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Emirates A380 nearly crashed on approach to JFK

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posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:30 PM
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An Emirates A380 on final approach to JFK's runway 13L conducting a "Canarsie approach” dropped below the minimum 500 feet and bottomed out at 200 feet above the ground before executing a missed approach. The A380 landed safely after the go around. This is the second such incident in 3 months. Another Emirates A380 on approach to Moscow's Domodedovo airport dropped below minimums and had to go around as well.

We fly around in an EC-145 and everybody is responsible for safety. We get GCAS warnings find it hard to believe that there were no warnings in the cockpit. Seems like a breakdown in CRM on the part of the crews.


avherald.com...

www.airliners.net...
edit on 12/12/17 by FredT because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Here is you tube of the approach that the A380 flew. 200 feet is way way too low over structures

Also you can hear the altitude calls. In the EC-145 we get them starting at 500 feet




posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Are these the same outfit that ran a brand new one off of the runway into a wall because someone had disconnected some warning horns?



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: FredT

I've been saying for years now that we are in the downward swing of CRM. Everyone became incredibly aware of it after Tenerife, and they spent years building good CRM practices. Now, after years of not seeing anything even close to similar to that accident, crews are becoming complacent. We're going to see another bad accident before long.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: FredT

Are these the same outfit that ran a brand new one off of the runway into a wall because someone had disconnected some warning horns?


This is less about Airbus products and more about crew training and resource management in the cockpit IMHO
edit on 12/12/17 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:43 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: FredT

I've been saying for years now that we are in the downward swing of CRM. Everyone became incredibly aware of it after Tenerife, and they spent years building good CRM practices. Now, after years of not seeing anything even close to similar to that accident, crews are becoming complacent. We're going to see another bad accident before long.


Thats a shame because it works. Its our mantra in the air



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: FredT

It does. Good CRM has saved many an aircraft, but if you look back over the last couple of years, you can see how far we've gone backwards. So many accidents and near misses because someone didn't speak up, or recognize what they were seeing.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I have to be honest its way way too much reliance on automation IMHO



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Absolutely. Pilots are getting to the point where they almost can't actually fly anymore, they're trained to push buttons.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 10:26 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: FredT

Absolutely. Pilots are getting to the point where they almost can't actually fly anymore, they're trained to push buttons.


Yep, that proved itself with the Asiana crash. Seriously when we are on approach EVERYBODY is eyes out and paying attention. Even if the child we are transporting arrests, we are eyes out the final 2 minutes when on approach.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Which is how you need to be, especially in the last couple years. You aren't going to do your patient any good when that A330 or 767 that lined up for the wrong runway doesn't see you, and runs you over.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: FredT

Which is how you need to be, especially in the last couple years. You aren't going to do your patient any good when that A330 or 767 that lined up for the wrong runway doesn't see you, and runs you over.


Nah its the 757 you have to watch out for that wake turbulence is brutal. But in all honesty we are flying out of small fields and seldom if ever use one of the big fields (and only if the hospital does not have a pad or we are fixed wing) But flying over the center of the runway at SFO or SJC is always cool



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Yeah, the 757 wake turbulence is far beyond what it should be for an aircraft that size.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 06:44 AM
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originally posted by: FredT

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: FredT

Are these the same outfit that ran a brand new one off of the runway into a wall because someone had disconnected some warning horns?


This is less about Airbus products and more about crew training and resource management in the cockpit IMHO


I never implied any thing but what I said. Those breakers on that short trip didn't shut themselves off.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58



We're going to see another bad accident before long.


Yep, you are right again! And I have to think part of the problem is that these new pilots are less "fliers" than they are computer jokeys. Real life isn't a simulation.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: TonyS

It's not so much that, as it is crews not working together like they did for years. There have been a number of incidents recently where one pilot was convinced the other had done something, or saw something happening, and they expected them to react to it.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yikes, that's worse than I'd expected. I won't be flying any time soon.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 06:05 PM
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Typical Approach I'm afraid. Some instrument approaches have you almost touch down prior to go-around if the decision is made at missed approach point (MAPT).

Looks horrendous to public, pretty normal in pilot world.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

No, this was a lot more than just looking low. The tower doesn't call a warning for an approach that is normal, but looks low.



posted on Dec, 13 2017 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Huh? That looked perfectly OK? Including the decent profile visually? Am I missing something here?



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