work of Konstantine Raudive, Marcello Bacci and the later Scole and Norfolk experiments.




So far I have conducted my experiments in another room but as I purchase more equipment, the wife has intimated that she doesn't like the room being filled with gadgetry etc which I can understand.

I then began to search for a more suitable location within the property as I can imagine my test equipment will grow quite considerably.

This is an area of much controversy and I may well be wasting my time but if I don't delve, I will never know.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

Agreed, I think I will also do some further test later today if possible by moving the table, checking the wall, grounding the table etc.

I'm just way behind in my end of year tax return and must return to this task today as I keep getting sidetracked with ATS and other topics that interests me lol.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
a reply to: ManFromEurope

If you build a metal enclosure called a faraday cage, it will actually block radio signals from entering the enclosure.




NO it will NOT



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: studio500

Inside a faraday cage signals are isolated from external radiation. Ground the table, remove all other influences, you can even use anti static mats with a ground strap like they do in Electronic Manuf. assembly and test.

Oh, and use Kling-free sheets in your dryer.


anti stat



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: FawnyKate

originally posted by: Arbitrageur
a reply to: ManFromEurope

If you build a metal enclosure called a faraday cage, it will actually block radio signals from entering the enclosure.




NO it will NOT

Yes It Will. Metal enclosures is how they prevent EMP from nukes damaging circuitry. Although, a neighbor ham radio enthusiast might induce signals when keying up, or if one lives beneath hi voltage transmission towers...

Monitoring the EM environment during experiments will help determine interference from external sources.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 12:03 PM
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I have a thread related to this. Used the same program. One person said their pillow gave of high reads.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 12:48 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: studio500

Inside a faraday cage signals are isolated from external radiation. Ground the table, remove all other influences, you can even use anti static mats with a ground strap like they do in Electronic Manuf. assembly and test.

Oh, and use Kling-free sheets in your dryer.


anti stat


You are sooo wrong

a car is a faraday cage, how can i use a hand held radio in the car is sgnals can not enter a faraday cage?

you are writing some utter #e in this thread , i pity enyone who believes you.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: FawnyKate

The car body is not a faraday cage, there are breaks in the 'cage' called windows.



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 07:26 PM
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I don't want to get into any kind of argument as everyone has been so helpful but I did find this little snippet regarding the experiments that I want to emulate.


So, evidently, David Ellis conducted experiments with Konstantin Raudive, inside a Faraday Cage, which blanks-out the radio field around a recording apparatus.


Source



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 10:29 PM
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A common misconception is that a Faraday cage provides full blockage or attenuation; this is not true. The reception or transmission of radio waves, a form of electromagnetic radiation, to or from an antenna within a Faraday cage is heavily attenuated or blocked by the cage, however, a Faraday cage has varied attenuation depending on wave form, frequency or distance from receiver/transmitter, and receiver/transmitter power. Near-field high-powered frequency transmissions like HF RFID are more likely to penetrate. Solid cages generally provide better attenuation than mesh cages.


Source en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 16 2018 @ 10:56 PM
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originally posted by: FawnyKate
Source en.wikipedia.org...
Just because it doesn't go to zero doesn't mean it's not being blocked. If it's 99.9% blocked it's still being 99.9% blocked. But yes maybe some small percentage gets through like 0.1% or some other amount depending on the cage, frequency, etc.

The microwave oven works the same way but it blocks the microwave energy from getting out, well most of it. Same thing applies there too, a tiny bit leaks out, but it has to be below a certain amount to meet safety regulations. So yes there's small leakage but not much, and the blocking is effective enough for most practical purposes, like EMP protection, anti-snooping protection, and even microwave safety.

By the way the first sentence of your source says this:


A Faraday cage or Faraday shield is an enclosure used to block electromagnetic fields.


So if you're trying to use that source to say a faraday cage doesn't block EM fields, it doesn't support your point. It does however provide some clarification on the details such as leakage which there's no reason to disagree with. Yes your microwave oven leaks microwaves but not enough to worry about, and that's good because microwaves are known to cause cataracts if you get too much exposure.


edit on 2018116 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jan, 17 2018 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Who mentioned 99.9%

Don't cloud the issue.

I'm not saying a faraday cage doesnt work I was saying wtf does this mean in relation to a metal workbench thats probably had magnets stuck to it at some point.?

" Inside a faraday cage signals are isolated from external radiation"

You cant reason with stupid and this forum is full of it.

Little knowledge is worse than no knowledge at all.

So wtf is he talking about ? building a radio or something?



posted on Jan, 19 2018 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: FawnyKate
If you're more interested in berating people than in learning I don't have much interest in discussion with you, but if you really want to know I'll explain.

The reason a faraday cage can block 99.9% or whatever of the radio waves is that the electrons in the metal are moved by the radio waves in such a fashion that they cancel out the incoming EM radiation, so that's why most of it is blocked.

So now take a metal table. It's no longer a faraday cage but being made of metal, the exact same phenomena of radio waves moving around the electrons in the metal is still happening, but since it's not a complete enclosure you can't get anything like 99.9% blockage, but you can get what are called "Dead zones".

www.techwalla.com...

An area behind a large piece of metal is called a "dead zone." Those locations do not receive any signal, because they are in the shadow of a metal object.


You can also get radio wave reflection and if you have enough it's called "Multi-path".

www.electronics-notes.com...

Radio wave reflection

When a radio wave or in fact any electromagnetic wave encounters a change in medium, some or all of it may propagate into the new medium and the remainder is reflected. The part that enters the new medium is called the transmitted wave and the other the reflected wave.

The rules that govern the reflection of radio waves are simple and are the same as those that govern light waves....

In real transmission paths, radio waves are often reflected by a variety of different surfaces. Although ionospheric reflections are actually caused by refraction, they can often be considered as reflections. Also for shorter range signals like mobile phone or other VHF / UHF communications the signals undergo many reflections.

These multiple reflections lead to the signal arriving at the receiver via several paths. Radio wave reflections normally give rise to multi-path effects.

The multiple reflections and multi-path effects give rise to distortion of the signal and fading.
So if you're adding reflections then as this explains it can add to distortion of the signal and presumably if doing radio experiments one might want to avoid distortion, unless one is specifically trying to measure certain types of distortion.

The OP tried to give some hints about what he's doing but you'll have to ask him if you want further clarification about that.



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