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Bad News, Everybody: Hydrogen Peroxide Is Useless

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posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 11:22 AM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
Just another article about long held beliefs about certain medicines that do not work as we were told.


But after centuries of blindly trusting the stuff, scientists have found that hydrogen peroxide doesn't prevent bacterial growth or reduce the risk of infection at incision sites. In fact, it may actually slow the healing process.

www.cracked.com...


I used to use it for wounds until I learned this. I've also heard the fizzing itself damages the tissue further along the edges of the wound slowing the healing time.

I usually just wash cuts out with water now and a bit of alcohol before covering it. I find my cuts heal pretty quickly like that.




posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: 727Sky

It fixes my ear infections

Same here.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 12:23 PM
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Nothing works better to remove blood from clothes, flooring, etc.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 01:13 PM
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Well, it does work and it stimulates healing in various ways. Here are a couple of articles on how it works.

www.sciencedaily.com...

www.sciencedaily.com...

Actually, that research must have been funded by antibiotic manufacturers. While hydrogen peroxide stimulates tissue repair, antibiotics use topically usually slow repair. By slowing repair, there would be less chance of a scar, but more chance of infection by antibiotic resistant microbes.

Hydrogen peroxide will disintegrate the cell lining to expose a stem cell to start regeneration, bacteria do not have a stem cell so it just kind of kills some of them. Hydrogen peroxide actually stimulates our immune system to fight, it can't be used to clean the counters, bleach or Ammonia are better for that.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky




Bad News, Everybody: Hydrogen Peroxide Is Useless


Blondie wouldn't agree..



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky


I've gargled with it while in the shower every day, for 15 years. No colds, flu, etc.. since 2004. Probably just coincidence.

But I get a lot of compliments on how White my teeth are. Smart toothpaste manufacturers add a little Hydrogen Peroxide to their mixture, and charge 300% more for the "extreme whitening" effect.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Pouring it over a painful, inflamed ingrown nail brings swift relief...my family will attest to that. Maybe the fact that it softens the inflamed tissue is part of it though.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: 727Sky

1. Cracked isn't a valid source for anything except leftist shills.

2. H2O2 may or may not prevent bacterial infections, I don't care enough to look into it. But what it is useful for is making explosives.


Cracked is as credible as snoops. H2O2 is used to effervesce the wound, remove foreign bodies. It was never antimicrobial.
Isopropyl alcohol when dries, leaves a film that can grow bacteria beneath it. If your not allergic to this, just wash the wound with Dawn anti-bacterial soap (Triclosan), rinse with water and then use Bactine (active ingredients benzalkonium chloride et lidocaine) or it's generic to irrigate it. Cover it with a sterile dressing or band-aid. Never use H2O2 more than once on a wound (there are rare exceptions).



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

USELESS??? Well, admittedly I never used H202 for topical treatments. I am likely one of the few that will drink it though... food grade 35% H2O2 for internal oxidation purposes. I am typically one to treat myself as opposed to trusting a medical community's practices and thoughts of such matters.

I haven't even watched this whole video, but I feel its severely premature to label H2O2 as useless because the way its commonly used may or may not yield results not initially intended for. There's way more uses for H2O2 than cuts, and its not wise to throw it away for whatever other reasons it may help lives.

Take Vick's vapor rub for instance. The label says to put in on chest when congested. It doesn't work as well on the chest as it does slabbed on real thick on the bottom of both feet while sleeping. Put some socks on over the Vick's and you will wake up with no cough... almost guaranteed. Put it on the chest, and you won't feel much difference. Now how stupid would it be to throw all the Vick's Vapor rub away because the makers aren't listing its uses and benefits properly?

Go ahead, dish it out... I'm used to it. I know... I am crazy for drinking H2O2 without trusting Dr. Bullshatte. I just prefer the learning for myself route, and will NEVER ask a doctor what is right for me... that's all. For topical treatments, I trust muzzleflsh's advice and will use raw honey only as it is sound advice.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: Bluesma
I always thought we use hydrogen peroxide on wounds only if they have dirt in them, because the fizzing action can lift the particles up and out. Then you use antiseptic.


That's what we do with minor scrapes and things with crap in them. Clean with water to get what we can out, hit it with peroxide to clean really good, then a good smear and antibiotic ointment. If it can be done, leave it open to air. If it's going to see more use and abuse, cover with a bandage.

I also use tiny, concentrated bursts to help wither away insightly algae in the aquarium, but you have to be very, very careful with it.
edit on 13-1-2018 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 03:11 PM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
Just another article about long held beliefs about certain medicines that do not work as we were told.


But after centuries of blindly trusting the stuff, scientists have found that hydrogen peroxide doesn't prevent bacterial growth or reduce the risk of infection at incision sites. In fact, it may actually slow the healing process.

www.cracked.com...



Noooooo! The ending in the movie 'Evolution' is ruined forever for me now.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 03:15 PM
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interesting. If I get cut and it stops bleeding. I usually just let it go. If it's a bad cut or in a painful place I'll put neosporine on it under bandaid and that does heal it faster than without. If I let it go and it looks infected I do usually pour hydrogen peroxide on it and it does appear to stop infection and heal faster? but then again I also usually use neosporin on it after that as well.

Maybe it's all in my head.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash

Honey turns to hydrogen peroxide on contact with air and water.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 04:11 PM
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Hello?

CRACKED DOT COM!

IT'S A WEBSITE THAT DOES PARODY LIKE MAD MAGAZINE OR THE ONION.

Oh, ffs...



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen
Hydrogen peroxide is only meant to clean the wound initially...it was never supposed to be used for prolonged wound treatment. It is very drying to the skin and can cause irritation by actually sloughing away while cells, collagen and elastin, and keeping them from doing their job to heal the injury.

It's just like anything else though...people think it's a catchall fix for infection prevention, just like neosporin or bacitracin. Just put some in the wound, cover it with a bandage and you're good to go. Problem is, covering and forgetting is the very easiest way to create a friendly environment for opportunistic anaerobic bacteria, which are typically the worst bugs out there.

People don't know how to properly clean and dress wounds anymore. Quick fixes are awesome and convenient, but the body is designed to heal itself. Keeping a wound clean and dry, replacing bandages frequently is typically all that is needed for minor cuts and abrasions in an otherwise healthy individual. The immune system does all the rest.


We should just... hang out.


edit on 13-1-2018 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: sligtlyskeptical
Nothing works better to remove blood from clothes, flooring, etc.



A frequent problem, is it? lol

I believe in HP. Haven't had any around for years, I'll see if I can get some today.






posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 07:58 PM
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I will tell you from a practice standpoint we do not use hydrogen peroxide in the hospital at all. I don't think we even stock it. It stands to reason that if its killing of bacteria via contact it will have a detrimental effect on the bodies cells as well



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Oh well! Guess it's back to using mercury!



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 08:09 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: 727Sky

It fixes my ear infections





So will apple cider vinegar, works great on cuts too.



posted on Jan, 13 2018 @ 09:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: 727Sky
Just another article about long held beliefs about certain medicines that do not work as we were told.


But after centuries of blindly trusting the stuff, scientists have found that hydrogen peroxide doesn't prevent bacterial growth or reduce the risk of infection at incision sites. In fact, it may actually slow the healing process.

www.cracked.com...


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'Centuries' is funny because it was first discovered around 1818.

Ergo, it hasn't been commonly used for centuries.



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