It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Records Found in Dusty Basement Undermine Decades of Dietary Advice Muh Cholesterol

page: 5
27
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 11:55 AM
link   

originally posted by: EvidenceNibbler
a reply to: rickymouse

Your claim of the opiates in the wheat, where is the evidence?

ETA.
ok, i understand what you were trying to say.

. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, 


I like when someone looks up what I am saying so they can gain interest and keep learning instead of just taking what I say with a grain of salt. Keep it up, let your curiosity drive you to discover new things. I learn from everyone, sometimes people do not understand why something works for them and jump at the first piece of evidence to form a conclusion for why it works. I try to set them straight, not slam them with a debunk right away, this site gives me incentive to research more. I was taking all sorts of free classes from England on medicine and nutrition and metabolism. It took me a long time to complete them, I tend to want to know why and many times even the instructors do not know why. So I research to see if I can find the answer and possible solutions so the problem won't occur.

One thing I dislike greatly, the statement that something has been shown to cause cancer in California. Evidently they are a bunch of nuts there, you cannot take one chemistry out of a food and say it causes cancer and disreguard other chemistry in the food or not consider companion chemistry eaten in the diet. There are too many research sites trying to gain recognition and only considering a specific chemistry. The only thing I know that will always cause cancer if eaten on a regular basis so far is arsenic. Other chemicals in the diet can often be detoxed by companion food chemistry. Sure, if you do not eat the companion chemistry or make proper detox enzymes or biological chemistry to detox something it can lead to cancer. Constantly eating foods that block immune response can lead to cancer. It can also lead to getting diseases more often if you constantly block immune response, but it does make the chance of a cytokine storm killing you less of a risk.

Sorry for getting off topic so much.




posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 12:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: EvidenceNibbler
a reply to: rickymouse

Your claim of the opiates in the wheat, where is the evidence?

ETA.
ok, i understand what you were trying to say.

. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, 


The opiod peptide in milk is much stronger than in wheat. It's action is actually different, it calms more than the wheat peptides. The last I checked, there were four in wheat, three types in milk, and Rye has two but they are different than the wheat ones. Oats also contain some opiate peptides, but they do not seem to cause nearly as much of a problem with digestion as the wheat ones.

Barley has some really good chemistry and some bad chemistry. Overall, organic barley can be considered a medicine in my judgement. Just how to use that chemistry I have not completely determined yet, I do know where else to find a similar and even better type of that chemistry. Like the skin of a pear and rind of a watermelon and the sheath where the grain tops enter the stalk of the plant. I am sure there are other places in nature too, but knowing what part of things contain this and the taste of the chemical helps to identify it's presence. It is actually a pleasing taste, kind of like a very mild glucose chemisitry. That is a growth and repair hormone type chemistry, but remember, it also helps cancer if other caffeic acid chemistry is not there to help to destroy cancer.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:27 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

I have sub clinical gluten insensitivity. I had been tested by doctors on two occasions for celiac which proved negative. Cutting gluten out of my diet was essential for my health, but the doctors were no help there. The tests they did indicated gluten wasn't a problem. Ultimately we are responsible for our own diets and knowing what we can and cannot eat.

I see you mentioned you have kidney issues, what is it, and how did that develop?

Here is a scholarly article that backs up your opioid hypothesis.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

edit on 2-1-2018 by EvidenceNibbler because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: EvidenceNibbler
a reply to: rickymouse

I have sub clinical gluten insensitivity. I had been tested by doctors on two occasions for celiac which proved negative. Cutting gluten out of my diet was essential for my health, but the doctors were no help there. The tests they did indicated gluten wasn't a problem. Ultimately we are responsible for our own diets and knowing what we can and cannot eat.

I see you mentioned you have kidney issues, what is it, and how did that develop?


When I was in a car accident, I got temporal lobe epilepsy from it. The meds I took were not very good on my health, some made my teeth push up and they broke off, one actually increased my seizure activity. I found from genetics that I can not tolerate the five medicines they used for different reasons, I almost lost my feet, they were all black and swollen for a couple of years of the five years I took the meds. I now control the seizures by diet, using some of the same chemistry as the meds in rotation. That twenty five hundred bucks a month in meds was replaced with about twenty bucks a month of the foods that are the basis of the meds. Except for the sodium valproate, it blocks sodium use by the body with completely synthetic chemistry action. Two of the meds caused most of the problems. Also, they put me on Bextra for pain, that was hard on the kidneys, I was rushed to the ER from the doctors office, my BP was way too high. Bextra was found later to raise Blood pressure to dangerous levels.

I know two other people who wound up on dialysis from taking the valproate. It is a side effect of the drug in some people.

My liver pretty much recovered, I used milk thistle to try to help that and it seemed to clear up the pain in the liver. I do have less enzyme production though. I was constipated badly after the accident, all the way thorough the five years on meds and it damaged my guts. It took about five years after I was off to get away from the black stools which meant that I was bleeding somewhere in the intestines. I still have residual problems with the large intestine, but I will live, it just does not push things through very good anymore. Fiber does nothing, the liver damage seemed to effect the amylase production pretty much, I always had a problem with eating fiber, it just got worse. Part of it may have just been a reduction because of age too, I will never know for sure.

If I try to control my temporal lobe epilepsy with one chemistry alone, I wind up with side effects. I cannot use strictly cabbage chemistry, nor can I use a high fat diet completely. I also can not use only asparagus chemistry. Magnesium supplements do help one part but not the effect on the muscles, they spasm if I just try to use magnesium, getting stuck on or something. From research I found that magnesium does not fix all of the signal problems. I also can't eat a lot of sweets, sugar can increase seizure activity. I learned all this because I had to research how to fix my problem, the neurologist saw the meds were killing me, I wanted to keep trying but she said she did not want to see me die. Controlling it by diet is not so convenient as taking a pill, but I have no options in the matter.

Most of these meds are not tolerated by far northern Europeans. The Pharma companies know that, I saw the information on their drug testing results. Less than half of the Laplander and Swedes and finns and Norwegians can tolerate them. Well, I found out I am not a minority in it if I lived in Northern Finland. I would guess it applies to many people around here who are offspring of that bunch of Scandinavian people.

I don't blame my neurologist, she had no way of knowing, my regular doctor kept giving me more and more meds for everything, and sending me for every test she could send me for. Between our health insurance and the car insurance, I was a cash cow. This is how I know about this kind of stuff, from experiencing it first hand.

I should go see my neurologist to see if she can suggest any other chemistry that would work in foods. I am kind of sick of cabbage and asparagus and greasy sausages and meats. The rest of the cruciferous veggies do not work well to control my epilepsy for some reason, they also cause me some serious problems if I overeat them. They block folate, I already have genetic problems with folate metabolism.

Oh well, the Sodium valproate actually hurt my kidneys I have concluded, I will just have to live with it. I have a good doctor now, I told him I am intolerant to a lot of meds genetically. I can take anything for a couple of weeks, but I cannot even take multivitamins for too long.

I will eventually find a way to help the kidneys heal, I am going to keep trying the taurine, it does reduce my urination somewhat. But it does not fix the problem, according to medical research it should be able to stimulate repair of the kidneys to a point. I have been having this issue for many years now, I am a lot better now that I know I pee everything out and know how to supplement things. It takes years to figure out how to compensate correctly and identify deficiency symptoms as they apply to me.

I talked to a woman I know who works as a nutritionist for people who do dialysis. I learned some things from her, but she learned a lot from me on how to live with it. I kind of impressed her a little, I would like to discuss it more with her some day out in the blueberry patch three miles away. I know her from years ago, I did not know she was not a specialist in that. I will have to see her some day to discuss things with her, maybe I can get her to think out of the box that medicine has stuck her into. Maybe she will be able to discuss it with her colleges and adapt their practices to help people with my particular kidney situation for a while while they wait. But I still have more to learn yet, testing on oneself takes a lot of time and a lot of research.

For now, I can live with my type of kidney damage. I have lived with it for over eight years now.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 11:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: EvidenceNibbler
a reply to: rickymouse

I have sub clinical gluten insensitivity. I had been tested by doctors on two occasions for celiac which proved negative. Cutting gluten out of my diet was essential for my health, but the doctors were no help there. The tests they did indicated gluten wasn't a problem. Ultimately we are responsible for our own diets and knowing what we can and cannot eat.

I see you mentioned you have kidney issues, what is it, and how did that develop?


I had to look up sub clinical gluten sensitivity. I know quite a bit about that after actually looking up what it meant. That sensitivity can be to the lectin in wheat, the whey. Or it can be to the gluten and the improper activity of the colon caused by the opiate peptides. It can also be caused by the pesticide and preharvest treatment with glyphosate. It can have different causes. If you can eat commercial oatmeal and cheerios without it bothering you, it probably is not the pesticide or glyphosate Preharvest treatment which started in around 2011. The pesticides were before that. Both of these are also used on oats and the special type of beta glucans in oats will not cancel out those effects. The beta glucans in Oats do have some good protective properties, just not for organophosphates.

Many people have problems with the opiate peptides in wheat, they effect the gut more than the ones in oats. The oats give you a good feeling, but do not slow down the parastalic action of the gut so much. Rye has different opiate peptides than wheat too, a wheat intolerance is often misdiagnosed as a gluten intolerance. Some people can eat Rye bread, especially if it is let sit for a while in a fridge so the enzymes can break down the gluten and lower the availability of the opiates it contains. Europeans have eaten Rye for thousands of years, wheat was introduced to northern Europe only about eight hundred years ago and the wheat has been cherrypicked lately to increase the gluten and opiate peptide chemistry to calm people. When I say recently, I mean two hundred years of selecting the best doping strains. People actually like to be calm and enjoy life, they like the effect, but too much can have severe health problems.

Potatoes are a better starch anyway, they moderately temporarily inhibit the acetylcholinesterase activity and make you think more clearly, as long as you eat some foods containing choline or betain....choline is high in eggs and betain is found in beets and spinach. Wherever you seem to find high betain you seem to find high oxylates though and that can increase kidney stone formation if you don't make much of the enzyme to break it down or consume foods that inhibit the enzymes that breaks down oxylates. Lots of things have oxylates but if they contain calcium or calcium is consumed at the same time, they just form stones in the gut instead of the kidneys.

The last I have researched is lectins, Lectins, like the gluten is a plant defense system chemistry used to deter overbrowsing and overpopulation by the insects, animals, and microbes. To us they can cause anti-nutrient factors to occur if you eat too much. Some people can detox these better than others in their daily diet. Not everyone can be a vegetarian. I mentioned before that the gluten and lectins in wheat are a double whammy.

Not all chemistry plants make is bad, if you start eating blueberries or other berries in the woods, pretty soon you will have to pee or poop. Just like the animals do. The reason is the plant has evolved to get self fertilized, the berries and plant grow better if they have fertilizer. When you go out walking in the woods, you usually go off the path behind a tree or trees to pee. Why is that? Because our animal instincts tell us to fertilize the tree? It seems natural. The blueberry bush gives animals food to spread it's seeds, which actually pass through the animals guts and it helps them get started. The plant cannot move to get food so it attracts the animals to the plant and makes them poop and pee. This to me shows that plants have intelligence, they also attract wasps with chemicals if they are being eaten by worms the wasps can kill or they make chemistry that kills the bugs. Wheat and all grains contain some of these different types of attractant/repellant chemistry.

Boy, I go off topic a lot. I try to control that, but it never seems to work.

Bone broth made from organic bones or soup made from organic cartilaginous soup bones can help with gluten intollerance. The reason why is the glucosamine in the geletin binds to the gluten and peptides and they get expelled from the body. According to what I have researched, even jello will work, there is always room for Jello. It will not take care of a lot of gluten, but that bowl of real soup will help with gluten, I can actually say I think that works, I have bread with my soup lots of times and it does not seem to bother me much. My soups are usually made with soup bones, because it dampens epilepsy. It does not dampen my ability to think deeply though, like breads do and anything aged. You can just take a glucosamine pill though, that is what they are testing in their research, but I like soup and jello and they are rich in glucosamine the way I make them. And they are cheaper than taking a pill.



posted on Jan, 3 2018 @ 12:03 AM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

I would like to thank you for your contributions. Your knowledge is vast and like others, i enjoy your posts.
edit on 3-1-2018 by Sapphire because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2018 @ 10:39 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Very true. We are all different but a keto diet does seem to work for almost all most people who try it.

Of course the quality of the food, avoiding processed foods etc are also vitally important.

I’ve been on keto a full year and along with BJJ and exercise helped me go from 195 to 170 lbs at age 38 and I feel better than ever.



new topics




 
27
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join