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Sometimes Whole Civilizations Just Vanish

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posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: Hecate666

Again IF science were 'done properly' you would be correct...


The science establishment is like the medical model – sterilized white suits with unchallengeable answers sent down to us from sacred Mount Know-It-All. Until they’re disproven. Time and again. Unfortunately, much of the scientific community is blackmailed into towing the party line or they’ll lose their research grants or places in the scientific hierarchy or University system.

Still, I have no respect for anyone who cows to that, for whatever reason. It’s because people won’t stand up that humanity is becoming a full-on slave race. These NWO pushers are everywhere. And they love the cloak of their bastardized “science” to supposedly validate their programs.

www.zengardner.com...




posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell
Clovis people have been thought to have disappeared due to a extreme solar flare event or even a distant supernova that caused intense bombarbment of the North American continent. It would have damaged the DNA of every mammal and even the North polar ice sheets. It was thought to have taken the Earth out of the ice age.

Do you mean climate change, global warming? Interesting.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: SkeptiSchism

well would you tell the folks back home you were beaten by peeps who were only 5ft tall?



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 04:44 PM
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Village of the Dead: The Anjikuni Mystery



The trout and pike filled estuary known as Anjikuni Lake (also spelled Angikuni) is located along the Kazan River in the remote Kivalliq Region of Nunavut, Canada. The out-of-the-way area is rich with legends of malicious wood spirits and beasts like the Wendigo, but as fascinating as these oft told tales are, there is none more intriguing than the terrifying and controversial mystery surrounding the collective vanishing of the villagers who once lived on the stony coast of Anjikuni’s frigid waters. Our tale begins on an arctic evening back in November of 1930. A Canadian fur trapper by the name of Joe Labelle was seeking respite from the bitter cold and a warm place to bunk down for the night when he tromped into an Inuit village that was nestled on the rocky shores of Canada’s Lake Anjikuni. Labelle had visited the area before and knew it to be a bustling fishing village full of tents, rough hewn huts and friendly locals, but when he shouted a greeting the only sound that returned to him was that of his own echo and his snowshoes crunching through the icy frost. Labelle tensed. He had the instincts of a seasoned outdoorsman and he could sense that something was seriously amiss. Labelle could see the ramshackle structures that were silhouetted under the full moon, but he saw no bustling people nor barking sled dogs nor any other signs of life. Even within the huts, the expected sounds of laughter and conversation were replaced by a deathly silence. Labelle also noted with a chill that not a single chimney had smoke coming out of it. That was when he spied a fire crackling in the distance. Labelle, trying his best to remain calm, picked up his pace and headed toward the glowing embers of the dying fire in the distance, eager to find some trace of humanity. When the trapper arrived at the flames he was greeted not by a friendly face, but a charred stew that had bafflingly been left to blacken above the embers. The veteran tracker — having spent so much of his life skulking around shadowy and inaccessible forests — was likely not easily spooked, but it’s difficult to imagine that he was not bathed in a cold sweat as he walked past the derelict, wave battered kayaks into the heart of the ghost village, wondering what had happened to its inhabitants. Labelle methodically pulled back the caribou skin flaps and checked all of the shacks hoping to find telltale signs of a mass exodus, but, much to his chagrin, he discovered that all of the huts were stocked with the kinds of foodstuff and weapons that would never have been abandoned by their owners. In one shelter he found a pot of stewed caribou that had grown moldy and a child’s half-mended sealskin coat that lay discarded on a bunk with a bone needle still embedded in it as if someone had deserted their effort in mid-stitch. He even inspected the fish storehouse and noticed that its supplies had not been depleted. Nowhere were there any signs of a struggle or pandemonium and Labelle knew all too well that deserting a perfectly habitable community without rifles, food or parkas would be utterly unthinkable, no matter what the circumstances might have been to force the tribe to spontaneously migrate. Labelle then scanned the borders of the village in the hopes of ascertaining what direction the Inuits travelled in. Even though the villagers’ exit seemed to have been relatively recent, and hasty enough to leave food on the flames, he could find no trace of their flight no matter how hard he searched. Cold and fatigued as he was, Labelle was simply too terrified to linger in this enigmatically vacant village. Although it meant he had to forgo the comforts of food, warmth and shelter, the trapper considered the risk of remaining to be too great and decided to make haste through the sub-zero temperatures to a telegraph office located many miles away, lest the same nefarious — and, in Labelle‘s estimation, unmistakably supernatural — force that claimed the villagers descend upon him. MOUNTIES RIDE OUT! The exhausted and frostbit Labelle finally staggered into the telegraph office and within minutes an emergency message was fired off to the closest Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) barracks. By the time the Mounties arrived, several hours later, Labelle had calmed himself enough to relate his disturbing tale. According to 1984’s “The World’s Greatest UFO Mysteries” by Roger Boar and Nigel Blundell, on their way to Anjikuni Lake the Mounties stopped for a bit of rest at a shanty that was shared by trapper Armand Laurent and his two sons. The officers explained to their hosts that they were headed to Anjikuni to deal with: “a kind of problem.” The Mounties inquired as to whether or not the Laurents had seen anything unusual during the past few days, and the trapper was forced to concede that he and his sons has spied a bizarre gleaming object soaring across the sky just a few days before. Laurent claimed that the enormous, illuminated flying “thing” seemed to changed shape before their very eyes, transforming from a cylinder into a bullet-like object. He further divulged that this unusual object was flying in the direction of the village at Anjikuni.



For more of the story mysteriousuniverse.org... ikuni-mystery/
edit on 1/11/2018 by Gargoyle91 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Hecate666

murgatroid is right generally if scientist say something is true the masses take it as the gospel

don't believe ok
scientist said tobacco was good for health later proven wrong
scientist said coc aine was safe and it was used in health drinks its was even used in orginal version of coca-cola
scientist said by 2020 much of east coast would be underwater by 2020 and people still believe that.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 05:34 PM
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Did anyone else look at the Pictish stone carvings, and instantly think of “stargate”.There are a couple there that at a stretch look as they though that’s the idea are trying to convey.
edit on 11-1-2018 by penfold because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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Nice thread!

The Anasazi, Olmecs and the Megalithic builders around the world.

What the hell was going on back then and why did they vanish. Just died out? Wiped out? Conquered? Went home?

Science has it's time line on human history but it just doesn't make a lot of sense sometimes.





posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 06:44 PM
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originally posted by: FauxMulder
a reply to: Painterz

I would say the Picts are the least mysterious of the ones I listed (though there is SOME mystery about them) but I wanted to include them because they are one of the coolest. Romans couldn't even F with them.



That is very true, yes. The Picts are fascinating. Because they left so many tantalising hints and clues, but very little definite.

And as you say, there's a certain pride hereabouts that the Romans came, they saw, and they decided it was altogether far too much hassle and went back to their forts.


They must have been masters of the hit and run. And without major settlements to attack, very difficult to defeat in battle.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: Hecate666
a reply to: Murgatroid

I mentioned that science 'done properly' and by proper scientists. That excludes all of your examples and still keeps my post true.



Indeed, yes. Science is not set in stone. It's a methodology that provides a constantly evolving understanding.

The science of archaeology changes our understanding of ancient events all the time, as new discoveries are made, new techniques uncovered.

Constantly evolving. I graduated with a masters in archaeology 20 years ago, and it's changed so much since then.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Perhaps "Climate Change"? i know it is "not politically correct" to say that "Climate Change has happened in the past", but we do know that several ancient people had to migrate to new areas because of dramatic climate changes have occurred in the past.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

With Trump in office, the global civilization is likely to vanish.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: richapau

For those who have NOT been comatose for the last several years...




posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

One of the few threads I have read all the way through. Good info even for one not well versed but still fascinated with ancient civilizations. Was intrigued with t1he Picts as I heard the mention of them but only knew they were from British Isles. Now see they were from North Eastern Scotland. One of my Scot lines is from NE Scotland and came to America 1733.

Just more reason to research.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder


I was looking at a video the other day of the distribution of standing stones in Britain, one can see that all the remaining ones are on high ground. With none on the lower Eastern side, it occurred that when Dogerland went under, its entirely feasible that most of the British Isles on the lower Eastern side could have been inundated, Which could date the stones at a greater age than previously thought. That is the sea level went up and swallowed a lot of land, then receded a bit until what you have left today where the inundated places have no standing stones.



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 09:21 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

Very cool. Share the link if you can, I'd like to watch it.




posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder


24 Mins in, it gives a map but its a great vid done by Amateurs



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 09:42 PM
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originally posted by: richapau
a reply to: FauxMulder

With Trump in office, the global civilization is likely to vanish.


Contemplating the mind creating such a petty and absurd post made my eyes cross.

 


Id be interested in the video on the stones too. Doggerland really fascinates me

Eta...i see you added it while i was posting....thanks
edit on 1/11/2018 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 09:52 PM
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originally posted by: Murgatroid
a reply to: Hecate666

If the quote in my sig were in fact untrue, you would be correct.

The fact remains that it IS true, stating a fact and bashing are two entirely different things.

You mentioned "religious folk"...

I view the Scientific community as some of the most fanatically religious people I've ever met.


Which leads me to doubt that you met them.

Harte



posted on Jan, 11 2018 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder
Every dog has his day. You can say the same thing about, civilizations, cultures, peoples, what not, and whatever. Its always an ever shifting current. Some died out, and some merely changed, most as in the great majority simply changed with the times.



posted on Jan, 12 2018 @ 12:07 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

That was a great video. Kinda reminded me of this one. Though this is over 7 hours long, it's well worth it.




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