It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

John Alexander's UFO sighting

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 03:16 PM
link   
The AATIP thread inspired me to go and check out John Alexander's new book, Reality Denied. In it, he discusses his involvement in the Chris Bledsoe case...and to make a long story short: he sees something weird. Then afterwards, the strangeness continues with a Dr. X type healing experience.

imgur.com...

Readers of the AATIP can probably see how this would be relevant re: belief/conversion disorder causing weird events. This would also would explain Bledsoe's involvement with Kit Green's experiencer group. The Crohn's aspect might also be of note given the role the immune system plays there - and that is certainly an area of interest in Kit's research.




posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 04:42 PM
link   
Thought I'd help out some for those maybe not so familiar with the Col.

Col. John B. Alexander, in his professional & personal activities, is very representative of how UFOs, Remote Viewing, EM/ELF, Non-Lethal Weaponry, and PSI have somehow become tied at the hip.

Remote Viewing Pioneer Dr. Hal Puthoff & Dr. Alexander

Long considered an expert on UFOs, phenomenology, and non-lethal weaponry, let's look at some tidbits from his own introduction in his ATS AMA thread My name is John B. Alexander, Ph.D. I’ve researched many controversial topics. Ask me anything:


For 32 years I served in the Army entering as a private, rising to sergeant first class (E7), attending Officers Candidate School, was commissioned as a second lieutenant and became a colonel before I retired in 1988. My varied assignments were mostly in special operations, intelligence, and research and development. I am a Special Forces combat commander, Ranger, Pathfinder, underwater operations qualified, and later served under contract as a mentor to the senior MOD leadership in Afghanistan…

…I have had four books published and written many scientific articles on a broad range of topics from non-lethal weapons and geopolitics, to remote viewing, near death experiences and UFOs. As a senior fellow at defense universities I have published monographs on the changing nature of war, intelligence shortfalls in Central and South America, emerging conflicts in Africa, and the convergence of functions between special operations forces and civilian law enforcement agencies…

…My book, UFOs: Myths, Conspiracies, and Realities, is based on an ad hoc group I formed decades ago to study the topic. Participants came from all services, several intelligence agencies, and aerospace industries.


So, there we have it in his own words: Military Intelligence, Non-Lethal Weaponry, Remote Viewing, and UFOs. The Colonel is definitely an impressive man. Let's see if we can take those vitae details--and other information--and collate them into a narrative that can answer some of the burning questions that most of us here have about our world, our futures, and the mysteries therein. First a bit more about the Colonel:


"Last year, Alexander organized a national conference devoted to researching 'reports of ritual abuse, near-death experiences, human contacts with extraterrestrial aliens and other so-called anomalous experiences,' ...

... He was an official representative for the Silva mind control organization and a lecturer on precataclysmic civilizations ... [and] he helped perform ESP experiments with dolphins.'" (Aftergood, Steven, "The Soft-Kill Fallacy", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 9-10/1994, v50, n5, p40)

www.bibliotecapleyades.net...

And did we mention he taught neuro-linguistic programmingen.wikipedia.org... (NLP) to Al Gore?

With such a broad base of experience, official access, and expertise, it's probably no surprise that Col. Alexander has gone on record both here in his AMA thread and in his newest book with a UFO philosophy that closely resembles the Interdimensional Hypothesis put forth by his good and longtime friend and associate Dr. Jacques Vallee.

Jacques Vallee also, it should be noted, wrote the forward for the Colonel's book UFOs: Myths, Conspiracies, and Realities.

In addition to the subject of non-lethal weapons and UFOs, the Colonel also holds an appreciation and interest in electromagnetically derived anti-gravity and PSI anomalies as evidenced in his support of John Hutchison in the Fortean Times article/interview titled Paranormal Soldier by Jim Schnabel.

No matter what any of us might personally feel about Hutchison and his "Hutchison Effect," it's Colonel Alexander's perception that is germane to the topic as noted here:


JS: One of the less well-known phenomena you looked into, in those days, was the so-called Hutchison Effect [see FT92:25], in which a Canad­ian inventor, John Hutchison, claimed to be able to create some kind of previously undescribed force that could levitate objects, among other things.



JA: George Hathaway, a Canadian electrical engineer, came down to Washington with a friend of Hutchison’s named Alex Pezarro, and showed us an 8-millimeter film they had made of Hutchison’s phenomena.

And on this tape there wasn’t just one thing going on that on its own might have been explained easily – there were a host of things going on. For instance, there was a rat-tail file, held between two wooden boards, that lit up like an incandescent light and actually burned, although according to Hathaway and Pezarro it didn’t burn the wooden boards.

And they said that as soon as the power went off, the file was cold. There also were things that apparently levitated. There were pieces of case-hardened steel that went soft as lead at one end. And Hathaway and Pezarro said that they were witnesses to many events.

We said, okay, can you replicate it? 

And we paid them to work with Hutchison to do that, and at a certain point we sent a couple of guys up there from Los Alamos [National Laboratory] and some others from INSCOM.

I arrived a day early, and they said, wow, we just had levitation, and we just turned the system off, haven’t touched a thing. So the idea was that the next day we’d turn it back on when the scientists came. Well, the scientists came and they turned it back on and absolutely nothing happened. Except that the power supply caught fire. They took a day to get a new one in, and turned it on and we watched – and again, nothing happened.



JS: You never knew what to make of it?



JA: I think events happened, but I can’t explain them. My key question to Hutchison was: “Are you part of the system?” Because I suspected that these were poltergeist-type phenomena.



One of the usual factors in poltergeist phenomena is emotionally disturbed people. And when I knew him, Hutchison was on methadone.



By the way, all this had started because he liked to sit in the dark and watch sparks. So he had set up Van de Graaf generators and Tesla coils and Jacob’s Ladders and stuff like that. He said that the effects he initially came up with were accidental. 

And when I asked him whether he was part of the system, he said, “Yes.” So I really wondered if what we had was a guy doing poltergeist phenomena in a lab. At the time at INSCOM I already had been looking into psychokinesis.

Paranormal Soldier: John Alexanderwww.forteantimes.com...



edit on 9-1-2018 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 05:14 PM
link   
a reply to: The GUT

Appreciate the help GUT.



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 06:33 PM
link   
So it appears that what we have with Col. John B. Alexander is A Man of Faith. And he seems to have long association with other disciples of great faith. Of the Woo variety. When we talk about "religious beliefs," I reckon Alexander's own beliefs would qualify as such?

Nothing wrong with that, but some of these characters seem to have ZERO filters when it comes to phenomenology/ufology. Wide-eyed and ready to believe.

The Colonel seems to derive a lot of information from something as simple as his wife's feet getting twitchy and the claim of "energies" being present. I have seen these "energies" run pretty rampant through a crowd at an Earth Day camping event, but it was hard to ultimately say if it was the power of suggestion and belief or from something we tend to categorize under the heading, "Paranormal."

Of course he had a 2-second "sighting" along with the rest of the experience so who knows.

How far along in the book are you 1o9? Thank you for sharing, Brother!



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 06:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: The GUT
So it appears that what we have with Col. John B. Alexander is A Man of Faith. And he seems to have long association with other disciples of great faith. Of the Woo variety. When we talk about "religious beliefs," I reckon Alexander's own beliefs would qualify as such?

Nothing wrong with that, but some of these characters seem to have ZERO filters when it comes to phenomenology/ufology. Wide-eyed and ready to believe.

The Colonel seems to derive a lot of information from something as simple as his wife's feet getting twitchy and the claim of "energies" being present. I have seen these "energies" run pretty rampant through a crowd at an Earth Day camping event, but it was hard to ultimately say if it was the power of suggestion and belief or from something we tend to categorize under the heading, "Paranormal."

Of course he had a 2-second "sighting" along with the rest of the experience so who knows.

How far along in the book are you 1o9? Thank you for sharing, Brother!






Near the end. I should have brought up the dolphin communication, the crystal skull stuff (Dan Aykroyd can do the film adaptation), spoonbending/firewalking,and apparently used to travel with a copy of the Catholic Rite of Exorcism... I think it's safe to say he has uh, broad interests.

(Also ayahuasca.)



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 06:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: 1ofthe9

originally posted by: The GUT

(Also ayahuasca.)


Seriously?

I know its a no-no to discuss these types of no-nos, but if so...where do you read or hear about his involvement with ayahuasca? (technically its legal for religious use by members of 2 churches in my state of Oregon, so not sure why discussion of this topic is a no-no)



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 07:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harpua

originally posted by: 1ofthe9

originally posted by: The GUT

(Also ayahuasca.)


Seriously?

I know its a no-no to discuss these types of no-nos, but if so...where do you read or hear about his involvement with ayahuasca? (technically its legal for religious use by members of 2 churches in my state of Oregon, so not sure why discussion of this topic is a no-no)


It's in the book. He goes to Brazil for it.
edit on 12018f3107America/Chicago9 by 1ofthe9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 07:19 PM
link   
a reply to: 1ofthe9

Interesting. I need to check out his statements about it.



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 07:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harpua
a reply to: 1ofthe9

Interesting. I need to check out his statements about it.


I'll see about digging it up after dinner.



posted on Jan, 9 2018 @ 10:10 PM
link   
Good post my friend!

If I recall correctly, when Col Alexander visited some shamans, he was vastly impressed that the shaman
could "materialize'/"dematerialize some small pebbles. While that would be impressive, one would think
that "palming" or other stage magician tricks would be an equally good explanation.

I think the Colonel's "filter" as Gut would say, is not set very high at all.



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 12:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: Kevin2024
Good post my friend!

If I recall correctly, when Col Alexander visited some shamans, he was vastly impressed that the shaman
could "materialize'/"dematerialize some small pebbles. While that would be impressive, one would think
that "palming" or other stage magician tricks would be an equally good explanation.

I think the Colonel's "filter" as Gut would say, is not set very high at all.



Thats my impression too. He argues firewalking shows PK effects, and the crystal skull thing involves a medium and its just weird. Also plant telepathy shows up for the first time in years.

Here's the ayahuasca bit. Dances around personal use, but I'll note he's had a relationship with this fellow in the jungle for several years.

edit on 12018f3112America/Chicago9 by 1ofthe9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 12:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: 1ofthe9

originally posted by: Kevin2024
Good post my friend!

If I recall correctly, when Col Alexander visited some shamans, he was vastly impressed that the shaman
could "materialize'/"dematerialize some small pebbles. While that would be impressive, one would think
that "palming" or other stage magician tricks would be an equally good explanation.

I think the Colonel's "filter" as Gut would say, is not set very high at all.



Thats my impression too. He argues firewalking shows PK effects, and the crystal skull thing involves a medium and its just weird. Also plant telepathy shows up for the first time in years.

Here's the ayahuasca bit. Dances around personal use, but I'll note he's had a relationship with this fellow in the jungle for several years.


As I've said, I have a certain respect for shamanism, especially when it thrives in it's original culture, and serves a cultural purpose.

I also find shamanism highly related to various phenomena we experience in the west.. but it just takes you to the doorway, it doesn't necessarily produce anomalous effects all on it's own.

But once you cause a mental break with reality inside of yourself, it's hard to be objective about whether you are getting real results, or it's just delusion.

Most everyone drinks their own snake oil.. not just shaman.. but they ARE cultural experts at it.

Kev



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 01:28 AM
link   
a reply to: Kevin2024

Which brings us back to both liminality and the trickster!
Not many here, but a good discussion. This might be the place to "flesh" the Colonel out a bit. An interesting man and as with all interesting folk; full of contradictions.



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 01:37 AM
link   
a reply to: The GUT

A lot of people see the trickster as a form of "cosmic control loop".
a lot of people see the tricker and the "PSP
henomenon" as facets of the same thing & part of the control loop.
And since we humans tend to anthoropomorphize things, we tend to attribute human motives and consciousness
to perhaps not-so-conscious processes, such as control loops.

It's hard to say. It's the biggest mind frak of all..

Anyone who thinks they can test the "control loop" or "beat it at it's own game" is quite ambitious!

I would like to mention, that there seem to be much more humble (and understandable control loops).

For example, let's say that originally a letter agency put out some disinfo about subject X.
Gullible citizens embrace it, empower it, and magnify it.. making it come "alive".
Then the citizens unwittingly feed it back to the original letter agency, or to related agencies,
or to other staff of that agency who aren't briefed on the original deception.

So eventually you get Doty, etc, who come to believe as true, what they originally created to
be false.

And maybe in a Marian encounter sort of way, maybe there really IS a teence of 'reality'
tacked onto the original deception now.

what say you mr. GUT?

Kev



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 07:42 AM
link   
a reply to: Kevin2024

Is there a Larsen like effect as well (cf. Audio Feedback)? Does that attribute to the strangeness?

It's sad in your example that when the originator dies without the rest knowing, you can never go back. You never can completely, but it still makes a difference. To me this may as well be disclosure. A confession before it's 'out there'.

Think I'm going to read up on the 'meme machine', interesting stuff. Thanks for the pointer!
edit on 10-1-2018 by zeroPointOneQ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 10:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: zeroPointOneQ
a reply to: Kevin2024

Is there a Larsen like effect as well (cf. Audio Feedback)? Does that attribute to the strangeness?

It's sad in your example that when the originator dies without the rest knowing, you can never go back. You never can completely, but it still makes a difference. To me this may as well be disclosure. A confession before it's 'out there'.

Think I'm going to read up on the 'meme machine', interesting stuff. Thanks for the pointer!


There are many examples of feedback loops in nature and technology. Most people use the thermostat
as an example.

I think that feedback loops which include sentient agents are particularly interesting, as if you can
affect the memes in the brain in one of the actors, you can reprogram the "control loop".

I'm fairly certain that's what a lot of this control loop stuff is about.

Then the remain question is whether all this info (or disinfo) that nudges people to act differently
CAN sometimes produce anomalous effects as well.. (where 2 or more are gathered in my name..)
mass, marian type effects, etc.

Plant false info about "Stay-Puft" in one end, and wind up with a real one on the other.. or not..
that is a question.

On memes, I'm certain that alphabet folks once used her books as as bible, but have now
far surpassed it. It has probabably been DARPA funded for years.

Kev



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 01:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Kevin2024

what say you mr. GUT?

I think you are right that the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing is almost certainly part of the conundrum. There's actually some pretty good support for the argument and some examples where differing intel agencies confused the hell out of each other or stepped all over the other one's project. Doty was front and center in at least one of them that seems to have upset the DIA at the time, although it's hard to make heads or tails of what was really going on with that one.



posted on Jan, 10 2018 @ 01:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: The GUT

originally posted by: Kevin2024

what say you mr. GUT?

I think you are right that the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing is almost certainly part of the conundrum. There's actually some pretty good support for the argument and some examples where differing intel agencies confused the hell out of each other or stepped all over the other one's project. Doty was front and center in at least one of them that seems to have upset the DIA at the time, although it's hard to make heads or tails of what was really going on with that one.


But doesn't Doty SEEM to believe his own lies?
I mean, being a poor liar, i don't know.. but do you think it's possible that some of these people now
believe versions of their own original lies? Or are they such consummate liars that it's impossible
to get a read on that?




top topics



 
7

log in

join