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Pros and cons to veterans ID cards?

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CX

posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 05:01 AM
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Hi all,

I'm curious about the latest proposals here in the UK to issue ID cards to armed forces veterans proving their service. Driving licences will have a "V" stamped on them, and ID cards for those who don't drive.

www.bbc.co.uk...

As an ex member of the forces myself, to be honest the first thing that came into my head was the security aspect. I don't want everyone knowing I was ex forces. If it comes up in conversation, then fair enough, however it's at my discretion.

I can see the positive sides of it, there are many services and retail offers that are available to veterans, but I also can't help thinking about being forced to reveal your service history.

A card revealing certain medals I was awarded will indicate places I served. If I'm stopped by a police officer who either doesn't like armed forces or has an issue with where I served....that could be an issue. Maybe I'm thinking too much into it. I guess it would help minimise the incidents of stolen valour.

Just thinking aloud, and would welcome your options, especially those in the US who already have these.

Thanks.

CX.
edit on 14/12/17 by CX because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 06:17 AM
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It would make it bit easier to know those who actually served as opposed to the wannabe heroes who claim they served .

Though do agree with you on the privacy aspect of it .



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 06:39 AM
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originally posted by: VengefulGhost
It would make it bit easier to know those who actually served as opposed to the wannabe heroes who claim they served .

Though do agree with you on the privacy aspect of it .


Stolen valor can be easily spotted even without a “V” on whatever card.

As an ex service person I hate that we have to identify ourselves yet again!
edit on 14-12-2017 by Lagomorphe because: We have MOD numbers for that!



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: CX

Not a former Soldier or owt, and i think it a bit clumsy to enable this by ammending the driver's license.

I really dont know if such ID is really needed but sure dont object especially if it improves access to targeted services and discounts.

I would have thought voluntary enrollment to an accredited id card would be a neater and more discreet/considerate method though.

Eta. Is stolen valour much of thing here in the UK? Besides the SAS of course!
edit on 14-12-2017 by skalla because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 08:41 AM
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a reply to: CX

I have it on my state drivers license, but I had to show my DD214 to get it.



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: CX

Here in the State's saying you are either current or prior military is a ticket to savings town. While serving I was pretty much ALWAYS bumped up to first class while flying on commercial air lines for instance. Heck you bring up police officers getting upset, here in the States you are likely to get OFF the ticket for being in the military. I've talked to military people saying they got warnings on tickets going 100 mph on the highway before just because they were military.

I can't say how things are across the pond, but that's how things tend to work here. Discrimination against military personal is kind of frowned upon after the Vietnam War.



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 12:11 PM
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my husband is active duty in the US, and he never brings it up voluntarily. i don't think he'd want this.

but krazyshot is correct, people knowing your military in the US generally gets you good things. discounts, favors, butt-kissing... idk how it is in the UK.


CX

posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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Thanks for the replies, here in the UK, I can imagine it being handy for quick proof, say if there were discounts in a shop or the likes.

Other things like financial assistance, or medical support, if requiring any proof of service, this usually isn't an on the spot thing, and it's not difficult to get your discharge book or proof of service from either the Veterans Agency or the Army Disablement place.

As for stolen valour here in the UK, I don't see it much myself apart from the odd case of a Walt saying they've done this and that in a bar. I know some get funny over that kind of thing, but if they aren't doing any harm, I just ignore it view it as a source of entertainment from someone who maybe admired the forces but couldn't get in for any reason. Hearing an exaggerated story about having been in every conflict going whilst serving at Hereford.....all in the three years service they did in total.....you have to smile at that.

When stolen valour makes its way onto a work resume however, that can be dangerous, and should be outed.

Best one I ever had was a guy who said he was a Royal Marine in the Falklands.....fair enough.....he then went on to say how he was later doing close protection for Charles and Diana.....and whilst driving them last the Iranian Embassy siege of 1980, Charles told him to take a shot at the terrorist leaning out of the window!

Great days


Thanks again for the replies, I think I have more conspiracy related concerns, like when we are eventually required to carry ID papers 24/7, and the fact that some vets could prove difficult for the government if not wanting to toe the line......I don't know....I'm just wary about telling everyone about what I did just for a few discounts here and there.

It's a nice thought, but like me, most soldiers I know don't expect special treatment over any other member of the public.

CX.

edit on 14/12/17 by CX because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: CX

I see your concerns, for sure. Here in the States, I live in Kentucky, and it's optional if we want to have it noted on our driver's license. I opted to have it noted, but where I live, there is a general mutual respect between law enforcement and military service members and veterans, so that aspect of it is relatively moot.

Plus, how often do you have to show your ID to people? It's a pretty rare occurrence for me over here, so do you need to use it more often over there to make it a noticeable problem?

I do believe that it should be optional though, regardless.

Thanks for your service, in any event.



posted on Dec, 14 2017 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: CX

Mine stays put away, and I don't visit VFW'S or any memorial day events. To much b.s. in this day and age.
I just want to be left alone at this point, do my work, & raise my kids in relative peace.




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