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Trump sums up Global Warming in one Savage Tweet

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posted on Jan, 19 2018 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015
Solar maxium into solar minimum, volcanic activity, etc.
The 2010 Icelandic Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption spewed more Co2 Than man kind has in the complete history of the world.
In the past most of the planet was covered in lush green jungles with temps up to 140* and then periods of complete ice coverage.

we're actually in the midst of the ice age cycles currently

The last 3 million years have been characterized by cycles of glacials and interglacials within a gradually deepening ice age. Currently, the Earth is in an interglacial period, beginning about 20,000 years ago (20 kya).

The cycles of glaciation involve the growth and retreat of continental ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere and involve fluctuations on a number of time scales, notably on the 21 ky, 41 ky and 100 ky scales. Such cycles are usually interpreted as being driven by predictable changes in the Earth orbit known as Milankovitch cycles. At the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene (0.8 million years ago, close to the Brunhes–Matuyama geomagnetic reversal) there has been a largely unexplained switch in the dominant periodicity of glaciations from the 41 ky to the 100 ky cycle.

The gradual intensification of this ice age over the last 3 million years has been associated with declining concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, though it remains unclear if this change is sufficiently large to have caused the changes in temperatures. Decreased temperatures can cause a decrease in carbon dioxide as, by Henry's Law, carbon dioxide is more soluble in colder waters, which may account for 30ppmv of the 100ppmv decrease in carbon dioxide concentration during the last glacial maximum. [1]




posted on Jan, 19 2018 @ 03:32 PM
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nvm


edit on 19-1-2018 by EvidenceNibbler because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2018 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: ChrisM101

Not true.

Of course you have no source to back up your claim.

A little Snopes fact check shows you are an idiot or intentionally trying to spread disinfo.

www.snopes.com...



posted on Jan, 19 2018 @ 06:42 PM
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originally posted by: ChrisM101
The 2010 Icelandic Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption spewed more Co2 Than man kind has in the complete history of the world.

While the whole 'anthropogenic' influence on climate shifting is one I don't agree with, in an effort to be honest, let's take a look at some real numbers and not some "off-the-cuff" emotionally driven rhetoric.

First a little 'blast from the past', so I'll take us back to 2004. Somewhere in the vicinity of December 2004, Mount Saint Helens in Washington State, USA had a resurgence of volcanic activity. At that time, roughly 15 million tonnes of sulfur dioxide annually in the atmosphere were the result of magma ejections. If you're unfamiliar with sulfur dioxide as a gas, it is basically the gas being released as the magma boils and bubbles to the surface. In comparison, at that time (now 14 years ago) Manufacturing plants were responsible for approximately 200 million tonnes annually. Since then much curbing has been affected to reduce the throughput, but sulfur dioxide is notoriously a 'tough nut' and hangs around for quite some time. Also, at this time (and taking the upper bounds of the expulsion rate), approximately 1000 tonnes per day or 365 million tonnes annually of CO2 were being ejected from the volcano. In stark comparison (again at that time 14 years ago) anthropogenic based CO2 ejection - power plants, vehicles, the suite of fossil fuel based consumption - was in the vicinity of 26 billion tonnes annually. A Yellowstone level VEI 8 that lasted weeks long still would not eject 26 billion tonnes of CO2.

This is simply a comparison in fairness and to keep things on a level playing field here.

With respect to the April - May Eyjafjallajokull eruption event, the overall CO2 impact was recorded to be about 1.5 x 10^8 kilograms. each day, or 150 million kilograms per day OR 150,000 metric tonnes per day. Over a 6 day period from April 14th to April 20th, 2010 it can be estimated that 900,000 metric tonnes of CO2 were ejected from the event, with sporadic minor events that added little impact. A conservative value of 1.3 to 2.8 million tonnes of CO2 were prevented from entering the atmosphere simply by the interruption to air travel at the time. For lack of better terminology...they cancelled each other out.



In the past most of the planet was covered in lush green jungles with temps up to 140* and then periods of complete ice coverage.

we're actually in the midst of the ice age cycles currently

The last 3 million years have been characterized by cycles of glacials and interglacials within a gradually deepening ice age. Currently, the Earth is in an interglacial period, beginning about 20,000 years ago (20 kya).

The cycles of glaciation involve the growth and retreat of continental ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere and involve fluctuations on a number of time scales, notably on the 21 ky, 41 ky and 100 ky scales. Such cycles are usually interpreted as being driven by predictable changes in the Earth orbit known as Milankovitch cycles. At the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene (0.8 million years ago, close to the Brunhes–Matuyama geomagnetic reversal) there has been a largely unexplained switch in the dominant periodicity of glaciations from the 41 ky to the 100 ky cycle.

The gradual intensification of this ice age over the last 3 million years has been associated with declining concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, though it remains unclear if this change is sufficiently large to have caused the changes in temperatures. Decreased temperatures can cause a decrease in carbon dioxide as, by Henry's Law, carbon dioxide is more soluble in colder waters, which may account for 30ppmv of the 100ppmv decrease in carbon dioxide concentration during the last glacial maximum. [1]


Again, stay focused on SO2 and CH4 as the culprits and not CO2 and most of all, lets not forget water vapor considering it makes up more than 90% of GHG's (in as much as you've basically copy/pasted from Wikipedia without so much as denoting it as an external source).

Let's not muddy the waters....

If your attempt is to de-demonize mankind as the antagonist, you have to start from the position of actually believing that you could be, then work your way from there.



posted on Jan, 19 2018 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: alphabetaone

We need the raw data .

Where is it??




 
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