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For 37 mins. . . people in Hawaii were left to believe that a missile was headed their way. Why?

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posted on Jan, 24 2018 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: Bicent

Wall of text is difficult to read. Paragraphs are your friends.




posted on Jan, 25 2018 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

according to Jimstone, the missle was in fact launched but it was shot down by the white hats (whoever they are)

It seems people that were a 100 mile apart saw flashes.

Apparently, as jimstone reports, it toook 30+ minutes to nutralise the threat which meant that not only did they shoot down the missle but they also took out the Dolphin 2 missle that launched it.

If what jimstone says is true, it seems one the US's best frinds is now short of one submarine.

According to stone, the reason for the lauch was to blame NK and force Trump to hit back.



posted on Feb, 2 2018 @ 03:32 AM
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So, now it was an error not an accident, as the employee believed it to be a real emergency.




The Hawaii emergency management services worker who sent a false alert warning of an incoming ballistic missile this month had a long history of poor performance and sent the warning because he thought the state faced an actual threat, officials said on Tuesday. The mistake, which touched off panic and confusion across Hawaii on Jan. 13, occurred when the worker misinterpreted testing instructions from a supervisor, according to the Federal Communications Commission and state officials in Hawaii. Believing the instructions were for a real emergency, the worker, who has not been identified, sent the live alert to the cellphones of all Hawaii residents and visitors to the state. State officials had previously described the episode as an accident.

Shortly after it happened, Gov. David Ige blamed the false warning on a state employee who had “pressed the wrong button.” The Federal Communications Commission and Hawaiian officials have both been investigating the event. The commission investigation, which is continuing, revealed a series of missteps that led to the false alert, including major gaps in Hawaii’s protocol for handling public safety alerts.




www.nytimes.com...



posted on Feb, 2 2018 @ 04:34 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Not an error but intentional. The guy who triggered the alert apparently has a history of doing stuff like this.

He has since been terminated and a new procedure, which requires 2 people to confirm the info before sounding the alarm, has been put into place.



posted on Feb, 2 2018 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: InTheLight

Not an error but intentional. The guy who triggered the alert apparently has a history of doing stuff like this.

He has since been terminated and a new procedure, which requires 2 people to confirm the info before sounding the alarm, has been put into place.


I just saw this blurb on the news, that the employee is now suing the state for defamation.

khon2.com...



posted on Feb, 3 2018 @ 05:56 AM
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Has anyone seen this so-called button?

Is it a big red button? Or a tiny, near-invisible pimple?

Now that we have another button, nobody would ever dare attack us!



posted on Feb, 3 2018 @ 07:06 AM
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a reply to: turbonium1

It’s a windows-esque point and click interface.

No big red button.



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