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Virtually ALL CPUs vulnerable to viral MELTDOWN security exploits

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posted on Jan, 4 2018 @ 11:41 PM
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Just in time for the new year; perfect time to roll out maybe new models/tech to upgrade to just as well!



Definitely sounds like perpetually disposable tech built for consumerism.

But how might this relate to globular meltdown or nwo, though?

A reason to ironically replace openly 'vulnerable' CPUs with new hardware containing securer yet covertly kill-switch 'compliant' chip, perhaps.




posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 12:10 AM
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originally posted by: Planette
Just in time for the new year; perfect time to roll out maybe new models/tech to upgrade to just as well!



Definitely sounds like perpetually disposable tech built for consumerism.

But how might this relate to globular meltdown or nwo, though?

A reason to ironically replace openly 'vulnerable' CPUs with new hardware containing securer yet covertly kill-switch 'compliant' chip, perhaps.



More the complexity of these chips. Using "Silicon compilers", the logic of a CPU (registers, logic units, instructions, interrupts, timing) can be designed and modeled as if it were a piece of software. When that design passes all the written tests (tape-out), that logic gets baked into hardware. Sometimes it's easier to use microcode, which is software that controls the sequencing and logic of the hardware to implement instructions. That can be upgraded if there are any bugs. That design method can go downwards like a hall of mirrors so that there is also nanocode and picocode, downloadable code that runs on smaller parts of the CPU.

As these CPU's are on sockets, they can be replaced. Many companies using HPC systems do an upgrade every six months anyway. They had processor problems six months ago as well:

www.theregister.co.uk...

As a CPU these days has hundreds of instructions being processed simultaneously by different logic units, the best human example would be like a hospital with waiting rooms (cache, storage buffers) and logic units (treatment rooms/doctors). You then want patients not to see each others notes (instruction/memory data).
Intel cut corners by putting everything into a single cache (waiting room) and not having any kind of data protection.



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 12:14 AM
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Literally intel collection inside.

Interesting post going around 4chan about ODINSEYE




posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 12:17 AM
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Intel chips having DOD level backdoors is old stuff.

The "kill switch" notion, along the theme of MELTingDOWN, hmm such a thing could stop an AI takeover of the planet, potentially... or ensure it...

edit on 5-1-2018 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 12:41 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
Intel chips having DOD level backdoors is old stuff.

The "kill switch" notion, along the theme of MELTingDOWN, hmm such a thing could stop an AI takeover of the planet, potentially...


Intel Anti-Theft v3.0 in vPro for laptops
security.stackexchange.com...



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 12:44 AM
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GPS tracker systems are venerable too with re-circuit/re-group for the cherry pickings too. What is the tech world to do if higher quality tech needs to be issued all at once for a hell.o.freezing reaction from all ms products?

It depends what tech is used succinct with the obsolescent faulty products with weak hardware bios too??

It is interesting when we will find out that higher tech in mass production to replace ms will be the savior.

Depends if current value of systems will not refreeze in multiple reactions entire nets like a fire catching.



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 01:12 AM
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So , let me sum this up
1)Intel , AMD , MS and others knew about this
2) The aforementioned were already trying to come up with fixes
3) Along comes Google and in all their idiocy release it to the world , including the bad guys

Way to go Google...



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 01:25 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
So , let me sum this up
1)Intel , AMD , MS and others knew about this
2) The aforementioned were already trying to come up with fixes
3) Along comes Google and in all their idiocy release it to the world , including the bad guys

Way to go Google...


If Intel knew about this flaws (not ME, that is separate problem) is pure speculation. Google found the flaws in autumn and as is good practice gave echo to Intel and OS developers first.

Intel was not able to solve problem on level of microcode so OS developers rolled patches because situation was ripe ...



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 01:27 AM
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it's not a flaw it's a back door....access for third paeties to get the data they want 24/7......not unlike a voting machine in the U.S.



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: JanAmosComenius

originally posted by: Gothmog
So , let me sum this up
1)Intel , AMD , MS and others knew about this
2) The aforementioned were already trying to come up with fixes
3) Along comes Google and in all their idiocy release it to the world , including the bad guys

Way to go Google...


If Intel knew about this flaws (not ME, that is separate problem) is pure speculation. Google found the flaws in autumn and as is good practice gave echo to Intel and OS developers first.

Intel was not able to solve problem on level of microcode so OS developers rolled patches because situation was ripe ...

I can tell you are not up to date on the articles , are you ?
Go read some
Hint: AMD had already been performing isolated lab tests last year....One is cleared by OS patch and the other 2 , AMD states at this time, are not vulnerable. I am dang sure glad I have been all AMD since the advent of the P2
Sundar , is that you ?

edit on 1/5/18 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)

edit on 1/5/18 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)

edit on 1/5/18 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: Planette
I was informed that my I7 was not affected by this. I guess that I am of a lucky few!!!



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 02:46 AM
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im not shure but meltdown seems overkill i mean why not just pump 4 or 5v into the cpu

ontop of that its always been possible to gain acsess to the bios in the motherboard and cause alot of damage ... even basic level acsess to windows could install a simple overclock tool and crank up the volts to cause damage


if its online it can be hacked and from there its easy to do this ... the reason u dont hear about it is most people who can do this dont want a dead computer they want acsess to the computer



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 02:56 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: JanAmosComenius

originally posted by: Gothmog
So , let me sum this up
1)Intel , AMD , MS and others knew about this
2) The aforementioned were already trying to come up with fixes
3) Along comes Google and in all their idiocy release it to the world , including the bad guys

Way to go Google...


If Intel knew about this flaws (not ME, that is separate problem) is pure speculation. Google found the flaws in autumn and as is good practice gave echo to Intel and OS developers first.

Intel was not able to solve problem on level of microcode so OS developers rolled patches because situation was ripe ...

I can tell you are not up to date on the articles , are you ?
Go read some
Hint: AMD had already been performing isolated lab tests last year....One is cleared by OS patch and the other 2 , AMD states at this time, are not vulnerable. I am dang sure glad I have been all AMD since the advent of the P2
Sundar , is that you ?


I'm afraid situation is still too muddy to pronounce any final judgement, but I'm still on design flaw side. This is too wide to be intentional.

Now I'm scratching my head what I'll do with those 70+ VMs running on 6 physicals. In some cases I simply can not afford 20% latency drop on particular databases ...



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 03:22 AM
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a reply to: Planette

Here's an insight from another site I frequent. Insight not mine, mind You -



To be fair to The Register, Intel officially knew about this since last June — almost certainly they knew earlier, off the record — but they still had half a year to release a fix on their own time. During that half year, all of us were vulnerable and they sat on their hands. In my opinion, The Register did not act unfairly. One can speculate on reasons but I cannot imagine that dev. time, alone, was the cause of the delay. Patches started appearing late last year, even in bleeding-edge Windows editions! Personally, I think they sat on their hands because they knew AMD had yet to release Ryzen. If they had come clean at the same time as the AMD launch, the effects would have crippled them. Personally, I know I wouldn’t have chosen the i7 7700K that I ended up with. And, in hindsight, with all the thermal issues I am having, the recent Intel Management Engine hacks and, now, this, I’m damn sad I chose that i7. I’m properly pissed, to be honest.


RPS



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 05:31 AM
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It'll be very interesting if INtel have to do a product recall on virtually all of their chips. Or at the very least, those chips that are still under warranty. It could cripple them.



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 06:57 AM
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We all need to learn linux or anything open source.



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 07:26 AM
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originally posted by: nowanmai
a reply to: Planette




... I’m damn sad I chose that i7...


Mind if I hop into that boat too?
edit on 5-1-2018 by wtfatta because: Missing quote



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: UpsideDownWorld
We all need to learn linux or anything open source.


It is good idea but if hardware is compromised we are on same boat with softies ... Probably the biggest trouble now have Amazon which is using for its hosting services Citrix/Xen server which is affected really hard: Memory dedicated to one VM is now accessible by other VMs residing on same physical host. Xen is based on Linux ...

1/3 of "web services", or what normal person have as "internet", is hosted by Amazon .... Just to put this mess in to scale ...
edit on 5-1-2018 by JanAmosComenius because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: wtfatta

Not sure, if I understood You completely, but why would I mind?
That wasn't even my writing. I just quoted someone off the 'net, that's all.



posted on Jan, 5 2018 @ 10:56 AM
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Here is the official paper:

meltdownattack.com...

There has been research going on for the past three years in this field:

arxiv.org...
dl.acm.org...

defuse.ca...

It's like having a bank vault that is either locked or unlocked depending on the angle you look at it.




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