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Spectre and Meltdown. Accidental backdoor reveal?

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posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:11 AM
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So by now everyone is aware of the supposed "bug" that is present in all Intel processors from about 20 years up to now. This has blown out to pretty much every processor from ARM to AMD when it goes for Meltdown.

I'm not an IT guy, but I do understand how processors work in a low level kind of way. Been playing around with them since the Commodore 64 days. Modern processors with all the multi core different levels of cache kind of knowledge, not so much. Did some IT study in uni back in the late 90's so I do have some knowledge on how single core processors work when it comes to the fetch/execute cycle but that's about it.

Here's what I want to throw out to the guys that have the know. Is it possible that the guys that accidently unearthed these bugs stumbled upon a backdoor that the alphabet agencies demanded that chip makers put in? It just seems unbelievable that for 20 years chip makers have had this kind of bug present without anyone pointing it out. There is, after all, a lot of spectrum kind of guys in the industry, and at least one of them would have thought of this by now.

Thoughts?




posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:16 AM
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I agree. I just can't imagine that a 'bug' like this has gone unnoticed for more than twenty years. I think what has happened is that it's been left there for reasons none of us understand. Yet.

I just can't imagine how it was missed. There are alot of very smart people who deal with these processors who are very good at their jobs and wouldn't let this type of 'bug' go unnoticed.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:22 AM
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Hackers like myself know of CPU cache flaw exploits for over a quarter of a century now. Then, out of the blue, we're exposed. Whoa. Suddenly, all of my red lights, horns and sirens went off... but not for obvious reasons. Couldn't THE PUBLIC DISCLOSURE of these flaws be a FALSEFLAG? You read it right. Won't THE PATCHES THEMSELVES be SLAVEWARES in disguise that can thrive on the processing power of billions of machines simultaneously, once installed, aiming at, for instance, mining cryptocurrency or, compromising our already almost none online privacy? And, in the sole, fortuitous case they ARE NOT, won't these same issued fixes be vulnerable to some exploit of whatever nature? - I'm already working on that - Enough conspirationism, let's call it a day and just have in mind that 1) the pseudo-whistle blower only made up for a new everyone's need: purchasing soon a new, faster, more secure machine. 2) Thus, evidencing that the most vulnerable part of any system, as cutting-edge as it can be, is our pockets. 3) No, it won't kill us all, it will only ruin our banking balance with everyone having to purchase machines with that "one new, revolutionary, exploit-proof processor" - meaning, with this and other bugs hidden enough to be only exploited by government agencies and their indulged criminals - that is coming right ahead. Mark my words. We all have been there sometime.
edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: I thought it was ugly and decided to decorate it a bit.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: KARARYU

30% loss in processing...when i read that my first 2 thoughts:

- thats gonna piss off gamers and people rendering 3d, maybe making their cpu obsolete for the technology being used

- sounds like someone is crowdsourcing processing power for some agregate tasks like a neural net



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: rhynouk

Well I think I understand it just fine. It allows any regular user to access memory that holds things like passwords and any other data that should be only accessible by the kernel. This is pretty much root access, and it's hardwired into most processors.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying


Is it possible that the guys that accidently unearthed these bugs stumbled upon a backdoor that the alphabet agencies demanded that chip makers put in? It just seems unbelievable that for 20 years chip makers have had this kind of bug present without anyone pointing it out.

Imo they knew, but maintain plausible deniability by the 'announcement'. Its a confession, sort of.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: KARARYU

Sorry, you're hurting my mind with your post. Are you for real or do you have some real insight into all of this?



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:41 AM
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Wow. You are sooo smart. ALMOST as much as Trump saying: "I'm kinda smart". Take that as a praise. What is your problem?



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Haha. Nothing like being able to figure the obvious. And, I add to OUR finding: patches are not yet ready, only because they must be honing its invasive capability features as we talk, guided by the alphabet agencies.
edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying

There is so much that is left open for use by intelligence agencies.

Anyone using linux: I heard that some of the trusted authentication certificates are compromised. This is what a smart computer scientist said to me. He informed the FBI and they told him that they know and its ok.

He explained it better than me. Basically everything sold to regular people has backdoors and illicit access. He said the certificates in question are used to patch and update system critical resources.

You probably know more than me about it.

Have a good one.


edit on 1 6 2018 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: KARARYU

What the hell has Trump got to do with any of this? I'm talking about an exploit in Intel chips, and possibly ALL chips that everyone on the planet is currently using. This goes back at least 20 years. It's possible that this is a backdoor that was put into these chips by the chip makers at the direction from the alphabet agencies for a very long time. What the hell does this have to do with Trump?



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying



Great deduction


I've been reading, all of 2 articles....but never had a clue that the chip Architecture might be the elusive back-door we were told must exist but could not find.... (other than hoo-doo 666 chip nonsense for the www=666)



Thank You very much



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:13 AM
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originally posted by: KARARYU
Hackers like myself know of CPU cache flaw exploits for over a quarter of a century now. Then, out of the blue, we're exposed. Whoa. Suddenly, all of my red lights, horns and sirens went off... but not for obvious reasons. Couldn't THE PUBLIC DISCLOSURE of these flaws be a FALSEFLAG? You read it right. Won't THE PATCHES THEMSELVES be SLAVEWARES in disguise that can thrive on the processing power of billions of machines simultaneously, once installed, aiming at, for instance, mining cryptocurrency or, compromising our already almost none online privacy? And, in the sole, fortuitous case they ARE NOT, won't these same issued fixes be vulnerable to some exploit of whatever nature? - I'm already working on that - Enough conspirationism, let's call it a day and just have in mind that 1) the pseudo-whistle blower only made up for a new everyone's need: purchasing soon a new, faster, more secure machine. 2) Thus, evidencing that the most vulnerable part of any system, as cutting-edge as it can be, is our pockets. 3) No, it won't kill us all, it will only ruin our banking balance with everyone having to purchase machines with that "one new, revolutionary, exploit-proof processor" - meaning, with this and other bugs hidden enough to be only exploited by government agencies and their indulged criminals - that is coming right ahead. Mark my words. We all have been there sometime.

Oddly enough I was just discussing this the other day and asked the question, how do we know the patches themselves are not the vehicle to get the spyware into everyone's machines, especially those who have become suspicious of Microsoft pushing for free win 10 and other roll up updates that won't let you miss out in between updates plus their connections to the alphabet agencies.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying

Not only Intel chips, buddy. It has already been overly discoursed, first in specialized, then now in public media that these flaws affect just about every brand, every grade, ever issued. As our friend tadaman just said, "Basically everything sold to regular people has backdoors and illicit access." One cannot hide away when online - or even off - from "Big Brother", unless relying on some... say: "alien" computing technology. And about Trump... it has more to do with "Him" than you can imagine... or, the other way around, if you know I mean. Peace.

edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: Whoa, wrong mention...

edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: KARARYU

Patches?
I connect with web sites through at least one server that is monitored by hackers.
Everything I send or receive and at exactly what time can be copied and cloned both directions.

They set up the high speed dark pool front ends to monitor and manipulate the financial markets where the big money gambling is involved.

So the real reason why they announced a cache level hardware threat isn't entirely clear to me yet?



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying

I love the title: Spectre and Meltdown! Two cyber super heroes.
Maybe we simply reached the end of how many cores you can fit on the processor?
Or something similar. One last round selling us the old new high end machines.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: TheAiIsLying


For all practical purposes, I am pretty much computer-illiterate. Yes I own one and use one, but if anything goes wrong I must call upon friends for assistance.

I have kept up with things over the years, and I think your scenario is very plausible, perhaps even probable.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:20 AM
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IF the government agencies wanted a back door in processors.

We'd never have found out bout it.

And it is that simple.



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: CthulhuMythos

Well, it seems we have already a well-formed collective consensus out there. With everyone knowing they are transparent to the eyes of the powers. We are the steers, they are the human livestock managers. Unfortunately, otherwise as I would wish it was, you steers are in average too fat and too comfortable to react, then a worldwide mass power overturn is not at hand. Anyway, we can always post memes on Insta. I loved your avatar, by the way, first thing it reminded me of Roger from American Dad.


edit on 6-1-2018 by KARARYU because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2018 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

EXACTLY!!!



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