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Why is one religion any better than any other

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posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

No religion is better than any other. Now they may be a better fit for individuals , but none are superior.




posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 06:05 PM
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IDK guys the cult I've been working on is pretty #ING awesome!!!



posted on Dec, 15 2017 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: BELIEVERpriest
a reply to: madmac5150

Seek and you shall find. Ask and you shall receive.

You wont find anything if you're not looking for it.


Then perhaps if one stops seeking, stops asking, and stops looking: they could find nothing?

No one will find nothing.
And he said, Thou canst not see my face: for there shall no man see me, and live. Exodus 33:20


Agreed: nothing to find, and no one to find it.
No it.
No god.
Nobody to find god.
Just some other sparks, in this field of consciousness, having wild fantasies about gods and religions.



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 03:41 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Raggedyman
Jesus taught love, even those we should hate
That is not logical

Do you want to be content and at peace or do you want to be full of hate?
Unless you forgive you cannot be full of love.
It is pretty logical.


No it's not logical, outside of faith in Jesus, Christianity is completely absurd and stupid
It's a simple and direct question, what value is Christianity without Christ

Forget Jesus and forget all religion.
Do you want to be full of hate?



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

It's a simple and direct question, what value is Christianity without Christ

Does Christ or Christianity have any value at all?
Are they not just concepts, ideas, words?

What is there really? Where do concepts appear? How do concepts appear? Can any concept appear outside of the non conceptual?



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 09:07 AM
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originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Raggedyman
Jesus taught love, even those we should hate
That is not logical

Do you want to be content and at peace or do you want to be full of hate?
Unless you forgive you cannot be full of love.
It is pretty logical.


No it's not logical, outside of faith in Jesus, Christianity is completely absurd and stupid
It's a simple and direct question, what value is Christianity without Christ

Forget Jesus and forget all religion.
Do you want to be full of hate?


Some people do choose that course
Some people prefer the ease of hate and anger over working on love and forgiveness

Like it or not, they do



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 09:11 AM
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originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Raggedyman

It's a simple and direct question, what value is Christianity without Christ

Does Christ or Christianity have any value at all?
Are they not just concepts, ideas, words?

What is there really? Where do concepts appear? How do concepts appear? Can any concept appear outside of the non conceptual?


Christ and His faith has value to those who choose to invest their lives into it
Otherwise, people see it as foolish

Concepts appear as the individual chooses how they manifest the concept, free will, it's their choice

Many see Christianity as absurd, many don't believe in Christ

Christianity only has value if a person chooses it



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: DeathSlayer
Allah Moon God
..
Is Allah the God of the Bible, or is Allah the moon god of ancient Arabia?



Well, here is some interesting contrasts:

God of the Bible has "a son", but "no daughters".
Allah has "daughters" but no "son".

Now, even more interesting, is that the Bible describes the "chief vampire" as having "two daughters"



The horseleach hath two daughters, crying, Give, give. There are three things that are never satisfied, yea, four things say not, It is enough: -- KJV, Proverbs 30:15


So, is Allah the chief blood sucking vampire? That would make him the Devil, wouldn't it? The opposite of God.

In some parts of the world Muslim Governments have banned Christians from using the word "Allah" to refer to "their Christian God".

Malaysia court rules non-Muslims cannot use 'Allah'

Muslims also have a popular saying, "There is no God, but Allah."

Which has an obvious interpretation: "There is no God, but there is Allah."

That is, they deny the existence of God, and assert only Allah exists.

So, in Islam, God and Allah are two distinct beings. To the Muslim, God is just a figment of man's imagination, but Allah is "real".

Now, for a Christian, anyone who would "deny" the existence of God, belongs to the anti-christ.

This is stated quite clearly in the scriptures,



And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God: and this is that spirit of antichrist, whereof ye have heard that it should come; and even now already is it in the world. -- KJV, 1 John 4:3


Muslims say Jesus was just a Prophet. They deny Jesus was Christ come in the flesh.

Which makes sense, since Muslims deny the existence of God, they couldn't accept God would have a Son who came in the flesh. So, they have to make Jesus an ordinary Prophet. Just a man with a message. Otherwise, they'd have to explain whose "son" he was. Since, Allah only has "daughters" and "no son", Jesus can't be Allah's son. Both Christians and Muslims would agree on that particular point. And since God doesn't exist, for the Muslim, Jesus can't be God's son, either.

So, that makes it clear that Allah is the god of darkness, the same chief horseleach with two daughters that the bible describes in the scriptures.

Interesting, Jesus describes this dark god as a murderer, and what is the principle operating tactic of the Islamic Extremists? You guessed it, murder of the innocents, which we call terrorism today. It all fits with the scriptures.



Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your father ye will do. He was a murderer from the beginning, and abode not in
the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he speaketh a lie, he speaketh of his own: for he is a liar, and the father of it.
-- KJV, John 8:44


What is interesting here, is Jesus is basically saying that to the Jews, that Allah is their father.


edit on 16-12-2017 by AMPTAH because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2017 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Thinking over the thread, perhaps the belief in a judgment day can be considered an axiom in different belief systems?



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 12:18 AM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: dfnj2015

No religion is better than any other. Now they may be a better fit for individuals , but none are superior.



You completely miss the point of the thread. It's not about which religion is better. It's about why do you choose to have the belief system you do with regards to religion or non-religion. This thread is how people decide which personal dogma is better than any other. But most people posting here just want to be the typical noise argumentative type posts.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 12:20 AM
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originally posted by: dffrntkndfnml
a reply to: dfnj2015

Thinking over the thread, perhaps the belief in a judgment day can be considered an axiom in different belief systems?


Yes, you are catching on to what I am driving at. If person believes judgment day is real, I have no problem with that. But it is an assumption or something taken to be true without any evidence support the belief. It is clearly an axiom of a belief system. One you have identified the axiom, the next question is why are you choosing the belief judgment day is real. You could say because the Bible says so and the Bible is absolute truth (or at least the parts most people accept as being absolute truth). This is what I want to figure out. How people decide.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH
Now, for a Christian, anyone who would "deny" the existence of God, belongs to the anti-christ.
This is stated quite clearly in the scriptures,


And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God: and this is that spirit of antichrist, whereof ye have heard that it should come; and even now already is it in the world. -- KJV, 1 John 4:3

Muslims say Jesus was just a Prophet. They deny Jesus was Christ come in the flesh.


I'm not sure I agree with your interpretation. I'm not sure if "every spirit" refers to every person in a clear sense. It's a strangely worded translation. I think the sentiment being conveyed is when people follow the teachings of Christ, it's as if Christ is manifesting the World in the flesh. If people ignore the teachings of Christ, then they are obvious with some other spirit of being that may be anti-Christ's teachings or not aligned with them semantically.

Blessed on the linguists!

Beatitudes teachings of Jesus:



"Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who mourn,
for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek,
for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness,
for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are the merciful,
for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure of heart,
for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they shall be called children of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven."



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 12:39 AM
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originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Raggedyman

It's a simple and direct question, what value is Christianity without Christ

Does Christ or Christianity have any value at all?
Are they not just concepts, ideas, words?

What is there really? Where do concepts appear? How do concepts appear? Can any concept appear outside of the non conceptual?


There are four great existential questions:

1. Who am I ?
2. Why am I here ?
3. What does it all mean ?
4. Where do I go when I die ?

Many philosophers and wise men say these are unanswerable questions. But many people feel very uncomfortable with unanswerable questions. So in order to get past the unknowing, people invent religion to provide a context and a map for how these questions are to be answered.

In the Power of Myth series with where Bill Moyers spends hours interviewing Joseph Campbell who was a scholar in comparative religion studies, Bill asks Joseph Campbell about what happens to you when you die. Joseph Campbell provides a really amazingly profound answer to the question. The way Joseph Campbell talks about comparative religion will answer some of your question.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Thank you, dfnj2015. I was wondering wether axioms or the advantages of different belief systems were your intended focus of the thread.

I find the concept of Judgement Day appeals to me on a variety of levels.

From without, this belief is held mostly by the Abrahamic Faiths.I'm most familier with the contempary Christian perspective on this, though it is found in Hebrew and Islamic lines of thought.I tend to picture it personally as the time when my heart will be weighed against a feather.

The way it's described in Revelation makes sense too, though a collective judgement of the living and the dead feels more distant then my own demise.I'm not as familier with Eastern thought on the topic, I tend to imagine that a judgement day or sizing up of one's life would be a natural part of spiritual growth in the context of reincarnation.

The concept of life review, and other's recounting experiences where their life flashes before their eyes tends to suggest there may be something to it.It's difficult to avoid holding back judgements when reminiscing about the past and how the choices one makes, tie into the present.

From within, the belief reminds me of some of the experiences I have had on my spiritual journey.I view religion and spirituality as a tool for personal developement. Hopefully, the virtues one cultivates while getting to know themselves better will lead them down the path of self realization.

The Ten Commandments and even moreso, the Golden Rule appear to me as guidelines to the practice of due diligence for the time the walls come down and someone really sees their own reflection in another's eyes.(Again, for the first time)

The concept of Judgement Day seems worthy or fit to me to encourage the practice of more thoughtful behaviour, and playing a long game.I think that the concept of Judgment Day is similar to Pascal's wager in that the benefits would outweigh the drawbacks of life lived more consciously striving to be the best one can practice being.

More reflection on my part is needed to come up with some math for this.Off hand, the I look at the wisdom gained from spiritual growth similar to the financial gain in the Saint Pertersburg Paradox...



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 02:34 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015

originally posted by: Itisnowagain

originally posted by: Raggedyman

It's a simple and direct question, what value is Christianity without Christ

Does Christ or Christianity have any value at all?
Are they not just concepts, ideas, words?

What is there really? Where do concepts appear? How do concepts appear? Can any concept appear outside of the non conceptual?


There are four great existential questions:

1. Who am I ?
2. Why am I here ?
3. What does it all mean ?
4. Where do I go when I die ?

Many philosophers and wise men say these are unanswerable questions. But many people feel very uncomfortable with unanswerable questions. So in order to get past the unknowing, people invent religion to provide a context and a map for how these questions are to be answered.

In the Power of Myth series with where Bill Moyers spends hours interviewing Joseph Campbell who was a scholar in comparative religion studies, Bill asks Joseph Campbell about what happens to you when you die. Joseph Campbell provides a really amazingly profound answer to the question. The way Joseph Campbell talks about comparative religion will answer some of your question.




Lets call them philosophical questions, they are not existential questions
Existentialism is about existence, experience, different branch of philosophy altogether



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
The way Joseph Campbell talks about comparative religion will answer some of your question.

I was not looking for answers to the questions.
The reply was to Raggedyman - so the questions were for him/her to consider.
edit on 18-12-2017 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 07:38 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
1. Who am I ?
I am is not a who.

2. Why am I here ?
I am not here.

3. What does it all mean ?
What does 'what' mean?

4. Where do I go when I die ?
Nowhere - I am nowhere now.

'Who' wants to know 'What'?


edit on 18-12-2017 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 10:24 AM
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" My God is bigger then yours!"

As Satan would say, sounds like some one trying to compensate for something. Maybe it male thing...o wait, human thing.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
But many people feel very uncomfortable with unanswerable questions. So in order to get past the unknowing, people invent religion to provide a context and a map for how these questions are to be answered.



Here's the problem I have with the idea that people invented religion.

First of all, I was born into this world and found out about religion.

So, in this life I didn't invent it.

That is, religion wasn't invented by "me" here and now.

Secondly, when I read about the history of religion, I find that the religious knowledge used to be "restricted" to a small group of people called "priests".

It's only a very modern phenomenon, that religion is seemingly open to everybody, and we can all pour over and read the scriptures of this and that religion.

This tells me, that at the inception, when religions "came into being" it wasn't intended for "all people."

Rather, it was specialized knowledge intended for just a handful of folks.

Many parts of the Holy Bible, for example, are written as if directed to just one guy, the "King" of a nation.

So, certainly, the King, his Royal family, and the Priesthood, all had access to the scriptures throughout history, but the common man in the street only got to know, or rather access to read the text, very recently.

The religious texts were even written deliberately in an obscure language, like Latin, to prevent the ordinary person from being able to read the information contained therein. Prior to that, only a few people could even read and write any language at all, so there wasn't even a need for a special obscure language to protect the text from ordinary eyes. And again, much of the scriptures are written in "parables" and "dark sayings" that require interpretation, so once again, this religious knowledge is restricted, even when you can read the words.

So, what's going on here?

If man created religion, say to control the masses, shouldn't the text be clear and simple, and have always been made available to all?

I mean, when you want someone to do, what you want them to do, you don't use "parables" and "metaphors" to give them "instruction."

So I reject the idea that religion is invented by man to control the masses and keep them in check.

Instead, I see religion as a way of "keeping time", by way of maintaining a record of historical events, not necessarily with precise historical accuracy, but with sufficient accuracy to enable one to discern that there are "time cycles" involved in human affairs, and containing various instructions, we'd call knowledge and wisdom, about how to conduct one's life in reaction to the cyclical environmental changes.

Religion has two great "pillars":

1) the calendar
2) food

All religions have some repeating rituals to mark time points on some calendar, reminding us that things "repeat."

All religions have detailed restrictions on what we should or should not eat. The food here, encompasses all the things we "feed to our six senses", of which the food we put into our mouths is but an illustrative example.
The six senses: touch, taste, hear, think, see, and smell.

Religions differ on the particulars, but all contain that same central theme: there are things you can touch, other things you must not touch, you can taste some things, but avoid others, you can listen to some types of sounds, but shun other types of music etc.., you are to think of certain things...especially on certain days..like Sabbath or Sunday..etc..and avoid thoughts of other things...you can look at certain things...but avoid looking at others..like naked women...etc..and you can smell some odors...but avoid the smell of sulfur and brimstone etc..Whatever the particular religion picks and selects, it has a plan of conduct for the follower when dealing with food.

So now, the knowledge contained in these two "pillars", about the calendar and the food, are of such a nature, so detailed and comprehensive, that they could not be all determined and established within the lifespan of a single person. So, then we are left with the idea that man must have "gradually acquired" this knowledge over a long period of time, or that some "very highly evolved being" that knew all these things simply gave man the instructions at some point in history.

However we look at it, religion is something given to us, by some being or collection of beings, rather than something we just made up on our own.

When we make up our own system of principles and truths, we call it "Philosophy".
It's philosophy, because it's man made, and we get to decide the truths in the system.

When we are given the system, we call it "Religion".
It's religion, because we don't know all the things, we didn't create it, it was just handed to us, and we have to accept it contains righteous principles and truths, on "faith."
With religion, we don't expect to be able to prove all things in the system.
Instead, we have to wait, for the events to occur that would enable us to understand the meaning of parts of the system.
We sort of "discover", bit by bit, as we go along, how much of it is "truth."

With Philosophy, everything is true, by definition, because we are the creators of that system.

With Religion, everything is in doubt, until life experience reveals that relevant part as being truth to us.



posted on Dec, 18 2017 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Actually neighbour I don't miss it. You may not like my answer, but it answers the question you started with. Beyond that its all hand waving




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