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Australian Gov't advising to stay home during bushfires

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posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 11:53 PM
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I heard an odd radio advertisement today on Melbourne's Triple M 105.1FM. I haven't been able to find it recorded anywhere.

It was an official Government advertisement that said something like: "During the event of a bushfire you need to stay home if the fire is more that 2 streets away. Leaving will block emergency services from arriving at the scene"

This really stood out because it seems to go against everything the Gov't advises to leave:




You should never wait to receive an official warning before you leave. Fires can start quickly and threaten homes and lives within minutes.


from Country Fire Authority - Warnings




Community Fire Refuges (CFRs) are only activated and opened once there is significant fire in the local area. Community Fire Refuges offer a last resort shelter option if you cannot leave the area in the event of a fire. The presence of emergency services is not guaranteed at a community fire refuge. Safe travel to and from the site cannot be guaranteed.Remember: the safest option is always to leave high-risk areas early before there are any signs of fire.


from CFA Fire Refuges

Did anyone else hear this? It seems really odd to advise people to wait at home and potentially burn to death.




posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi

i can hardly agree that if a bushfire is 2 streets away it can be considered "leaving early"



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:01 AM
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a reply to: choos

How far apart are the streets?


But seriously, sounds like a retraction would be imminent.

edit on 12/19/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:06 AM
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a reply to: Phage

2 streets away in a suburban area aint more than a few hundred metres.
edit on 19-12-2017 by choos because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:12 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: choos

How far apart are the streets?


But seriously, sounds like a retraction would be imminent.





No, I'm fairly certain this advice is to people who ignored the initial advice to leave before the fires are at you're doorstep, fires are fairly common here, especially when dry and hot like it is now.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed


No, I'm fairly certain this advice is to people who ignored the initial advice to leave before the fires are at you're doorstep
That is in direct conflict with what the OP recollects about the PSA. If the fire is two streets away it is not at your doorstep.

I think that the OP misinterpreted, or there will be a retraction.

edit on 12/19/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:16 AM
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originally posted by: Kalixi
I heard an odd radio advertisement today on Melbourne's Triple M 105.1FM. I haven't been able to find it recorded anywhere.

It was an official Government advertisement that said something like: "During the event of a bushfire you need to stay home if the fire is more that 2 streets away. Leaving will block emergency services from arriving at the scene"

This really stood out because it seems to go against everything the Gov't advises to leave:




You should never wait to receive an official warning before you leave. Fires can start quickly and threaten homes and lives within minutes.


from Country Fire Authority - Warnings




Community Fire Refuges (CFRs) are only activated and opened once there is significant fire in the local area. Community Fire Refuges offer a last resort shelter option if you cannot leave the area in the event of a fire. The presence of emergency services is not guaranteed at a community fire refuge. Safe travel to and from the site cannot be guaranteed.Remember: the safest option is always to leave high-risk areas early before there are any signs of fire.


from CFA Fire Refuges

Did anyone else hear this? It seems really odd to advise people to wait at home and potentially burn to death.


It's nothing to worry about. Its just the Australian govt taking its orders from their US 'friends' and getting on board with program. The program being to get people killed in bushfires, anything that causes death is part of the population control agenda.

Look at it this way.

If the name of the game was to save lives in bush fire areas, they would enable dwellings and other buildings to be built without gutters to assist keeping the roof free of debris.

Secondly, they would require all homes in an area with a given bush fire risk rating to have a safe room 'x' distance from a dwelling or the nearest tree of a certain height. This building would have a 4 hour fire rating, be able to accommodate 4-6 people and have breathable air. Such a building would be used as a tool and lawn mover shed whenever its not used as fire refuge centre.

I'm taking about a brick or concrete tiltup panel garden shed thats about as long and nearly as wide as a family car, with a concrete panel roof and a door with a 2 or 4 hour fire rating. Most bush fires come and go within about 20 minutes so a 4 hour fire rating is way over the top but thats what the govt would demand.

This way nobody would have to evacuate and sleep in the local shire hall etc but at the same time they would be safe and be able to take food and water with them to last them 2-3 days.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:19 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Perhaps, but that makes no sense, when a fire breaks out and is threatening homes there is major media saturation and well as a large roll out of authorities, and the the thick grey smoke covering most of the skyline.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:20 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

Yeah. So saying "stay put" seems like odd advice. Odder still if the flames are closer.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:29 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Not really, the fires are bad and you are caught up in them you're pretty much screwed, leaving the house is certain death, staying well that's likely a death sentence too, but you might get lucky.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

2 streets is better than no streets.
But being long gone is better still.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 01:36 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Fire travels fast, really fast, there's is no way of outrunning it. Like I said you get caught up in it dig hole or something.

Firefighter trucks are built in such a way, if caught up in the fire, hiding in truck is the only chance of survival, and that's not guaranteed.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: Phage

2 streets may actually be too late by the time you get the family ready and in the car, the fire could already be on top of you.

2 streets is much too late.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: choos

I agree.

I get it, I think. Oz way of saying, "You idiot, you waited too long. Just die and stay out of our way."
edit on 12/19/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: Phage

not exactly a home is possibly safer than a car.
so many have died in a car trying to outrun a bushfire by leaving too late. not saying a house is 100% safe but is possibly safer than trying to outrun a bushfire at the last second.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 03:13 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: choos

I agree.

I get it, I think. Oz way of saying, "You idiot, you waited too long. Just die and stay out of our way."





well we don't joke in these situations, if you ignore the warning chances are you're an idiot.


We have masses of eucalyptus trees , the oil gets superheated and vaporizes above the tree canopy and acts as a superconductor, that oil vapor burns well and travels at several hundred kilometres an hour, destroying pretty much everything in its path.wiki
edit on 19-12-2017 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: l



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 03:23 AM
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What about making a counter-fire by controlled burning of otherwise hazardous brushwood? Taking down some trees around your estate? Just,.. you know.., not to decrease the view, but increase the survivability both of lives and property? Oh, insurances.. Yeah. Those will be cheap around prior or high-possibility-future bushfire-prone areas! Sure!

Building a firesafe place out of concrete on government's orders? Whats next, taking away guns? No, seriously, that amount of concrete (fireproof, including some cooling mechanics, otherwise it would have to be reaaall thick) would cost a fortune.. Don't think that this idea would be supported much.

No.

I would run. Can't fight it with your garden hose.



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 08:29 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: choos

How far apart are the streets?


But seriously, sounds like a retraction would be imminent.


I know it's a "how long is a piece of string" question. I assume that they are talking about rural acreage properties



posted on Dec, 19 2017 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I think your right about that one, :-)

We live in a high fire area national park, in fact N.S.W had over 70 fires last weekend. When it comes to the more serious one's we receive a phone call at home from emergency services, hours prior to any catastrophic fires hitting us.

Then if we were stupid enough not to leave the area as warned, the RFS (Rural Fire Service) generally know who is around still, they turn up and give it all they have got, lots of appliances and man power if available, they fight hard and usually win, but of course on occasions they have no chance of winning. I get the idea, that where they can, they want everyone out of the danger zone, In our region everyone is well notified. If you cant smell it coming or see the smoke, or take a warning in which we have many available you are living under a rock and your success in life may be limited.

I have seen those who have decided not to leave due to what ever reasons and have seen the RFS turn up and defend the ones who stay, always to the bitter end or until they are safe. It is best that you leave when you know about the danger, serious fires are terrifying. To survive in our neck of the woods you better have a plan!



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