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Spectre and Meltdown. Accidental backdoor reveal?

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posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:27 AM
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edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:27 AM
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Wow. Looks like you guys have a big page glitch here... And look, it's HACKABLE!!!
edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:33 AM
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originally posted by: TheAiIsLying
a reply to: KARARYU

What the hell has Trump got to do with any of this? I'm talking about an exploit in Intel chips, and possibly ALL chips that everyone on the planet is currently using. This goes back at least 20 years. It's possible that this is a backdoor that was put into these chips by the chip makers at the direction from the alphabet agencies for a very long time. What the hell does this have to do with Trump?


Here's a good link

github.com...

It's got some sample code, plus links to the papers for Spectre and Meltdown. Chip designers have to cross-license patents, so if someone made a boo-boo in their implementation covered by a patent (in this case out-of-order execution and speculative-execution), then the other chip vendors will have made that boo-boo as well.

The fatal assumption was that if they needed to roll-back a series of instructions in a speculative execution branch, that just undoing the state of registers, condition bits, the local stack would be enough. They didn't factor in the state of the CPU cache memory, which while normally invisible to any thread, can be read indirectly by seeing what data had been removed in order to get the new data in.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: KARARYU

Ok, that made more sense than your last post. I get that there is no real privacy. I even get that if anyone want's to get into your privates they can.

The fact is that this is hardwired into all of the processors for the last 20 years means that the alphabet agencies have gotten their way all these years says all.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:44 AM
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originally posted by: neo96
IF the government agencies wanted a back door in processors.

We'd never have found out bout it.

And it is that simple.



Some years back the subject of 'back door' access to computers was discussed even in the mainstream media, numerous times. I say that only because I can remember reading those stories and discussions.

Not sure if it was by way of the processor or some other part of the machine, but it was certainly requested by law enforcement. They were going to "protect us", you know.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:44 AM
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a reply to: KARARYU

Here we go....



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: Salander

LEO uses OS backdoor access.

This is a chipset issue



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:47 AM
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originally posted by: KARARYU
Wow. Looks like you guys have a big page glitch here... And look, it's HACKABLE!!!


loose lips shink ships bud



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying

And "lest ye not forget" that, next time we take a dunk into the Darknet to watch some X³³³ porn or deal over those unspeakable things that only you and I know what they are, using some Tor and VPN, that walkarounds like these are pretty much USELESS. Also deserving mention the fact that "The Powers" rely largely on AI, cognitive computing and humungous data crunch capabilities. We just can't hide, period. Over and out... >SIGH



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: [post=23019186]KARA
So what's your point? Nice blah blah but can you put your insight into a coherent post?



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: KARARYU

30% loss in processing...when i read that my first 2 thoughts:

- thats gonna piss off gamers and people rendering 3d, maybe making their cpu obsolete for the technology being used

- sounds like someone is crowdsourcing processing power for some agregate tasks like a neural net



It shouldn't affect gamers too badly at all. Most of the work is done by GPU processors for gaming.

The big hit will be on people who run big database processes, cloud computing, things like that. The average every day user probably won't notice much of an impact.

Which isn't to excuse it.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying

Judging by the looks of your replies to me, I would dare saying that something, somewhere, somehow tells me that you are either jealous, for some reason, or fascinated about me, in some peculiar, secretive and unspeakable way. Are you gay? That is nothing to be ashamed of, bail it out!

OR

Are you some kind of virtual digital being? Because, the way you keep repeating prefab questions, sounds a lot like my Alexa when it says: "sorry, I’m having trouble understanding you right now..."

Are you sure you are not some agency AI or something? TIP: Perform a human life form check. In time: loved your avatar, which Hogwarts house is it? Maybe a rogue, banned one? How enticing!

Anyway, feel free to keep asking things over, and over, and over... chances are I will not even notice, for I am moving onto other posts. But don't worry, nobody - or nothing - is perfect. Have a holly jolly nice... whatever doesn't baffle your chickpea reasoning and see you around!

:kiss:
edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 09:46 AM
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edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)


IT'S FLAW EXPLOIT SEASON, GUYS! goo.gl...

Aw, okay, flaw exploit season is year-round, I guess.

edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 10:16 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: KARARYU

30% loss in processing...when i read that my first 2 thoughts:

- thats gonna piss off gamers and people rendering 3d, maybe making their cpu obsolete for the technology being used

- sounds like someone is crowdsourcing processing power for some agregate tasks like a neural net


Gaming and 3d rendering is almost unaffected. On other hand video postproduction or large databases are heavily affected. Largest penalty is in IO (reading/writing files and pipes). Typical game or small DB is loaded in RAM, so penalty is much smaller.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying

It makes perfect sense to me.

When I learnt that windows 10 would be the last and they are moving from optical to digital, my spidey sense started tingling. The biggest problem is these backdoors will always be open no matter what the device, as planned obsolescence (planned obsolescence can be achieved by placing resistors near a heat source so the ceramic cracks) means that you will need a new device, but still you will have the same logins and passwords despite the new device.

If I may put my tin foil hat on, Intel or even M$ made a deal with the devil, perhaps a security update is for the national Security Agency, I've never had problems if I don't update because I use exterior antivirus and other third party security apps, I can't speak for Linux users though.

I am probably wrong, but still...
edit on 6-1-2018 by Thecakeisalie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: TheAiIsLying
a reply to: KARARYU

Ok, that made more sense than your last post. I get that there is no real privacy. I even get that if anyone want's to get into your privates they can.

The fact is that this is hardwired into all of the processors for the last 20 years means that the alphabet agencies have gotten their way all these years says all.


Spread of this category of design flaws over almost all CPUs is sign of laziness among developers. Simply some concepts are taken as "granted" by community and nobody is evaluating them again in new context. Such "design flaws" are quite common in science ...



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: [post=23018913]TheAiIsLying

It would be a positive step if these vulnerabilities also help government agencies take down at least the worst parts of the dark internet.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:28 PM
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a reply to: JanAmosComenius

I agree with you on that one. It's not even really laziness on the part of developers but the demand from consumers that cpu's will always be backward compatible. How many years did the BIOS show that there was 640k of memory available?

My non-conspiracy mind looks at this and thinks that there's been a combined contribution between Microsoft and their short term design of DOS and Intel making chips that were compatible with it that probably lead to this. We still drive cars that use pistons, for god's sake!

Oh well, it's still early days. We'll see how this all pans out, or it will go dark and we'll forget it even happened



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:42 PM
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OK i give in

i am a cheap xxxx word

turn everything off then click Feckbook or Nasa live ! AND I AM A IDIOT in the computer world , i still use win black or vista some days but check the CPU usage ???

Why would a company that is GIVING you its product for free be making BILLIONS in PROFIT


The mentality of the human race worries me

Bad M onkey




posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:12 PM
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Check into the Intel Management Engine if your looking for a useful backdoor.



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