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Driverless cars and snow

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posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: Azureblue

They will probably be less effective than humans in rare circumstances, but more effective and moreover faster than humans on more common circumstances, resulting in overall higher safety. Additionally they will have sensors humans don't have, like lidar and radar---they will be much better in darkness and heavy rain where optical visibility is poor. A dark moose on the highway will be picked up earlier.

Additionally they may eventually be able to tell if they are in a common circumstance or not, and if they don't understand what is happening (i.e. outside training parameters & recognition) the vehicles will likely try to slow to safer limits and inform a human, locally, or remotely. I can bet there will be video call centers of people to help automated taxis negotiate unexpected roadworks and help train the next generation of neural networks.

Even today, Tesla Autopilot is being recognized by insurance companies as resulting in fewer claims---hard numbers vs supposition on the bulletin boards.

www.foxbusiness.com...


edit on 16-12-2017 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Great point, if I may add, wouldn't it need to happen once to the ai's? then proper coding etc or w/e will make it so?



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 06:07 PM
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Your car will have communicated with your neighbors car and know about the dangerous turn long before your even driving on the street.



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel
a reply to: Azureblue

They will probably be less effective than humans in rare circumstances, but more effective and moreover faster than humans on more common circumstances, resulting in overall higher safety. Additionally they will have sensors humans don't have, like lidar and radar---they will be much better in darkness and heavy rain where optical visibility is poor. A dark moose on the highway will be picked up earlier.

Additionally they may eventually be able to tell if they are in a common circumstance or not, and if they don't understand what is happening (i.e. outside training parameters & recognition) the vehicles will likely try to slow to safer limits and inform a human, locally, or remotely. I can bet there will be video call centers of people to help automated taxis negotiate unexpected roadworks and help train the next generation of neural networks.

Even today, Tesla Autopilot is being recognized by insurance companies as resulting in fewer claims---hard numbers vs supposition on the bulletin boards.

www.foxbusiness.com...



From the article: "While the discount and number of cars affected is small, the program is designed to help Direct Line learn about the habits of drivers with the semi-autonomous technology onboard."

Meaning, they don't actually have statistically significant data to make an actuarial decision on whether the systems are safer, so they're offering discounts to encourage people to engage in behavior to help create that data. Also note that it's on "semi autonomous" systems, ie interactive steering and braking; not fully autonomous as the OP posted.

And on top of that, every auto maker's systems will be different thus likely resulting in statistically different accident rates.

It's not as easy as the propaganda makes it seem.
edit on 16-12-2017 by LanceCorvette because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:11 AM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
My neighbor was driving in our small neighborhood she was going around a turn, which happened to be covered in fresh ice, her minivan slid and ended up stuck in her front yard. I saw this and avoided the curve as I could tell by the snow marks what had happened.

How on earth will driverless cars make those kinds of decisions? Will there just be a big o'l pile of cars in her front yard?

There are so many nuances to driving in our area, deer jutting out at you, farm animals, very slippery hills, logs falling on roads.
I just can't see driverless cars in these areas, maybe highway, but these backroads seem to need instant human decision making.



So, it's obvious some things have to change and some things need to stay the same with self-driving vehicles.

First of all, the roads need to be rebuilt, and everything else around them for the cars to truly work as they should wherever they go. For this reason, there will be automatic and manual driver control and it will stay this way. People who get drunk and want to go home won't need the manual control and will prefer auto, but people who need more control over their cars will choose manual and that system will completely override the automatic systems.

It's a simple switch, like putting a car in 4WD almost.

The car will have satelitte GPS so it will have up-to-date information on road conditions, weather patterns, and probably if there has been snow, the car's navigation will alert your phone at the appropriate time to leave home to get to your destination on time if you will be driving slowly.

You will not hit objects in the road with the help of sensors.

This is why building the roads and housing estates and parking near schools from the ground up and having new lights installed is imperative for the full benefits of self-driving cars. There will be leeway built in to support the car stopping when the sensor detects something in its distance parameters. Your car will stop before it hits a child and in fact, the car will alert you when it spots an anomaly heading toward you.

If you re-read your first paragraph, you will see that this is the reason why self-driving could be helpful. It alerts the driver to the conditions, the cars will be superior and have more safety controls. There will be less user error.

The instant human decision making will always be needed and this is why the self-driving cars will be able to be switched from self-driving to manual operation. There will always be a steering wheel that will rotate when in self-driving mode. It will be impossible to be arrested for speeding if your car is in self-driving mode--even if your car goes slightly faster downhill. Authorities will try to get more people to use the self-driving function and it will result in less deaths.

The biggest fight will occur over the data. Whoever collects all the data about people and where they go and what they do, and the entertainment they watch while driving. You can watch a football game that you missed while going for a long drive. Whoever controls this tech will have the world's data about people.

edit on 17-12-2017 by pacific because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:36 AM
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originally posted by: Azureblue
a reply to: JAGStorm

Can driverless cars see blocks of wood on the road, can they see potholes and washaways? Do they brake when a dog or cat or child runs out onto the road?

Yes, they will stop with the help of their distance parameter sensors.

Do they detect something bad happening up ahead such as a car or truck turning sideways and starting to roll over towards the car?

Yes, the cars will have a computer that inputs instant road updates. But the driver can always switch to manual operation so there is no fear. A self-driving truck or car won't turn sideways in automatic mode.

Can they sense and brake or take other evasive action when something happens up ahead or when someone throws something at it from a bridge or whatever?

The roads will be built differently, but there will be warning systems in place with the help of the sensors who sense matter coming towards it. Understand that the cars will be different, they'll be safer. They won't be bulletproof, though, for the regular person.

Can they be made to stop when someone in the car is absolutely busting to go to the toilet on the side of road or wants to stop so they can spew their heart out because they have motion sickness?

All self-driving cars will have voice control and it will be a point of perfection whereas all other voice control kinda sucks. It will be sophisticated and all locks, controls, weather, maps, air con etc can be controlled by voice. No doubt there will be a signal first, like "Command . . . I feel sick, pull over and open the driver's side door." This still will only respond to who the drivers want to be input into the system. If a school bus driver had a heart attack, and the bus didn't reach its destination on time, then the bus would be re-routed back to the depot after a call to the school etc. So like I said, things have to be different first.






I just wanted to answer a few of your queries.



posted on Dec, 17 2017 @ 06:45 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Mandroid7

Uh no they are all being addressed..


Ok, how did they address this scenario:

I'm driving on a residential two-lane road. They are doing some road work that is making my lane impassable, so a flagger holds out a flag to stop me. I know that the flag means stop, so I do. A flagger on the other side of the obstacle is waving his flag, telling the oncoming traffic (relative to me) to proceed. At some point, that other flagger stops the oncoming traffic, and my flagger sees the traffic had stopped (as do I) and waves his flag telling me to use the other lane to proceed around the road work.

Now, that's simple for me to do, but can a driverless car do that right now? Does the technology currently understand when the flagger signals me to proceed around the road work? Or would it (a) just sit there after the flagger signals me to proceed, or worse (b) attempt to go around "the obstacle" (the flagger) while the flagger is signaling me to stop?

I suppose that someday all construction workers will have the technology built into their flags (or whatever) to communicate with the driverless car, but we are talking about "right now". "Right now" would the driverless car know what to do?

I truly think we are headed towards driverless cars in the not-too-distant future, and those cars will in fact make auto transporation very very safe. However, I don't think that system is ready right now, even if every car was driverless.





I don't know if self-driving cars are ready for that right now.

But there will be sensors in whatever the traffic crew hold up that alert the sensors in your car to stop. It will do so. The minute the crew get to work, they'll update an online system that will instantly let you know the moment you get into your car that there are roadworks. You will take a different direction.

If that is impossible, your car will still stop even without a sensor embedded in a sign. The moment your car senses a person in the middle of the road, your car will stop. You have the option of voice control also. Not to mention switching from auto to manual operation.

Most likely, you'd just go another route. If the Internet is down, then you still have the options of the sensors detecting matter (person), and the sign, voice control and manual mode.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 01:59 AM
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originally posted by: pacific

originally posted by: Azureblue
a reply to: JAGStorm

Can driverless cars see blocks of wood on the road, can they see potholes and washaways? Do they brake when a dog or cat or child runs out onto the road?

Yes, they will stop with the help of their distance parameter sensors.

Do they detect something bad happening up ahead such as a car or truck turning sideways and starting to roll over towards the car?

Yes, the cars will have a computer that inputs instant road updates. But the driver can always switch to manual operation so there is no fear. A self-driving truck or car won't turn sideways in automatic mode.

Can they sense and brake or take other evasive action when something happens up ahead or when someone throws something at it from a bridge or whatever?

The roads will be built differently, but there will be warning systems in place with the help of the sensors who sense matter coming towards it. Understand that the cars will be different, they'll be safer. They won't be bulletproof, though, for the regular person.

Can they be made to stop when someone in the car is absolutely busting to go to the toilet on the side of road or wants to stop so they can spew their heart out because they have motion sickness?

All self-driving cars will have voice control and it will be a point of perfection whereas all other voice control kinda sucks. It will be sophisticated and all locks, controls, weather, maps, air con etc can be controlled by voice. No doubt there will be a signal first, like "Command . . . I feel sick, pull over and open the driver's side door." This still will only respond to who the drivers want to be input into the system. If a school bus driver had a heart attack, and the bus didn't reach its destination on time, then the bus would be re-routed back to the depot after a call to the school etc. So like I said, things have to be different first.






I just wanted to answer a few of your queries.


Thanks for that, I've been wondering about what the story is.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Obstacle avoidance may help , but driverless cars are still a concern.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: luthier

You know, people pose this question as though it will be a great moral dilemma that programmers have to make. I say just make it an option during the setup.







 
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