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Death Of The Giant Salmon

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posted on Dec, 28 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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Not sure about the Salmon but many species including some Tuna don't reach sexual maturity for 30 years or longer. We've fished out all the large ones capable of laying eggs and will soon see catches drop dramatically. Scary stat: about 1/3 of all the protein consumed by humans comes in the form of seafood. With overfishing, Fukushima, Deepwater disaster and various pollutants we've exhausted the oceans' ability to heal itself. We will reap the whirlwind for this in the near future.




posted on Dec, 28 2017 @ 09:19 PM
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originally posted by: pavil
Are Salmon an annual migration species, ie did they get that huge in one year? Some food supply in the ocean has to have diminished since then.


The Salmon in the picture is a different kind of Salmon. Maybe it is dying off. They still get big salmon spawning in Alaska, I know someone who goes fishing up there every year, but on a commercial fishing boat, there are a lot of big salmon there yet. These would be the summer spawning Chinnooks, evidently they are not running much anymore for some reason.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 04:37 AM
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In late June of 2000 I caught a 23 pound King in the Yentna River. That's about 80 miles north of Anchorage. The limit was one fish per day for out of state fishermen. The wildlife was incredible.


I don't think I will eat Pacific fish after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: Kester

That's a whole lotta lox.
Someone go buy bagels. Ill get the cream cheese.

That's actually what I'm having for breakfast today. Really.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

A spawning salmon turns bright red the flesh begins to soften. This is the best state to catch a salmon in. Rich buttery flavor. Some fish get a stronger flavor as they age. Salmon and stripped bass stay the same throughout their lives. Salmon changes when it's dying but spawning is still very much alive and strong enough to swim against the river currents to lay their eggs in the river they were born in. People praise the salmon in this rare state.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: pavil

Depending on the species of salmon they spend anywhere from eighteen months to eight years in the ocean. They remain in the the fresh water river they are born in for about a year before migrating to ocean feeding grounds.
edit on 12292017 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

My favorite fish. Raw, smoked, grilled or pan seared.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

I've lived every one of my sixty years on the eastern seaboard. We don't get salmon here except in the fish market or grocery store.
My brother is a sports fisherman. He fishes the great south bay off of long island. He has caught some monster blues and stripers. Blues I like little. What we called snapper size.
I learned how to fillet a fish on the pier but youtube really brought my skills up to another level.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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This is unfortunately much ado about nothing. All of the androynomous fisheries are on death watch, up and down our Pacific Coasts. First, there were giant stainless steel casks of highly radioactive wastes, dumped into the Sea of Okask, by the U.S.S.R. And they cracked and started leaking transuranic poisons. Next, Fukashima belched enormous radioactivity into Japanese waters. All of this is slowly working up into the Salmonids' oceanic food chains, and someday, not too far out, we will have to blockade them out of all of our Western Rivers. Otherwise, their dead carcasses will begin irradiating our inland waterways, and then be spread further, by predatory birds, like American Bald Eagles.

Regardless of the Green Weenies, our American Western inhabitants, can't and won't, put up with letting everyone be poisoned, with Russian and Japanese radiation. Heck! Gov't agents have already given some local Indian activists a "heads up", about the earlier Sea of Okosk leakages. Interestingly, it's going to poison Eastern Russian rivers just as quick, or maybe even quicker.

As the previous poster noted, with the Salmon biting off the tail of another fish, shows that they are near the top of the Fisheries' food chains. Marine Birds and Mammals are even higher up, where we are, but any and all salmon, will concentrate radiation mobilized into oceanic food chains, some 10 to the Sixth or Seventh power. So a Salmon can carry a million times the oceans' radiation doses, in every pound of it's flesh.

In Minamoto, Japan, poor fishermen ate contaminated food from their bay, seven days a week, and picked up lethal doses of chemically absorbed Hg, or Mercury. Some menial seaweed plant in that bay, metabolized Hg, and then it worked up in their food chain. The weeds cleansed out the Hg, from the contaminated waters, but directed it into the food chains of myriads of tiny fish. Japanese chew on these tiny dried fish, like we chew on cracker jacks. They buy boxes about the same size as our old Cracker Jacks and use it for snack food. So, many poor souls in Japan, who had never been out on that bay, in any boat, suffered terribly with mercury poisonings. They lost control of their limbs, and were reduced to shaking shells of themselves.
edit on 29-12-2017 by carpooler because: Hg Poisoning results.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

You are very sweet today.
God bless!
And may this new year be bring you the best happiness that money cannot buy.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: testingtesting
a reply to: SprocketUK



We get plenty of trout in the beck down my road and the river calder has had salmon returning near Dewsbury.

I think our waterways are getting better.


Might be sometrhing to that, though I have yet to hear of any significant salmon runs through my old town in years.

fly-fish-guide.net... Just for a bit of history. Well done Miss Davy



Thiis years catch reports do look as though things are on the up though.

www.herefordtimes.com...

edit on 36pFri, 29 Dec 2017 14:28:36 -060020172017-12-29T14:28:36-06:00kAmerica/Chicago31000000k by SprocketUK because: spelling



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: carpooler

I advise people not to eat fish more than twice a week. It is just too polluted.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: carpooler

Do you have some links to credible sites with information about this regarding fish coming from the Alaska fisheries? Where on the FDA site would I find this info?

The FDA has never found an issue with the fish coming from Alaska and the false information coming from radical activists or the marketing people pushing Atlantic fish do harm to real people, while the fish are safe and do no harm to anyone. Yes, marketing people really do push false narratives to harm competitors. Like activists, they rely on the fact people don't really look into whether or not information is true.

The Minamata (not Minamoto) story is from 1956, so likely not only irrelevant, it's suspicious it's used now. The only remaining impact of that is political and local. Why go back 61 years? What's the motivation in that?



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

The problem what we had around here is about 15 years ago some animal activists set a few hundred mink free and they ate all the fish and all the local wildlife. I still see some on the canal banks sometimes but I heard people were killing them on sight.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: testingtesting
probably something to that, there was a pollution issue with nitrates off farmers fields and even possibly acid rain in the Wye plus the commmercial fishing taking a toll.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

Also good to see the herons back also. So my river must be doing better.
Bumped into one this morning under a bridge,stared at each other for five mins then woosh away with one flap of the wings.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: worldstarcountry

A spawning salmon turns bright red the flesh begins to soften. This is the best state to catch a salmon in. Rich buttery flavor. Some fish get a stronger flavor as they age. Salmon and stripped bass stay the same throughout their lives. Salmon changes when it's dying but spawning is still very much alive and strong enough to swim against the river currents to lay their eggs in the river they were born in. People praise the salmon in this rare state.


Once a salmon has turned red, nobody wants them. I think you have been misinformed unless you are referring to the red meat. I grew up in salmon country.

link in case you are interested
forums.outdoorsdirectory.com...
edit on 29-12-2017 by Halfswede because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: testingtesting


I dont fish much anymore, but encounters like that stayed with me all my life, I can still remember a kingfiisher on the tip of my float rod one morning on the river Lugg. He knew I wasnt gonna catch anything way before I did



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

I don't fish I kayak 😀 normally down canals and ï love it. bottle of scotch my hammock and magic fags pretending I'm a viking lol.
Never seen a kingfisher yet near me but I'm off for a week in Jan and I'm gonna try and paddle to Manchester.



posted on Dec, 29 2017 @ 03:25 PM
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originally posted by: testingtesting
a reply to: SprocketUK

I don't fish I kayak 😀 normally down canals and ï love it. bottle of scotch my hammock and magic fags pretending I'm a viking lol.
Never seen a kingfisher yet near me but I'm off for a week in Jan and I'm gonna try and paddle to Manchester.


I like the sound of that, I keep trying to persuade the Mrs to go for a canoe holiday down the Wye. No luck yet though.

I do like the bottle of Scotch idea.




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