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Biggest Crooks In The World

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posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: TruthxIsxInxThexMist
First of all Money/Cash is something which can be printed forever or in todays Society something which can be digitally printed forever and it should be a prison sentence if you are lending people this cash which comes out of thin air and then asking for said people to repay that loan with interest.


I remember when I was walking past Fifth Third Bank, minding my own business, when a loan agent came out, grabbed me physically, and under threat of great bodily harm, made me sign my mortgage paperwork. It was almost like I didn't have a choice in the matter.




posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
Wait, I thought Trump was supposed to to be the biggest crook of all time?!



Not yet.

But, he's working on it.




posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Yes we did it to ourselves, that's how we are held accountable. Well I mean society in general, obviously there are still 'good' people left and they are stuck in this system. Hopefully they come to an awareness of the truth before it's too late. But when banks ban cash and force everyone to use their electronic currency it will be hard to escape.

That's why I think real money are things you own, in your hand. Not paper claims like stocks, bonds, even digits in a bank account or in an encrypted cloud database. Land with mineral and water rights, tangible things like PMs or even tools. All that carries no counter party risk although even with property you are relying on governments to uphold property rights.

That's a whole other discussion there but it is related to our money evidently
edit on 7-1-2018 by SkeptiSchism because: oopsed



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 10:53 AM
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Another thing is this relentless drive towards centralization and systemization. I think that is related to our desires for convenience, it's more convenient to have things regulated, organized, structured, controlled but obviously the potential for abuse by the controllers are too great for humans to have.

This article here is technical but it's good showing how banks transitioned from local businesses making money by lending capital into the local economy for small businesses to behemoths we have today relying on top down driven policies (from regulators). Obviously small businesses are dying off, you can see that in any published statistics because in general access to credit for them was from small local banks.

www.nakedcapitalism.com...

This also favors large corporations, who have access to credit at below market rates of interest giving them automatic leverage or advantage over everyone else in the economy.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot


The Federal Reserve gets its powers from an act of Congress. Nothing unconstitutional about that.

Except the part where they violate the constitution.

Tell me, according to the constitution, who has exclusive authority to mint coin and regulate, according to that document?
edit on 7-1-2018 by intrptr because: bb code



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:16 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ScepticScot


The Federal Reserve gets its powers from an act of Congress. Nothing unconstitutional about that.

Except the part where they violate the constitution.

Tell me, according to the constitution, who has exclusive authority to mint coin and regulate, according to that document?


And it's done via an act of congress. Do you expect the members of Congress to physically mint all the money in circulation personally?



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:22 AM
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originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ScepticScot


The Federal Reserve gets its powers from an act of Congress. Nothing unconstitutional about that.

Except the part where they violate the constitution.

Tell me, according to the constitution, who has exclusive authority to mint coin and regulate, according to that document?


And it's done via an act of congress. Do you expect the members of Congress to physically mint all the money in circulation personally?


The idea is to not let private banks get hold of (Privatize) the nations money supply, why it was written into the Constitution which also, by the way, the elected representatives are sworn to uphold.

Not to give away the keys to the Kingdom, lol.

Anyone who even remotely understands this aspect of Constitutional law, knows this.

Except you?



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot

An Act of Congress can also have every nuke be launched. Or all of our gold reserves handed over to 'who ever'. Or criminalize cannabis. Militarize the cops. Etc.

But hey Congress did that all so its good sound constitutional policy yipee!



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ScepticScot


The Federal Reserve gets its powers from an act of Congress. Nothing unconstitutional about that.

Except the part where they violate the constitution.

Tell me, according to the constitution, who has exclusive authority to mint coin and regulate, according to that document?


And it's done via an act of congress. Do you expect the members of Congress to physically mint all the money in circulation personally?


The idea is to not let private banks get hold of (Privatize) the nations money supply, why it was written into the Constitution which also, by the way, the elected representatives are sworn to uphold.

Not to give away the keys to the Kingdom, lol.

Anyone who even remotely understands this aspect of Constitutional law, knows this.

Except you?


So you can refer to a Supreme Court decision saying the Federal reserve is unconstitutional?

Just because you think the Constitution means something doesn't make it so.

The money supply in the US has always been predominantly private. Under the federal reserve system it is less so than previously.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: SkeptiSchism

Here's another question:

Whilst the Taxman is taxing us, who is taxing the Taxman?



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot


So you can refer to a Supreme Court decision saying the Federal reserve is unconstitutional?

Whom is the "Federal Reserve" ?
edit on 7-1-2018 by intrptr because: bb code



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Well since a greater authority taxes the lesser I'd have to guess banks.




posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:37 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: ScepticScot

An Act of Congress can also have every nuke be launched. Or all of our gold reserves handed over to 'who ever'. Or criminalize cannabis. Militarize the cops. Etc.

But hey Congress did that all so its good sound constitutional policy yipee!


Congress launched all the nukes??? Crikey I thought I would have noticed that one....



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ScepticScot

[qote]So you can refer to a Supreme Court decision saying the Federal reserve is unconstitutional?

Whom is the "Federal Reserve" ?

The federal reserve is a clearing house of sorts for banks. There are 28 primary dealers who own predominate shares in the federal reserve, although all member banks in the system own shares. Every year the fed dishes out profits to member banks. But, if they earn interest from holding treasury bonds they have to return that interest to the federal government at the end of every year, so a circle jerk of sorts.

The fed doesn't really earn direct profits I mean they hold almost $4 trillion in worthless assets, it's more or less a tool to favor big banks.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ScepticScot


So you can refer to a Supreme Court decision saying the Federal reserve is unconstitutional?

Whom is the "Federal Reserve" ?


Do you really need an explanation of the Federal reserve system? Wikipedia can probably help if so.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot

You'd just get mumbo jumbo nonsense from wiki. The Creature from Jekyll Island describes the historical process of the fed, it's creation. But in general it's just more of the same old collectivization, centralization and sytemetization of our economy and government controlled by a minority if people who profit greatly.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:45 AM
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I've studied the fed for over 10 years and in general I've come to this conclusion: the fed is a hybrid creature between banks and governments. It has the authority of government to craft regulations and regulate member banks, but it enjoys private sector privileges of complete secrecy and opacity.

It's completely unconstitutional and we'd be better off having treasury print state currency interest (debt) free.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot

I'm just showing how this idea that Congress goes does something then it just makes perfect sense is absurd.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: SkeptiSchism
a reply to: ScepticScot

You'd just get mumbo jumbo nonsense from wiki. The Creature from Jekyll Island describes the historical process of the fed, it's creation. But in general it's just more of the same old collectivization, centralization and sytemetization of our economy and government controlled by a minority if people who profit greatly.


The creature from Jekyll island is total nonsense and should not be used as reference by anyone who wants to be taken seriously.



posted on Jan, 7 2018 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: ScepticScot

I'm just showing how this idea that Congress goes does something then it just makes perfect sense is absurd.


No one said that that. I said the Federal Reserve wasn't unconstitutional which it isn't.




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