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Trump Administration moving to allow Restaurants to keep workers tips

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posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

Of course they're going to make a best effort to word it in a way that doesn't sound immediately nefarious. In 2011 the law was passed that prevented employers from pocketing any of the tips its workers made. This proposed change to the law now rescinds this, which means that employers would be legally empowered to only allow their waitstaff to keep tips in the amount required to meet minimum wage.
edit on 50pm17fpmTue, 12 Dec 2017 14:39:18 -0600America/ChicagoTue, 12 Dec 2017 14:39:18 -0600 by Wayfarer because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:39 PM
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Seems like a good plan to lower productivity of the workers. A good staff already brings in more customers which benefits the owners.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:40 PM
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I'm a Trump supporter. I'm not for waiters losing out on tips. But I don't believe that's what will actually happen.


+2 more 
posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer

Detailed summary of proposal here

The intent seems to be to allow tip pooling when wait staff are paid at least full minimum wage. So, to allow the employers to require the normally tipped folks to share some of that customer admiration with the folks that don't normally get tipped.

I don't see the part of the proposal that allows the employer to pocket any tips and the OP source doesn't point that section out either.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: Zarniwoop
a reply to: Wayfarer

I don't see the part of the proposal that allows the employer to pocket any tips and the OP source doesn't point that section out either.


Neither did I, I guess we'll just have to take the media's word for it.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:44 PM
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originally posted by: Zarniwoop
I don't see the part of the proposal that allows the employer to pocket any tips and the OP source doesn't point that section out either.


And you probably wont because that is illegal.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:45 PM
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Resist! Whenever you dine out be sure to leave a cash "gift" as opposed to a cash tip. All this means is that you leave the desired "gift" of cash and instead of writing in an amount on the receipt on the line for tip write "Taxation is theft" with a smiley face.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer

It's your second link. Read past the summary and into the list of lawsuits that spurned this. The new regulation will effectively force all restaurant employees who want to pool tips to first pay ALL restaurant employees at or above federal minimum wage, then they can pool said tips. The current law allows restaurants to take a "tip credit" that permits limited pooling of tips to bring back of the house employees up to minimum wage. While there is the potential for employers to pocket the newly pooled tips themselves, there is also an equal (actually greater if you believe in the principles of competitive business and employee treatment) likelyhood of the employees in the back getting a piece of the tips on top of being paid federal minimum wage and the servers getting paid tips that aren't being used to bring their salary up to federal minimum wage as the current regulations allow.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer




Fair Labor Standards Act, that currently restrict employers who pay minimum wage from collecting/re-allocating tips earned by their employees.


If this is a real thing, then apparently it's not known. I've known MANY places that re-allocate tips for everyone from dish washers to cooks to the seater. Same is true for bar tenders. At least at every single bar I've been in.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Wayfarer

I don't care what the jingoistic legislation says, declared income is taxable, under the table is tax free.

They need every last penny for the war machine.


As much as I hate paying taxes, it's only fair that the cash tips are taxable just like every penny I spend in taxes. I can't get a free break from tips that I never get from working my butt off. They get by a lot of the time by taxing CC related tips and don't list the cash tips.

This is true in any place where tips are involved.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer

He better make sure to never eat at a restaurant again.

Never piss off your waiter till after you got your meal and refills.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: seeker1963
a reply to: Wayfarer


You linked to two documents without providing any meat FROM said documents to back up your accusations! If you think I am going to read thru them because you were too lazy to provide ANY proof of your accusations you're nutz!!!! How about showing what is in the proposal (which is what it is, it isn't law yet) to back up what you are saying!!

Where's the proof? Your post, BACK IT UP!


So you just admitted to being embarrassingly lazy by saying you can't read some text (the news article linked is barely a page long) and then blamed it on the OP.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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I stopped caring what happens to people's tips when I was informed that a 20% tip is the new "normal" tip and was then subjected to a lengthy explanation of why 20% is now considered (by who, other than those in the industry I still don't know) to be "standard" and that really, really it should be more like 30% if you want to be "fair" about it.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: interupt42
a reply to: Wayfarer

He better make sure to never eat at a restaurant again.

Never piss off your waiter till after you got your meal and refills.



It's no big deal, he doesn't eat food anyway. He just drinks 43 diet cokes a day and that's all he consumes.

CNN did a 3 hour docudrama about it.



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: Wayfarer

Sounds like it might be time to start leaving “gifts” instead of tips and putting it in the hands of the server instead of on a credit card or on the table.

If I find out a restaurant that I frequent is doing that, it will be the last overt tip I leave in that restaurant. I don’t care if my wife or myself has to meet the server in the restroom to deliver their “gift,” I won’t tolerate server tips going to the restaurant.

If it gets to the point where it can’t be avoided, I’ll just quit patronizing that establishment.

From now on, I’m gonna make it a point to ask my server if evasive action is necessary before I tip, I mean “gift.”



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
I stopped caring what happens to people's tips when I was informed that a 20% tip is the new "normal" tip and was then subjected to a lengthy explanation of why 20% is now considered (by who, other than those in the industry I still don't know) to be "standard" and that really, really it should be more like 30% if you want to be "fair" about it.


I tip 20% all the time, minimum.

So, there's that I guess, please don't shoot me.......



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: Wayfarer
a reply to: seeker1963

Of course they're going to make a best effort to word it in a way that doesn't sound immediately nefarious. In 2011 the law was passed that prevented employers from pocketing any of the tips its workers made. This proposed change to the law now rescinds this, which means that employers would be legally empowered to only allow their waitstaff to keep tips in the amount required to meet minimum wage.


Prove it!



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

Waiters live on tips, the wages don't cut it.

They want to tax it too. They went after flea market sales the same way, making resale numbers mandatory if you sell more than twice a year.

This way if you sell you have to report income. If you have to give tips to your boss then it become income, taxable.
edit on 12-12-2017 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:58 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: seeker1963
a reply to: Wayfarer


You linked to two documents without providing any meat FROM said documents to back up your accusations! If you think I am going to read thru them because you were too lazy to provide ANY proof of your accusations you're nutz!!!! How about showing what is in the proposal (which is what it is, it isn't law yet) to back up what you are saying!!

Where's the proof? Your post, BACK IT UP!


So you just admitted to being embarrassingly lazy by saying you can't read some text (the news article linked is barely a page long) and then blamed it on the OP.


I didn't start the thread and not provide the proof I made accusations of! But you knew that right?



posted on Dec, 12 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock

originally posted by: Shamrock6
I stopped caring what happens to people's tips when I was informed that a 20% tip is the new "normal" tip and was then subjected to a lengthy explanation of why 20% is now considered (by who, other than those in the industry I still don't know) to be "standard" and that really, really it should be more like 30% if you want to be "fair" about it.


I tip 20% all the time, minimum.

So, there's that I guess, please don't shoot me.......



Cool? I tip 20% if the service and food was great and the waitress was hot.

edit on 12-12-2017 by Shamrock6 because: removed the dickish impression



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