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A close call that never was made public

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posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:18 PM
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Just related to men today by a crew member-friend who was on the flight.

I didn't ask the flight number and won't mention the airline. It occurred in Feb. this year.

LA to Mammoth-Yosemite Ca. I checked and it is apparently number eight in the most 'challenging' airports in the U.S..

Apparently a turbulent environment. This day much worse than normal. The office requested an attempt. The weather briefly improved and they began descent. The plane was a Bombardier Q400. (The following is based on FAA and corporate investigation that concluded months after.)

At 4,000 feet they hit a wind shear and lost all lift, they literally fell for 17 seconds. The book stated no max power until 500 feet. At 497 they hit max power. At 486 feet, they caught air again. Seven seconds remaining at the rate of fall.

They returned to LA and none of the crew of 4 would step into a plane for two days. The aircraft was parked, of course, for full inspection. Both engines had been over-torqued(?) and required replacement.

A pilot from a sister company who had access to the full report said the rate of fall was unbelievable. It was also said that that particular aircraft was about perfect for that situation and a Turbo-fan likely wouldn't have recovered in that circumstance.

That's how it was related to me. I thought it might be interesting to those who know more about these things.
edit on 17-12-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-12-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-12-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Fell for 17 seconds!!

I imagine the crew needed a change of pants after that.

I'd be wearing depends on all my flights after that.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

I forgot one point, the pilot was female and the FAA said she followed the book perfectly.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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Down to 500 feet before hitting the throttles?

Is that recommended procedure?



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: nwtrucker

Fell for 17 seconds!!

I imagine the crew needed a change of pants after that.

I'd be wearing depends on all my flights after that.


Yes, 48 passengers all screaming, as well. Apparently, it's a tough enough landing even in normal conditions that the crew fully prepares the passengers before descent. The Captain is required to make all landings, at least with that airline at Mammoth.
edit on 17-12-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-12-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:34 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
Down to 500 feet before hitting the throttles?

Is that recommended procedure?


That's what I asked. I was told yes. Maybe being a Turbo-prop has something to do with it?



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Owen's Valley, backside of the Sierras. Big ol' sink hole back there.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Oh holy crap!

The crew cleaning up the airplane must have to have worked over time to clean that plane up.

I can't even imagine the level of terror I'd be feeling, falling for that long. I'm surprised more people didn't speak up about the ordeal. That should of been in the news.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: nwtrucker

Oh holy crap!

The crew cleaning up the airplane must have to have worked over time to clean that plane up.

I can't even imagine the level of terror I'd be feeling, falling for that long. I'm surprised more people didn't speak up about the ordeal. That should of been in the news.



One would think. Maybe it got a little exposure on a busy news day or something. Very minor injuries only, may have had something to do with it.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 05:59 PM
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"This is your pilot speaking. For those passengers who noticed a brief 17 second period of zero gravity several moments ago we deeply apologize. Just as soon as the cabin crew have put on fresh uniforms and underwear, they will be around to help assist anyone who may have spilled their dinner and drinks on the ceiling or walls"



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:00 PM
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Got what you're saying but what's the point?

No offence intended but honestly do you think we're going to hear all the 'horror stories' of any mass transit?

Not being confrontational, I'm asking what your conclusion to the incident is.




posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: silo13
Got what you're saying but what's the point?

No offence intended but honestly do you think we're going to hear all the 'horror stories' of any mass transit?

Not being confrontational, I'm asking what your conclusion to the incident is.




My conclusion is 'if it's not your time? It's not your time.'

I tip my hat to all involved.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:25 PM
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with no approach direction choice usually

we end up with a 25 knot tail wind and it's not inherently safe therefore yezz......and then why

are the high aspect wings,,,,,long and skinny suckers,,,,,allowed....it's like having two wings then one at speed and a tricky one on approach when icing....DC-3 wouldn't do that.....


edit on 17-12-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-12-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:30 PM
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reminds me of the phenomenon in the sierras in california that will knock small planes out of the sky with powerful down drafts. i wonder if they just happened to be in a microburst.the part about the engines not reaching max torque for so long is quite odd though but then again im no pilot
edit on 17-12-2017 by TheScale because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:32 PM
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I live south of that area and flying in that area can be risky for any plane.

The Sierra wave is bad in that area on many days.

Most smart pilots do not fly small planes along that side of the Sierras if they see the sierra wave lenticular clouds forming.

Up and downdrafts in a strong lee wave often rise and fall 2000 feet per minute and sometimes exceed 4000 feet per minute.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
with no approach direction choice usually

we end up with a 25 knot tail wind and it's not inherently safe therefore yezz......and then why

are the high aspect wings,,,,,long and skinny suckers,,,,,allowed....it's like having two wings then one at speed and a tricky one on approach when icing....DC-3 wouldn't do that.....



IQ test...hmm, I know zip, but I think your right. A DC-3 would never recover and 52 souls would have been toast.
edit on 17-12-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: silo13

A lot of people that study aviation enjoy studying incidents like this. It's a learning experience and it's interesting to r see what went right, and what went wrong. Nothing more than that. There doesn't always have to be anything more than that.
edit on 12/17/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


ebay went right


I got lost on that one.

Ebay?



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: silo13

Auto correct. What.

Fixed.
edit on 12/17/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

ewww windshear, luckily it hit them up high.




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