It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Driverless cars and snow

page: 4
10
<< 1  2  3    5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:09 PM
link   
a reply to: luthier

Sounds more like you are having a nerdgasm for technology, and want it implemented before any of these scenarios are addressed.

The road isn't friendly to 80 mph computer glitches or miscalculating escape routes.




posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:11 PM
link   
a reply to: Mandroid7

Uh no they are all being addressed..

The road isn't friendly now.

Drivers kill lots of other drivers.

I am.just practical. It's obviously safer once the technology has been vetted.

You assume it isn't. It is



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:17 PM
link   
a reply to: Mandroid7
More humans will die from human operator error, in the next day, then all of the humans killed by all of the autonomous vehicles ever produced, since their inception.

If we are going to play the mitigation game, the sooner humans are denied control, the better. Even the flawed computer systems have proven to be magnitudes safer then we will ever be.



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mandroid7
a reply to: luthier

Car is driving, kid pulls out, motorcycle next to car, distance closer than brakes can stop, no escape route because of parked cars. Which target does the car hit?


most people cant even make that decision today

.it would likely put on it brakes as best as it can since both targets are non vehicles and individuals then calculate the best path as possible. however not all accidents are avoidable not even for computers.



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:26 PM
link   
a reply to: luthier

You really aren't in a position to say that all scenarios are being addressed.

Waaaaaaay too many variables on the road.

This ice one is a good one. The communication to other cars is based off of the sacrifice of the first car.

How about rural untraveled roads? What about frozen bridges?
How about controlling your slide in the last minute in a ditch, to avoid a tree?
How about taking a corner on the outside of a guy on the road, instead of "slide controlling" right into him?



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:35 PM
link   
a reply to: Mandroid7

Again do some research on how they are developing and get some physics in your toolbag.

Most drivers fail at those situations.

You fail to mention the amount of drunk or distracted drivers it would save.

Again. The system uses sonor, lasers, radar, stereo cameras, gps and response sensors,..you use your eyes.

It can "see" things you can't.
edit on 15-12-2017 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:37 PM
link   
a reply to: peck420

Why would that not be the math?
How many are on the road?

I've haven't crashed a car in 26 years, you want to put them up against my record, and put your money where your mouth is?

I will always side with human control of travel.

Maybe I will divert the world from this creepy Taco Bell Demolition Man world they all seek so much?



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:45 PM
link   
On the other hand, driverless cars are a lot less likely to make mistakes because they're late for an appointment and want to speed through traffic and bad weather.

The question that I have is if a driverless car cuts me off in traffic, who am I supposed to flip off?



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Mandroid7

Uh no they are all being addressed..


Ok, how did they address this scenario:

I'm driving on a residential two-lane road. They are doing some road work that is making my lane impassable, so a flagger holds out a flag to stop me. I know that the flag means stop, so I do. A flagger on the other side of the obstacle is waving his flag, telling the oncoming traffic (relative to me) to proceed. At some point, that other flagger stops the oncoming traffic, and my flagger sees the traffic had stopped (as do I) and waves his flag telling me to use the other lane to proceed around the road work.

Now, that's simple for me to do, but can a driverless car do that right now? Does the technology currently understand when the flagger signals me to proceed around the road work? Or would it (a) just sit there after the flagger signals me to proceed, or worse (b) attempt to go around "the obstacle" (the flagger) while the flagger is signaling me to stop?

I suppose that someday all construction workers will have the technology built into their flags (or whatever) to communicate with the driverless car, but we are talking about "right now". "Right now" would the driverless car know what to do?

I truly think we are headed towards driverless cars in the not-too-distant future, and those cars will in fact make auto transporation very very safe. However, I don't think that system is ready right now, even if every car was driverless.




edit on 15/12/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:55 PM
link   
a reply to: Mandroid7
Laughable.

Your anecdotal evidence pales in the reality of the current data.

Human fatalities from autonomous: 1/140+ million miles. (Just Tesla vehicles, if we include all autonomous it is closer to 1/200+million miles. I have ignored their data as it is not for consumer sale yet.)
Human fatalities from human: 1/94 million miles.

The current semi-autonomous vehicles are 50% (48.9 if you want to get all technical) safer then the human operators.

Ironically...the human operator was at fault for the sole semi-autonomous fatality.



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:56 PM
link   
a reply to: peck420

Have you ever used a computer, they do funky stuff all the time! Even systems that aren't designed to ever have problems have problems. I am in no way anti-technology but I guess I fear being the first ones to test this stuff out.



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Mandroid7

Uh no they are all being addressed..


Ok, how did they address this scenario:

I'm driving on a residential two-lane road. They are doing some road work that is making my lane impassable, so a flagger holds out a flag to stop me. I know that the flag means stop, so I do. A flagger on the other side of the obstacle is waving his flag, telling the oncoming traffic (relative to me) to proceed. At some point, that other flagger stops the oncoming traffic, and my flagger sees the traffic had stopped (as do I) and waves his flag telling me to use the other lane to proceed around the road work.

Now, that's simple for me to do, but can a driverless car do that right now? Does the technology currently understand when the flagger signals me to proceed around the road work? Or would it (a) just sit there after the flagger signals me to proceed, or worse (b) attempt to go around "the obstacle" (the flagger) while the flagger is signaling me to stop?

I suppose that someday all construction workers will have the technology built into their flags (or whatever) to communicate with the driverless car, but we are talking about "right now". "Right now" would the driverless car know what to do?

I truly think we are headed towards driverless cars in the not-too-distant future, and those cars will in fact make auto transporation very very safe. However, I don't think that system is ready right now, even if every car was driverless.





You answered your own question. They could also program the work site into the GPS or have the sensors in the work vehicles.

The most dangerous time will be when humans and self driving cars are both in the road.

If all cars are self driving they will also communicate with each other.

I personally find it creepy and wI'll miss driving.

On the other hand not being rear ended at a stop light or hit by drunk drivers is nice.



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 03:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: peck420

Have you ever used a computer, they do funky stuff all the time! Even systems that aren't designed to ever have problems have problems. I am in no way anti-technology but I guess I fear being the first ones to test this stuff out.



Have you ever heard of a drunk driver or texter killing someone?



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:01 PM
link   
a reply to: JAGStorm
You might want to stop driving already.

Unless your car is 30 years old, you have been relying on a computer for your daily drive already. Dead yet?



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:03 PM
link   
So will the blinkers be automatic?? Could be a major improvement there.





posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:07 PM
link   
a reply to: luthier

I'm sure that "someday" there will be GPS/electronics in a construction worker's flag. However, that's most likely not happening anytime real soon, especially for many small companies who might need to stop traffic -- such as a small-business landscaper who might be using a small bulldozer, or maybe a small-time business who is doing some tree-cutting along the road.

Those small businesses will take a while to be able to purchase the equipment necessary to communicate their partial lane-closing intentions to driverless cars.

Like I said, it will someday happen, and we will all be safer for it, but it's not by no means something that will happen soon.



edit on 15/12/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Mandroid7

Uh no they are all being addressed..


Ok, how did they address this scenario:

I'm driving on a residential two-lane road. They are doing some road work that is making my lane impassable, so a flagger holds out a flag to stop me. I know that the flag means stop, so I do. A flagger on the other side of the obstacle is waving his flag, telling the oncoming traffic (relative to me) to proceed. At some point, that other flagger stops the oncoming traffic, and my flagger sees the traffic had stopped (as do I) and waves his flag telling me to use the other lane to proceed around the road work.

Now, that's simple for me to do, but can a driverless car do that right now? Does the technology currently understand when the flagger signals me to proceed around the road work? Or would it (a) just sit there after the flagger signals me to proceed, or worse (b) attempt to go around "the obstacle" (the flagger) while the flagger is signaling me to stop?

I suppose that someday all construction workers will have the technology built into their flags (or whatever) to communicate with the driverless car, but we are talking about "right now". "Right now" would the driverless car know what to do?

I truly think we are headed towards driverless cars in the not-too-distant future, and those cars will in fact make auto transporation very very safe. However, I don't think that system is ready right now, even if every car was driverless.





I don't think we will ever get to completely autonomous driving in our lifetime where people are being chauffered in back taking a nap. There are way too many variables and AI is a long way off from dealing with those scenarios. With that said, I do think there are situations were autonomous vehicles most definitely be used. The issue is that a human will always need to be able to take over.

The current tech seems to work well on the highway where there is little interference but even then there are situatons where the AI simply can't "read the road" requiring a human driver.

Here is a video of a Tesla hitting a wall because the dumb driver didn't take over going through a construction site.


edit on 15-12-2017 by Edumakated because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

It will happen in my lifetime and I am 40. Probably in cities in Europe first with roads designated only for self driving cars if I was to crystal ball it



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: Daalder
LIDAR in combination with machine learning will avoid any of these obstacles.
Once one car sees that pile of snow it will recognize it, informing itself and every other car in the vicinity.
Same goes for slippery roads, detected by your ABS system. Once detected every car knows at what time, under weatherconditions and where it is slippery. Every other car will tap into that information instantly when approaching such road and conditions and act accordingly.

That's how these cars are being developed.
You can look it up.


More importantly, the government will pass a law requiring all cars be "networked", so that the cars will "talk to each other" and inform each other on the road conditions they've just seen. So, the car in front of you will tell your car to watch for slippery ice etc..before your car's own senses get to the location to detect it.

Hence, not only will automobiles have many more "sensors" to detect environment conditions, way beyond human eyesight, like radar, temp sensors, chemical sensors, infra red sensors, etc..,but each car will be able to access the sensor data from all the cars in it's immediate neighborhood, thus vastly expanding the sensory input available to make good decisions.



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 04:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: peck420

Ironically...the human operator was at fault for the sole semi-autonomous fatality.



The fatality occurred because the Tesla car "viewed" the truck crossing at the top of a hill on the horizon line, but failed to "see" it because it mistook the white truck to be part of the sky -- i.e., it didn't notice the truck. That was the ultimate cause -- that and the occupant wasn't paying attention to what his car was doing. However, I think the ultimate goal of autonomous driving systems is that occupants should not need to pay attention, but just sit back and passively be driven by the autonomous car.

Obviously if ALL vehicles were completely automated and talking to each other, this accident would not have happened (the truck would have told the car it was there). However, this incident points out that even a computer system is not infallible.

Autonomous driving will in fact be much much safer, but let's not kid ourselves that only human drivers make mistakes.

edit on 15/12/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
10
<< 1  2  3    5  6 >>

log in

join